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  1. #1
    Amazing Member Blastaar's Avatar
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    Default Jack Kirby Signatures Real VS Fake

    Just bought Jack Kirby signature that was part of a pin set on Ebay. There are several more listed, you can find them searching Jack Kirby Signature Collection Pin set. Questions I have about it are does $100-$150 seem too low to be authentic and it states this collection is from 1995, year after he passed. I had heard rumors that his wife was signing stuff in the final years.Thoughts on if these are legit or not?

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  2. #2
    Latverian ambassador Iron Maiden's Avatar
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    Hard to say but it looks like it was a limited set, like my book. I think it's more than likely is his signature but it would take an expert to know for sure. We are taking the production company's word that they got him to sign. With the book I have, it was produced by Kevin Eastman's company. He is the creator of the Teen-aged Mutant Ninja Turtles.

  3. #3
    Amazing Member Blastaar's Avatar
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    Did some digging. Sounds like he wasn't signing anything after the 80's and what was signed was not a strong signature. Well that's a $100 into the wind
    Well the search continues for something authentic. Unless you were there, have a picture, or it's on a sketch, it's going to be tough.
    Last edited by Blastaar; 05-16-2018 at 08:54 AM.

  4. #4
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
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    Sympathy, of course.

    A couple of friends were serious signature collectors, and both said that establishing provenance was problematical in most cases. Certainly the "certificate of authenticity" produced by many sellers can be a joke. Yes, it means a lot if the signer is well known in the trade, and has a reputation built up over years for cast iron integrity. But such certificates mean nothing if it's just signed by a general dealer, or anyone with a flaky rep.

    Ultimately if you saw the guy sign it in front of you...you know its a genuine signature 100%. Anything else and that 100% falls...send something to be signed in a star's changing room, and one of his mates might help him out by signing, for example.

    The guy I know who built biggest collection (mainly of football and cricket signatures) mainly did it in two ways...getting signatures face to face (at matches, training grounds, etc) and by just sending prepared cards to cricket and football clubs with a stamped addressed envelope. No offer of payment for the signatures! ("If a guy wants paying for his signature, he's a wassock anyway, however famous he is")

    Replies from footballers tended to be scant (and I guess would be near zero nowadays when game has been relentlessly commercialised), but the vast majority of cricketers were happy to sign.
    Last edited by JackDaw; 05-16-2018 at 09:44 AM.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackDaw View Post
    Sympathy, of course.

    A couple of friends were serious signature collectors, and both said that establishing provenance was problematical in most cases. Certainly the "certificate of authenticity" produced by many sellers can be a joke. Yes, it means a lot if the signer is well known in the trade, and has a reputation built up over years for cast iron integrity. But such certificates mean nothing if it's just signed by a general dealer, or anyone with a flaky rep.

    Ultimately if you saw the guy sign it in front of you...you know its a genuine signature 100%. Anything else and that 100% falls...send something to be signed in a star's changing room, and one of his mates might help him out by signing, for example.

    The guy I know who built biggest collection (mainly of football and cricket signatures) mainly did it in two ways...getting signatures face to face (at matches, training grounds, etc) and by just sending prepared cards to cricket and football clubs with a stamped addressed envelope. No offer of payment for the signatures! ("If a guy wants paying for his signature, he's a wassock anyway, however famous he is")

    Replies from footballers tended to be scant (and I guess would be near zero nowadays when game has been relentlessly commercialised), but the vast majority of cricketers were happy to sign.
    Not heard wassock for ages☺

  6. #6
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kilderkin View Post
    Not heard wassock for ages☺
    It was years ago that my mate said it. I think the term was “wassock”, though it may have been something else that started with w.

  7. #7
    Astonishing Member Phoenixx9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blastaar View Post
    Did some digging. Sounds like he wasn't signing anything after the 80's and what was signed was not a strong signature. Well that's a $100 into the wind
    Well the search continues for something authentic. Unless you were there, have a picture, or it's on a sketch, it's going to be tough.
    That is what I heard as well.

    I have seen his signature in the past, and just from rembrance, I don't think this is his real one. But I could be wrong.

    On the brighter side, you do have a nice set designed by Jack Kirby.

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