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  1. #46
    Fantastic Member Gurz's Avatar
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    I'm optimistic about the book. When Frank Miller is really passionet, he has only Alan Moore as rival. Two absolute best comic book writters.

  2. #47
    Ultimate Member Sacred Knight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by titansupes View Post
    Was just watching on of Jim Lee's Twitch videos of him drawing a page for AC #1000, and he briefly mentions this project-- Apparently it's got a lot to do with Superman's relationships with various women and how they've affected him. He name drops Lana, Lois and-- get ready-- Lori Lemaris.

    Not an angle I was expecting.

    About 25mins 30secs minutes in here.

    https://www.twitch.tv/videos/236783550
    This actually doesn't surprise me, knowing Miller's views on Superman's romantic relationships. He's always seemed especially interested in Superman and non-human entities in regards to romance, hence his penchant exploring Superman with Diana, so getting Lori into this story makes tons of sense. In regards to Lois though I'll be curious to see if she doesn't show up till near the end, and keep the idea that Clark doesn't meet her till Metropolis, or if they go a Smallville-like route and have them meet sooner.
    Last edited by Sacred Knight; 03-31-2018 at 12:50 PM.
    "They can be a great people Kal-El, they wish to be. They only lack the light to show the way. For this reason above all, their capacity for good, I have sent them you. My only son." - Jor-El

    "Now why don't we step up here and everybody get stepped up, and let's get some stepped up personal space up in this place." - Phillip Jacobs

  3. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gurz View Post
    I'm optimistic about the book. When Frank Miller is really passionet, he has only Alan Moore as rival. Two absolute best comic book writters.
    You need to read more comics. Miller and Moore have done some great work, but they're by no means the "absolute best" comic book writers. Both have a disdain for traditional superheroes and both would rather deconstruct iconic characters and rebuild them into caricatures.

    The true greats go unsung.

  4. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atlas View Post
    You need to read more comics. Miller and Moore have done some great work, but they're by no means the "absolute best" comic book writers. Both have a disdain for traditional superheroes and both would rather deconstruct iconic characters and rebuild them into caricatures.

    The true greats go unsung.
    Moore has written Supreme and Tom Strong which are anything but deconstructions of superheroes. Moore in fact has been very vocal about superhero comics becoming excessively dark.

  5. #50
    Obsessed & Compelled Bored at 3:00AM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Z View Post
    Moore has written Supreme and Tom Strong which are anything but deconstructions of superheroes. Moore in fact has been very vocal about superhero comics becoming excessively dark.
    Yes, Alan Moore would come to regret what he created with Watchmen. He later lamented what he had done to superheroes because he was 'in a bad mood' for a few years

    His work on Supreme and Tom Strong were very much celebrations

  6. #51
    Fantastic Member Gurz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Atlas View Post
    You need to read more comics. Miller and Moore have done some great work, but they're by no means the "absolute best" comic book writers. Both have a disdain for traditional superheroes and both would rather deconstruct iconic characters and rebuild them into caricatures.

    The true greats go unsung.
    I have to admit that i haven't read as many comics as some of the expert users on this forum but i have read some, mostly modern stuff and when you decide to get in to super hero comics what is recommended to you are Alan Moore and Frank Miller. People are like, you want super hero stuff ? then read Watchmen, The Killing Joke and The Dark Knight Returns first, the three absolute best works of Super hero comics. They are considered like that by many including me as far as i read super hero comics. And i usually don't like the old stuff... Lately i try Claremont Uncanny X-Men, i read almost half of the first omnibus and it was medicore at best so far. It Really pales in compereson to The what i consider the absolute best. May be it gets better in the further parts... but i'm really dissapointed with Claremont X-Men right now. I read some Silver age DC and i don't want to talk about the silver age DC... those stories are just cring worthy terrible things. They are the true joke versions of characters.
    Last edited by Gurz; 04-01-2018 at 12:46 PM.

  7. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gurz View Post
    I have to admit that i haven't read as many comics as some of the expert users on this forum but i have read some, mostly modern stuff and when you decide to get in to super hero comics what is recommended to you are Alan Moore and Frank Miller. People are like, you want super hero stuff ? then read Watchmen, The Killing Joke and The Dark Knight Returns first, the three absolute best works of Super hero comics. They are considered like that by many including me as far as i read super hero comics. And i usually don't like the old stuff... Lately i try Claremont Uncanny X-Men, i read almost half of the first omnibus and it was medicore at best so far. It Really pales in compereson to The what i consider the absolute best. May be it gets better in the further parts... but i'm really dissapointed with Claremont X-Men right now. I read some Silver age DC and i don't want to talk about the silver age DC... those stories are just cring worthy terrible things. They are the true joke versions of characters.
    I got to disagree with the notion that the silver age are the joke versions of the characters. I see them as the foundation of the ideas and concepts that made DC so great and worth reading. From the characters to creation of things likes the Multiverse, etc/ Just because the style is different and more straight forward, on the nose, doesn't mean they don't have it's quality (And this is coming from someone who came into comics, late 90s'-early 2000's). I get that people have a different output on the medium and comic tastes are subjective, but I feel like Silver Age was definitely a good part of what made DC great.

  8. #53
    Incredible Member RepHope's Avatar
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    It was honestly a shock for me to see what the 2017 trade sales were for DKR3. I had totally forgotten that book, but apparently it was a smashing success for both Miller and DC. I was questioning why they would be so eager to resign him, but after seeing the sales I understand now. I do wonder, can he successfully translate his success with Batman to Superman? I have no doubt the Year One/DKR Miller could've done a fantastic job. But I honestly thought Master Race was just "okay". Supes' portrayal was better, but the story as a whole? Just ok.

    I guess we'll see, but man do I wish there was another Superman book by someone else that wasn't an origin story.

  9. #54
    Fantastic Member Gurz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironman2978 View Post
    I got to disagree with the notion that the silver age are the joke versions of the characters. I see them as the foundation of the ideas and concepts that made DC so great and worth reading. From the characters to creation of things likes the Multiverse, etc/ Just because the style is different and more straight forward, on the nose, doesn't mean they don't have it's quality (And this is coming from someone who came into comics, late 90s'-early 2000's). I get that people have a different output on the medium and comic tastes are subjective, but I feel like Silver Age was definitely a good part of what made DC great.
    To each his/her own dude. But i mean come on Silver Age Batman is terrible... If it wasn't for Frank Miller, People wouldn't take his book serious ever again. Thanks everything for Frank Miller, God Budha, Allah whatever is out there thanks all of them for Frank Miller. lol

    Quote Originally Posted by RepHope View Post
    It was honestly a shock for me to see what the 2017 trade sales were for DKR3. I had totally forgotten that book, but apparently it was a smashing success for both Miller and DC. I was questioning why they would be so eager to resign him, but after seeing the sales I understand now. I do wonder, can he successfully translate his success with Batman to Superman? I have no doubt the Year One/DKR Miller could've done a fantastic job. But I honestly thought Master Race was just "okay". Supes' portrayal was better, but the story as a whole? Just ok.

    I guess we'll see, but man do I wish there was another Superman book by someone else that wasn't an origin story.
    I love Frank Miller but i haven't read DKIII yet. I believe The Dark Knight Returns is the perfect end to The Batman but they keep on dragining it...

  10. #55
    Astonishing Member MRP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gurz View Post
    To each his/her own dude. But i mean come on Silver Age Batman is terrible... If it wasn't for Frank Miller, People wouldn't take his book serious ever again. Thanks everything for Frank Miller, God Budha, Allah whatever is out there thanks all of them for Frank Miller. lol



    I love Frank Miller but i haven't read DKIII yet. I believe The Dark Knight Returns is the perfect end to The Batman but they keep on dragining it...
    You skipped over a whole lot of Bronze Age Batman that made Batman much more serious again-O'Neill/Adams. Englehart/Rogers, the long Doug Moench run, etc. etc. long before Miller ever worked on Batman. Miller's work on DK was certainly paradigm shifting, but it didn't appear ex nihilo, there had been a shift in the tone of Batman long before Miller got there, pretty much as soon as there was a change in the editorial control of Batman in later Silver Age and moving into the Bronze Age. When DKR became a big hit, Denny O'Neil (the Batman editor at the time) doubled down on the darker elements that DK brought to the table, but the sillier elements of the Silver Age were long gone from Batman by that that time.

    Perhaps it would be helpful if you would put some names to the idea of the best comic writers instead of leaving it a vague term so people could pin down what you think makes up good comic writing to lend some actual depth and content to the conversation instead of speaking in terms of vague generalities and simplified generalizations.

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    Comic fans get the comics their buying habits deserve.

  11. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gurz View Post
    I have to admit that i haven't read as many comics as some of the expert users on this forum but i have read some, mostly modern stuff and when you decide to get in to super hero comics what is recommended to you are Alan Moore and Frank Miller. People are like, you want super hero stuff ? then read Watchmen, The Killing Joke and The Dark Knight Returns first, the three absolute best works of Super hero comics. They are considered like that by many including me as far as i read super hero comics. And i usually don't like the old stuff... Lately i try Claremont Uncanny X-Men, i read almost half of the first omnibus and it was medicore at best so far. It Really pales in compereson to The what i consider the absolute best. May be it gets better in the further parts... but i'm really dissapointed with Claremont X-Men right now. I read some Silver age DC and i don't want to talk about the silver age DC... those stories are just cring worthy terrible things. They are the true joke versions of characters.
    They are not at all "true joke versions" of the characters, whatever that even means. I don't expect you to love or even like them since you began reading comics with Watchmen and TDKR, but don't disparage them simply because you don't like them. TDKR and Watchmen can only be fully appreciated by people who know the characters and the genre. They were intended to deconstruct those concepts and make them "adult" or "realistic." The truth is, superhero comics can indeed have elements of adult storytelling and realism, but they should not be fully realistic. They're fantasy stories. I suspect the people who recommended you start with TDKR and Watchmen and Killing Joke knew nothing about comics beyond having read those books themselves.

    The best place to start is out-of-continuity stories like All-Star Superman or something in-continuity but designed for new readers like Batman Hush or Superman/Batman by Jeph Loeb. These are pure superhero comic books that don't deconstruct and/or apologize for being pure superhero comic books. The first volume of Ultimate Spider-Man, Waid's "Operation Rebirth" for Cap and Claremont and Miller's Wolverine mini are great for similar reasons as they're fairly self-contained and new reader-friendly.

    Going back to the Silver Age stuff, they are pure superhero comic books that managed to have depth despite targeting kids. Without those books, the superhero comic book would have died out. Open your mind to these tales and you'll find a lot to love.

  12. #57
    Fantastic Member Last Son's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ironman2978 View Post
    I got to disagree with the notion that the silver age are the joke versions of the characters. I see them as the foundation of the ideas and concepts that made DC so great and worth reading. From the characters to creation of things likes the Multiverse, etc/ Just because the style is different and more straight forward, on the nose, doesn't mean they don't have it's quality (And this is coming from someone who came into comics, late 90s'-early 2000's). I get that people have a different output on the medium and comic tastes are subjective, but I feel like Silver Age was definitely a good part of what made DC great.
    I agree. Where would Superman be without the silver age? His rogues gallery would be non-existent, there would be no Supergirl/Argo City, no Kandor, no Phantom Zone or its inhabiting criminals, no Krypto, no Legion of Superheroes, no Fortress of Solitude, Lex Luthor would still only be Luthor. A lot of the controversy over the rebooting of Superman in the 80s is it did away with a huge chunk of the Superman mythos in the name of plausibility and making Superman the only surviving Kryptonian.

  13. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by millernumber1 View Post
    One of those interviews, where Miller talks about Clark being a ladies man...that might be interesting, but also might be sad...Hoping for the best!
    I wouldn't necessarily mind reading a "sad" Superman story, provided it's told well (and in this case I'm sure the story will be told well). There is a certain kind of tragedy about Superman (being the last survivor of his planet, etc) so it would be cool to see this angle explored

    Quote Originally Posted by Gurz View Post
    I'm optimistic about the book. When Frank Miller is really passionet, he has only Alan Moore as rival. Two absolute best comic book writters.
    I tend to agree, for the most part. There are others, of course (Neil Gaiman, Mark Millar and suchlike) but Frank and Alan are pretty much the biggest names around.

    BTW I wonder if Frank will be painting a variant cover to each issue of Superman Year One? I love Frank's visuals as well as his writing so I'd definitely buy his variants (if he were to do them)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sacred Knight View Post
    This actually doesn't surprise me, knowing Miller's views on Superman's romantic relationships. He's always seemed especially interested in Superman and non-human entities in regards to romance, hence his penchant exploring Superman with Diana, so getting Lori into this story makes tons of sense. In regards to Lois though I'll be curious to see if she doesn't show up till near the end, and keep the idea that Clark doesn't meet her till Metropolis, or if they go a Smallville-like route and have them meet sooner.
    Yeah. That's what I was thinking. Definitely looking forward to seeing Lori ... she doesn't get much attention. Would also be keen to see Miller write Clark and Diana's first encounter (not sure if we'll get to see it in this particular story but it would be cool nonetheless)

  14. #59
    Incredible Member RepHope's Avatar
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    Lori was the mermaid girlfriend right? Heh that's going to be interesting, wonder if he'll tie her to Atlantis in some way?

  15. #60
    Ultimate Member Sacred Knight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by friendly-fire-press View Post

    Yeah. That's what I was thinking. Definitely looking forward to seeing Lori ... she doesn't get much attention. Would also be keen to see Miller write Clark and Diana's first encounter (not sure if we'll get to see it in this particular story but it would be cool nonetheless)
    Considering Miller's said he doesn't even don the costume till the very end, Wonder Woman being in this in any capacity is highly doubtful. If this story gets a sequel or something though? I'd all but guarantee it.
    "They can be a great people Kal-El, they wish to be. They only lack the light to show the way. For this reason above all, their capacity for good, I have sent them you. My only son." - Jor-El

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