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  1. #16
    Incredible Member Astroman's Avatar
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    Hail to his memory. Rest in peace and thanks for all the great stories.

  2. #17
    Jesus Christ, redeemer! The Whovian's Avatar
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    My thoughts and prayers go out to Len's family
    One thing I ask from the LORD, this only do I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the LORD all the days of my life, to gaze on the beauty of the LORD and to seek him in his temple.--Psalm 27:4

    “Fortunately for me, I'm not a cop. so, I can break your face into a jigsaw puzzle if I want to...”--Daredevil

    “I am a citizen of the universe. And a gentleman to boot.”--The Doctor

  3. #18
    Ultimate Member Sacred Knight's Avatar
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    "They can be a great people Kal-El, they wish to be. They only lack the light to show the way. For this reason above all, their capacity for good, I have sent them you. My only son." - Jor-El

    "“Your boos mean nothing, I’ve seen what makes you cheer!”

  4. #19
    long time member Herowatcher's Avatar
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    Rest in peace Len Wein.
    Thank you for all that you contributed to the comic industry.
    One of the greats.

    His first story for DC and co-creator of Starfire, now Red Star.

    Teen Titans #18 (vol. 1)

    "History of the DC Universe" by Wolfman and Perez, when the DCU use to make sense.

  5. #20
    Tom Peyer's Pal Roger Stern's Avatar
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    As a writer, Len Wein was a master of both the long and the short form—able to produce huge, sweeping epics that spanned several issues, as well as heartbreakingly beautiful little stories in just a few pages.

    As an editor, he was incredibly supportive of artists and other writers, giving them just the right amount help needed to work their stories into shape.

    As a mentor, Len was always generous with his time, teaching clueless newbies—I was one of many—the nuts and bolts of their craft.

    As a friend, he was one of the best. Back in the day, when just about all of us lived in or around New York City, Len was one of the crew who got together regularly after work—for dinner or a movie or a poker game. In more recent years, after we had all scattered to the winds, and we saw him occasionally at conventions, it was always a treat. Len would pick up right where we'd left off, as if we'd last gotten together just a few days before, rather than a few years.

    We will miss him forever.
    I am not on MySpace. I am not on Facebook. I am not LinkedIn. I do not "Tweet." But I do have an Author's Page.

  6. #21
    Ultimate Member Lee Stone's Avatar
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    RIP, Mr. Wein.
    "There's magic in the sound of analog audio." - CNET.

  7. #22
    long time member Herowatcher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Stern View Post
    As a writer, Len Wein was a master of both the long and the short form—able to produce huge, sweeping epics that spanned several issues, as well as heartbreakingly beautiful little stories in just a few pages.

    As an editor, he was incredibly supportive of artists and other writers, giving them just the right amount help needed to work their stories into shape.

    As a mentor, Len was always generous with his time, teaching clueless newbies—I was one of many—the nuts and bolts of their craft.

    As a friend, he was one of the best. Back in the day, when just about all of us lived in or around New York City, Len was one of the crew who got together regularly after work—for dinner or a movie or a poker game. In more recent years, after we had all scattered to the winds, and we saw him occasionally at conventions, it was always a treat. Len would pick up right where we'd left off, as if we'd last gotten together just a few days before, rather than a few years.

    We will miss him forever.
    Thank you for sharing that.

    One of the earliest stories I've read by Len Wein's that made me a fan of his writing.

    Batman #323-324

    "History of the DC Universe" by Wolfman and Perez, when the DCU use to make sense.

  8. #23
    DC Comics Forum Mod The Darknight Detective's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Herowatcher View Post
    Thank you for sharing that.
    I'll gladly second that.

    One of the earliest stories I've read by Len Wein's that made me a fan of his writing.

    Batman #323-324

    That's a favorite of mine, too. The whole Selina Kyle arc was very memorable, IMO.
    A bat! That's it! It's an omen.. I'll shall become a bat!

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  9. #24
    Astonishing Member Johnny Thunders!'s Avatar
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    As a kid I bought comics for the art. Every once in awhile, the story seemed to stand out, and more often than not, from Justice League to Superman, those stories seemed written by Len Wein. I think he was the first writer I actually paid attention to beside Stan Lee, and when I bought comics cold, based on the cover, the biggest win was when Len wrote them.

  10. #25
    Astonishing Member Johnny Thunders!'s Avatar
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    I just forgot and realized, he wrote The Untold Legend of Batman, all the Batman anyone could ever want or need!

  11. #26

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    I will always remember him for his runs on Swamp Thing and JLA (reintroducing the Seven Soldiers of Victory and introducing the Freedom Fighters). And a hell of a nice guy.

    Sandy Hausler

  12. #27
    Mighty Member signalman112's Avatar
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    Len Wein wrote my All-Time favorite JOKER story in BATMAN #321.

    http://dc.wikia.com/wiki/Batman_Vol_1_321

  13. #28
    DC Comics Forum Mod The Darknight Detective's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by signalman112 View Post
    Len Wein wrote my All-Time favorite JOKER story in BATMAN #321.

    http://dc.wikia.com/wiki/Batman_Vol_1_321
    That was the first Joker story I actually bought that wasn't a back issue or gift.
    A bat! That's it! It's an omen.. I'll shall become a bat!

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  14. #29

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    One of the things I loved about about Len Wein's work is that even if some of his stories didn't have a great plot, I still enjoyed the scripting. I just loved the wit, the humor, the heartfelt moments, his dialogue just seemed to flow easier when I read it than in other writers' works, so that I enjoyed even his more generic stories. And when he was good he delivered tales that were very memorable.

    His importance in the shaping of the DC and Marvel Universes cannot be overstated. I particularly remember reading Showcase Presents: Phantom Stranger Vol. 1 and realizing that the Phantom Stranger I know, both as a character and as type of stories, was essentially shaped by Len Wein. He also created Cassandra Craft, a great addition to the series.

    Belated condolences to his family and loved ones and may he Rest in Peace.

    He was one of the Greats.
    Last edited by Great O.G.U.F.O.O.L.; 09-16-2017 at 07:27 AM.

  15. #30

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    Len Wein and I were comic book fans as kids back in Levittown, NY. He was older than me (by six years, I see), and was friends with people in the industry, which made him kind of a local star to us younger fans. (I remember being so impressed when he showed me a sketch Jack Kirby made especially for him of the Silver Surfer diving into a bowl of pasta!) Due to health concerns Len rarely left his house, and he sometimes played host to us kids. (Today this might be seen as suspicious or creepy. At the time it was just friendly.) We would sit around talking about comics, and his expertise and connections made us feel like we were part of something important: comic book fandom.

    I was very happy - and in an indirect, home-town sort of way, proud - for Len when he broke into the business, made a name for himself, and went on the become tremendously influential. He co-created the characters Swamp Thing and Wolverine, and was one of the people responsible for kickstarting the long-dormant X-MEN series, which has gone on to become one of the most significant and successful comic-book (and comic-book-adjacent) series in history.

    I sometimes talked to him at conventions. We really didn't know each other, but he always took the time to say hello. He seemed to have grown into a very kind and decent man, as well as a great talent.

    I was shocked and saddened to see that he had died, much too soon. My thoughts and my heart go out to his family and loved ones, and to those of my friends who knew him much better than I did. RIP, Len. Thanks for the conversations.
    Doctor Bifrost

    "If Roy G. Bivolo had seen some B&W pencil sketches, his whole life would have turned out differently." http://doctorbifrost.blogspot.com/

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