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  1. #1
    Mighty Member Enigma's Avatar
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    Default James Bond 007 - The Guide to the World of James Bond Media

    Screen Shot 2018-05-30 at 21.10.48.jpg


    ***Notice***
    This is a work in progress and will take time as I am contributing to it as and when I can. The intent behind this is to provide a platform for new readers to find the James Bond that they are interested in, current James Bond fans to find media that they might not be aware of and for pretty much anybody to just have a nosy. A couple of people have already offered to help out with bits and pieces, but if anybody would like to contribute then please do let me know.

    Additionally... There is a section at the end for people to show off their James Bond collections. Comics, books, car models, memorabilia, artwork or games collection. Whatever it is, feel free to send it to me and I will include it. Bonus points for cosplay...

    To go to a specific part of the guide, simply click the title in the contents page (hyperlinked) and enjoy. Some sections will be spread over multiple posts due to character restrictions.


    OO7 Agent - James Bond: Case Files Report


    OO1 - Agent History
    • The Birth of Bond

    OO2 - Novels
    • Ian Fleming Novels
    • Post-Fleming Novels
    • Young Bond
    • The Moneypenny Diaries

    OO3 - Comics and Graphic Novels
    • Early Works
    • Dark Horse
    • Dynamite Entertainment
    • Newspaper Comic Strips

    OO4 - Audiobooks, Radio & Television
    • Audiobooks
    • Radio
    • Television

    OO5 - Films
    • Eon Production Films
    • Miscellaneous Films

    OO6 - Video Games

    OO7 - Forum Collections

    008 - Miscellaneous Links
    • Artwork

    O09 - Thanks and Acknowledgements
    Last edited by Enigma; 05-30-2018 at 03:09 PM.

  2. #2
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    OO1 - Agent History

    The Birth of Bond

    "I am going to write the spy story to end all spy stories." - Ian Fleming

    Write the spy story to end all spy stories he did. Fleming took inspiration for the character from the people he met during his service in the Naval Intelligence Division during World War II, naming him after an ornithologist who's book Fleming had been reading, which he described as the 'dullest name I ever heard'. Thus, we would meet the spy of spies, Bond, James Bond.

    In 1953, James Bond burst into British folklore brandishing a Beretta 418, a gritty personality and a penchant for women. Casino Royale had hit the shelves. The Beretta 418 would ultimately be replaced after fan criticism from Major Geoffrey Boothroyd, after whom the future quartermaster would be named. The gritty personality of Bond would be a mainstay of the novels, the opening and closing lines of Casino Royale exemplify the Fleming novels.

    "The scent and smoke and sweat of a casino are nauseating at three in the morning."

    "The bitch is dead now."

    This gritty version of Bond would be largely lost in the films, replaced with a less serious Bond, but the recent Dynamite comics have largely returned to Bond of the novels. Bond's promiscuous relationship with women has always been a key facet of the character, both in the novels and other media. 'Bond girls', as we collectively know them, would feature many aspects of Bond's life in the form of love, betrayal, heartbreak and sacrifice.

    Fleming would write 12 Bond novels and two short story collections before his death in 1964, with the first Bond film, Dr No, being released two years prior. Authors ranging from John Gardner to Anthony Horowitz would take up the mantle of author for the bond novels, whilst the Bond movies would utilise the talents such as Sean Connery and Pierce Brosnan. Bond would filter into comics and videogames over the years. It is this variety of James Bond media that we will delve into, discuss and applaud (or not).

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    OO2 - Novels

    A video showing some of the James Bond novels is available at the end of the 'Novels' section.

    Ian Fleming Novels

    Fleming would introduce the world to James Bond via his previously discussed debut novel, Casino Royale. Writing from his Jamaican home, Goldeneye, Fleming would go on to pen another eleven James Bond novels on an annual basis, the final two published posthumously, and two collections of short stories.

    In 1953, we see Bond introduced in Casino Royale, dispatched to France to play baccarat in order to bankrupt Le Chiffre, paymaster of Bond's long running enemies, SMERSH. We see Bond as the mighty hero and lavishing in success with his new comrades, Vesper Lynd of MI6 and Felix Leiter of the CIA. Bond experiences love, betrayal, torture and is brought to his knees. Of course, our hero rises again and returns to his cold exterior as the principal agent of the OO section. Casino Royale provides one hell of an introduction to Bond and these characteristics of the plot can be found throughout later stories. Over the years, Bond would prevent the ex-Nazi Drax from destroying London, escape a SMERSH assassination plot, retrieve nuclear bombs hijacked by SPECTRE as part of a blackmail plot and face off against The Man with the Golden Gun to rescue his reputation after being brainwashed.

    After the successful TV adaptation of Casino Royale (TV section), Fleming was commissioned by CBS to write a James Bond television series. The series was ultimately scrapped, but Fleming published four episode plots as short stories along with a fifth independent story as a short story collection, For Your Eyes Only. For Your Eyes Only features: From a View to a Kill; Quantum of Solace; The Hildebrand Rarity; For Your Eyes Only; Risico. In 1966, a second short story collection would be released entitled 'Octopussy and The Living Daylights', which would go on to include two extra stories in The Property of a Lady and OO7 in New York.

    Personally, I believe the Fleming novels to be the best of Bond. They are genuine Bond without the flashy gadgets and softening of Bond's character. Many of the younger Bond fans may have never read the Fleming novels, and I must admit that growing up on the films, they were a more recent delight for me. However, I would implore anybody interested in Bond to start here where it all began. At the least, pick up Casino Royale and enjoy the birth of a legend of British folklore. Do not pay too much attention to the sharing of names between the books and films, they rarely reflect the books.

    A question which is often asked with any book series is 'Do I have to read them in order?'. The short answer here, is no. However, the Blofeld trilogy; Thunderball, On Her Majesty's Secret Service and You Only Live Twice; is best read in order, although not strictly required. The rest are largely independent but there are references sprinkled throughout the books and personally, I enjoyed picking up on them whilst reading. The verdict, you don't have to read them in order, but I suggest that you do nonetheless.


    Fleming Novels
    1953 - Casino Royale
    1954 - Live and Let Die
    1955 - Moonraker
    1956 - Diamonds are Forever
    1957 - From Russia, with Love
    1958 - Doctor No
    1959 - Goldfinger
    1960 - For Your Eyes Only
    1961 - Thunderball
    1962 - The Spy Who Loved Me
    1963 - On her Majesty's Secret Service
    1964 - You Only Live Twice
    1965 - The Man with the Golden Gun
    1966 - Octopussy and the Living Daylights

    The Fleming novels have a range of editions with some rather beautiful covers, and these are available on Ebay etc. However, Penguin's 'Vintage' line has published the complete Fleming collection in paperback format with matching, albeit rather simple, covers. They are a uniform and cheap way to get a hold of the Fleming novels. For those with more artistic interest, the Vintage line has also now published the first three novels in hardback editions with what I can only describe as beautiful artwork. Personally, I prefer the hardbacks. Yet, we have an even more astonishing option from The Folio Society, who are gradually publishing incredible hardcover versions with what I can only describe as breath-taking artwork by Fay Dalton (she also produced the cover for the recent Casino Royale graphic novel adaptation), complete with a slipcase. These are absolutely stunning, and I want them all, unfortunately they are also pricey, so personally it will take me a while to collect them.



    Post-Fleming Novels

    I have read very little of the post-Fleming novels, a situation which I am slowly correcting. However, we can discuss them anyway. We will split them roughly by author for ease.

    Initial Releases (1968-1979)
    After the death of Ian Fleming in 1964, a plan was put in place to produce a stream of James Bond novels. The novels were intended to be written by a variety of authors, all writing under the collective pseudonym 'Robert Markham'. The first and only entry in this series was Colonel Sun by Kingsley Amis (who also penned The Book of Bond and The James Bond Dossier), which was received well although clearly not Fleming's Bond. Colonel Sun is also featured in the British comic strips which we will discuss in the comics section. Interestingly, it also provided inspiration for various aspects of films; the torture scene in Spectre (y'know, that one…), the kidnapping of M in The World is not Enough and the name of our villain in Die Another Day. The use of continuation novel scenes in the films is far from new, but Amis is the only author to be officially credited as a source. This is generally considered the best of the continuation novels and worth picking up. This period of Bond novels also provided us with novelisations of The Spy Who Loved Me and Moonraker, which are of course completely different to the Fleming novels. These are worth reading for the interesting background given to Jaws, if nothing else. There was also a fictional biography of Bond, James Bond: The Authorized Biography of OO7 - do not read this and I advise burning any copies that you come across for the good of everybody. Ultimately, grab Colonel Sun as a priority read, but I wouldn't rush to read the others. I would suggest that if you like the films, then any of the novelisations are likely to be a safe bet.

    1968 - Colonel Sun
    1973 - James Bond: The Authorised Biography of OO7
    1977 - James Bond: The Spy Who Loved Me
    1979 - James Bond and Moonraker



    John Gardner Novels (1981-1996)
    John Gardner took up the role of writing the James Bond novels from 1981 to 1996, producing a total of 14 original novels and two novelisations (Goldeneye and Licence to Kill). Gadner's concept was to bring Bond to the 1980's, but to keep the age and general profile of the characters - the time has passed but the characters remain. The Gardner novels are pretty touch and go, with the most common accusation being that they get a bit too silly - although we accept the Moonraker film and that was practically a comedy. The greatest sin here for me is the use of American terminology. The Gardner novels introduce us to Leiter's daughter, flirt with political assassinations and obviously, more bloody Nazi storylines, because the Nazis never get old apparently. Also, the introduction of Q'ute was awful, included to avoid copyright issues associated with 'Q'. It was pointed out that Major Boothroyd would have been fine, but whatever. Also, Gardner changed Bond's gun to an ASP 9mm. Sorry, I promise to stop picking on John Gardner. Seriously though, what the heck?

    Ultimately, there is a mixed bag of novels here and opinions on which entries are read worthy and which should be handled with Marigolds, tends to differ person-to-person. Personally, I wouldn't go out of your way to read them except for completions sake. If you are going to read them though, I would just pick one with a blurb that sounds interesting to you as the quality seems to be fairly homogenous. My picks would be 'No Deals, Mr Bond', 'For Special Services' and 'The Man from Barbarossa'. Again, the novelisations are safe picks too.

    1981 - Licence Renewed
    1982 - For Special Services
    1983 - Icebreaker
    1984 - Role of Honour
    1986 - Nobody Lives for Ever
    1987 - No Deals, Mr Bond
    1988 - Scorpius
    1989 - Win, Lose or Die
    1989 - Licence to Kill
    1990 - Brokenclaw
    1991 - The Man from Barbarossa
    1992 - Death is Forever
    1993 - Never Send Flowers
    1994 - SeaFire
    1995 - GoldenEye
    1996 - Cold
    Last edited by Enigma; 05-30-2018 at 01:37 PM.

  4. #4
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    Raymond Benson Novels (1996 - 2002)
    You will be thrilled to know that the Walther makes a return in the Benson novels, be it the PPK (Dr No onwards in the films) or the P99 (TND onwards in the films). Major Boothroyd also makes a comeback, so things are looking good! As with Gardner before him, Benson brought Bond forward in time. These novels are a bit closer to Fleming than those of Gardner, but of course are not quite Fleming. Benson brings in his own version of SMERSH, named 'The Union', with a trilogy of books; High Time to Kill, Doubleshot and Never Dream of Dying. We see three more novelisations with Benson; Tomorrow Never Dies, The World is not Enough and Die Another Day. Again, these really depend on your opinion of the film and are a safe choice on that basis. I love Tomorrow Never Dies and The World is Not Enough was good enough, although the only thing that I liked about Die Another Day was the theme, and 'Read this bitch!' - that was good, let's be honest.

    In addition to the mentioned novelisations, Benson wrote six original novels and three short stories. I like the short story 'Blast from the Past' because Bond's son (with Kissy Suzuki) is brought in, temporarily at least. To be honest, the rest are largely a case of 'take it or leave it', but definitely grab them if you find them on sale or second hand or something.

    1997 - Blast from the Past
    1997 - Zero Minus Ten
    1997 - Tomorrow Never Dies
    1998 - The Facts of Death
    1999 - Midsummer Night's Doom
    1999 - High Time to Kill
    1999 - Live at Five
    1999 - The World is not Enough
    2000 - DoubleShot
    2001 - Never Dream of Dying
    2002 - The Man with the red Tattoo
    2002 - Die Another Day


    Recent Novels (2008 - Present)
    The recent novels are interesting, and we see a few authors. It is interesting to note that there was a desire for Lee Child to be the continuing author at this point, but he turned them down twice, citing a lack of financial incentive and likened the prospect to 'watching an ABBA tribute band'. Ouch! Fair enough Lee. I would actually like to see Lee Child write a one-off Bond instalment, but I completely respect his lack of interest.

    The first entry, Devil May Care, came from Sebastian Faulkes and was a mix of drugs and the old 'rile up the UK and Soviets'. To be honest, it isn't a great story in terms of plot, but it was really nice to see Bond back in 1960's and this is probably the closest we have seen to a Fleming novel. Next up was Jefferey Deaver's Carte Blanche, which I suggest that you pretend doesn't exist. The primary plot is focused on a waste-disposal businessman who is paid by a pharmaceutical company to kill a researcher who is about to cure cancer, it was bloody awful. Deaver attempts to reimagine the roots of Bond as part of the 'Overseas Development Group' and it's just bloody awful. I try to hide this one near the back of my Bond books in case my neighbours see it on my shelf. William Boyd drops 'Solo' in our laps, a classic revenge story after Bond is left for dead by a mercenary. I wouldn't worry too much about these books to be honest. The most recent two entries come from Anthony Horowitz, which I am very excited about. Trigger Mortis is sat on my shelf awaiting reading just now, but I am very hopeful, especially given that it follows on from Goldfinger and includes an appearance (at least) from Pussy Galore. Additionally, this novel reportedly features unpublished Fleming material - interesting. Forever and a Day will be released on 31/5/18 and is a prequel to Casino Royale. From the description provided, this is Bond's introduction into the OO section after the death of the previous OO7, this could be very good indeed.

    2008 - Devil May Care
    2011 - Carte Blanche
    2013 - Solo
    2015 - Trigger Mortis
    2018 - Forever and a Day



    Young Bond
    Young Bond provides an insight into the early life of James Bond, kicking off with his arrival at Eton in SilverFin. The series received a lot of criticism before it even began, with many feeling that it wasn't where Bond should go. Personally, I agree. Ultimately, Charlie Higson penned the introductory SilverFin and four books thereafter; Blood Fever, Double or Die, Hurricane Gold and By Royal Command. I read SilverFin when it was first published and may have read By Royal Command at some point, but to be honest I'm really not into the idea of Young Bond, although I suppose it may bring in new younger readers. However, I would prefer them to be enticed by actual James Bond. In an attempt to revisit Young Bond, I recently picked up the SilverFin graphic novel adaptation, but have not yet read it. Steve Cole continued the Young Bond series, starting with Shoot to Kill in 2014, followed by; Heads You Die, Strike Lightning and Red Nemesis. Bond is expelled from Eton at the end of the Higson novels and Cole picks up from this point. I'm not really a fan to be honest, but maybe pick up SilverFin and see what you think.

    Charlie Higson
    2005 - SilverFin
    2006 - Blood Fever
    2007 - Double or Die
    2007 - Hurricane Gold
    2008 - By Royal Command
    2009 - A Hard Man to Kill

    Steve Cole
    2014 - Shoot to Kill
    2016 - Heads You Die
    2016 - Strike Lightning
    2017 - Red Nemesis



    The Moneypenny Diaries
    This series comes from Samantha Weinberb, under the speudonym Kate Westbook, Moneypenny's niece. The Moneypenny Diaries is an official spin-off series, consisting of three novels (Guardian Angel, Secret Servant and Final Fling), plus two short stories (For Your Eyes Only, James and Moneypenny's First Date with Bond). I haven't read any of these, but I certainly intend to. Guardian Angel is intended to fill in gaps between novels - it also gives us Moneypenny's first name, Jane. Funnily, there was a lot of controversy initially (which I vaguely remember myself) about whether The Moneypenny Diaries were actually from a real person - what I really like is that the production team really played along with it. Obviously, it was eventually confirmed to be just stories. Secret Servant takes place around The Man with the Golden Gun, when James Bond has been brainwashed and the secret service is all over the place - Moneypenny to the rescue. It gives us a look into the chaotic side of Moneypenny's life. This is particularly interesting just now because the Moneypenny one-shot has brought additional interest into exploring the character, so these may see more reading now. Final Fling is a strange one, split in half. One half is various adventures from Moneypenny's time in the service, whilst the other follows Kate Westbrook at the time of publication as she tries to publish the diaries. I can't say how good these are as I haven't read them yet, but they look really, really interesting and I intend to pick them up ASAP.

    2005 - The Moneypenny Diaries: Guardian Angel
    2006 - For Your Eyes Only, James
    2006 - Secret Servant: The Moneypenny Diaries
    2006 - Moneypenny's First Date with Bond
    2008 - The Moneypenny Diaries: Final Fling


    Last edited by Enigma; 05-30-2018 at 01:41 PM.

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    OO3 - Comics

    A video showing some of the Dynamite James Bond collected editions is at the end of the 'Comics' section.

    Early Works
    James Bond graced the world comic books in 1962 with a Classics Illustrated adaptation of the Dr No film. Unfortunately, it's a pain to get a hold of (at a decent price at least) and I still haven't read it. However, I have read the subsequent Marvel adaptations of For Your Eyes Only and Octopussy films, both of which are worth a read. My only criticism for For Your Eyes Only would be that the Citroen 2CV chase scene could've been expanded a little - it's an iconic moment after all. They aren't cheap for what are a 2 issue and a one-shot magazine style adaptation respectively, but they are enjoyable reads and manage to include the key components of the storyline. They do stay very true to the films, so as good as they are, I wouldn't make them a priority. The one annoying thing for me is that I wanted to custom bind all of the film adaptations into a nice HC collection, but the magazine style of Octopussy ruins that idea. We also have adaptations of the Licence to Kill and GoldenEye films, although I am yet to read either of these. I would however, like to pick them up in the near future, although not as a priority.

    Mike Grell, who adapted Licence to Kill, also produced an original series, Permission to Die. Permission to die was absolutely fantastic. In fact, I consider it better than the Dynamite entries except for Felix Leiter and Casino Royale. It's a three-part series, each maybe two standard issues long, with Grell writing and doing the art. Essentially, Bond gets sent into Hungary to extract a scientist's niece in exchange for a new rocket propulsion system. There are a few strange art panels and a handful of typos, but other than that it's fantastic. It nods to the books and films quite a lot, which was really nice, including a fairly substantial role for the Gypsies from 'From Russia with Love', including a post-humous role for Kerim Bey. The only aspect that I didn't like of that they completely copied the feast scene, including the rescuing shot from Grant. It felt like they took the nod too far. Still, definitely pick this up if you can - loads of Ebay lots for all three issues together. Kaled agreed (the only person I know of who has read it on the forum) and was part of convincing me to buy it!


    1962 - Dr No film adaptation (Classics Illustrated)
    1981 - For Your Eyes Only film adaptation (Marvel)
    1983 - Octopussy film adaptation (Marvel)
    1989 - Licence to Kill film adaptation (Eclipse)
    1991 - Permission to Die (Eclipse)
    1995 - GoldenEye film adaptation (Topps Comics)



    Dark Horse
    Dark Horse started publishing James Bond comics in 1992, starting with possibly the worst entry in James Bond media, Serpent's Tooth. Oh wait, that would be Light of my Death actually… Anyway, it was too ridiculous for me and the puns were just an onslaught and not particularly good. It felt cheap, verdict - don't bother. Regarding Light of my Death, this is how I initially described it in the James Bond thread after I read it; "I just read Light of my Death, which is published in the 'Dark Horse Comics' series, which has bits of each story in different issues - it's weird. Anyway, Light of my Death was so incredibly awful that I'm struggling to describe it to you. Don't buy it. If somebody offers it to you for free, thank them kindly but send them on their way. So awful." So, there you go. In between the previous two, we have an intended four-issue series called A Silent Armageddon, which was never completed. There are two published issues, but I wouldn't bother with it since it's incomplete, unless you're like me and want to collect all James Bond comics. In that case, go get em' Tiger.

    Next came two-parter called Shattered Helix. This was a step-up from Serpent's Tooth (then again, what isn't?) with a slightly fantastical plot which sees Bond try to stop a criminal organisation from getting hold of a mutagen in Antarctica. I'm not going to lie, the story was weird, and the art was mediocre, but somehow it wasn't actually too bad. I would suggest grabbing it if you see it for a good price. I paid 10 for the two, but I'd probably hold off for a couple of quid less. The following entry, Minute of midnight, sees a return of the Dark Horse Comics publication tactic and also of Doug Moench (Serpent's Tooth…). I am yet to read this as I've only found copies with the AvP issue cover and I'm holding out for a James Bond copy, but given the writer behind it, I'm not too optimistic! The Dark Horse run ended with Quasimodo Gambit, which I am yet to read as they are so bloody expensive to get a hold of. I can't say much about it, except that it better bloody be worth it when I finally get it…

    1992 - Serpent's Tooth
    1993 - A Silent Armageddon
    1993 - Light of my Death
    1994 - Shattered Helix
    1994 - Minute of Midnight
    1995 - The Quasimodo Gambit



    Dynamite Entertainment
    The acquiring of the licence from IFP to develop new James Bond comics in 2014, is in my opinion the most exciting thing to happen in the James Bond world for a long time. These books have been a huge success, despite some more fragile entries. The general structure consisted initially of an ongoing monthly series, a selection of mini-series which are not considered to be a part of the ongoing mini-series (although actually there really doesn't seem to be a difference…) and some spin-off series. All series now begin at #1. The ongoing series consists of VARGR, Eidolon and Black Box. The first two were strong entries, partly thanks to the absolute steal of having an Ellis/Masters combo for them both, although unfortunately the Percy/Lobosco team's entry (Black Box) got a lesser review. The additional mini-series are generally speaking solid entries, leaning not too far either way and largely a matter of personal taste, with Hammerhead being the strongest entry in my opinion. Even stronger though, are the two one-shot components of the side stories, Service and Solstice. The former is a period piece, whilst the latter is a Christmas special. Finally, we have the spin-off series, consisting of Felix Leiter (typical 6 issues series), Moneypenny (one-shot) and M (one-shot). M was a good entry although not spectacular, but Moneypenny was a fantastic one-shot and I would really like to see her get a mini-series. The standout however, is the Felix mini-series, which I also think is the strongest James Bond entry full stop - annoying given that it isn't a Bond story as such. I covered these (except for The Body and M I think) in video reviews at the tail-end of 2017, which you can in three parts:

    Dynamite James Bond Review
    Part 1
    Part 2
    Part 3

    Dynamite have also published an adaptation of Fleming's first novel, Casino Royale. Unfortunately, the book suffered from numerous delays to publication (I had it cancelled twice), but my God it was worth it. It is absolutely fantastic, especially the cover art by Fay Dalton. Interestingly, there is a little '1' on the bottom of the spine, so it looks like we will be seeing a continuation!

    Something that Dynamite have done really well, is the publication of hardcovers. They have clearly thought this out in advance (take note publishers…) and the entries all match a general theme (standard hardcover format) whilst still being discernible as ongoing or spin-off (colour coded). Additionally, the novel adaptations also follow this classification system. Almost every hardcover features a cover gallery at the end, which is ideal because there are some truly fantastic covers, and often some sketch work. They are all around the 15 mark, often less and very rarely more, especially if you look around. There is a lot left to explore in the comics. Some of the ideas suggested in the James Bond thread include one-shots for famous villains and Bond girls and a mini-series for Tiger Tanaka. Something on Blofeld would be interesting too I think.

    6 Issue Mini Series Unless Specified Otherwise
    2015 - VARGR
    2016 - Eidolon
    2016 - Hammerhead
    2017 - Black Box
    2017 - Service (one-shot)
    2017 - Kill Chain
    2017 - Solstice (one-shot Christmas special)
    2017 - Felix Leiter
    2017 - Moneypenny (one-shot)
    2018 - M (one-shot)
    2018 - The Body
    Last edited by Enigma; 05-30-2018 at 01:50 PM.

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    Newspaper Comic Strips

    In 1958, James Bond was depicted in a comic strip for the first time in the Daily Express adaptations of the novels, drawn by the late John McLusky, with Anthony Hern as writer. Gammidge would take over as writer for all but one (Dr No) of the subsequent Daily Express comic strips, all the way up to You Only Live Twice (in order until the end when they jumped about a bit). Yaroslav Horak (artist) and Jim Lawrence (writer) then took over, and after finishing off the adaptations of the novels, they produced a series of original stories. At this point, the Daily Express dropped the series, but the creative team carried on and produced work to be published in the Sunday Express and the Daily Star (plus some European productions). This included a return for John McLusky! There are a lot of original stories here and many James Bond fans will never have had the chance to appreciate them, it's a terrible shame. I'm still working my way through them as we speak but worry not for there are multiple collections by Titan Comics. The first attempt at collecting the comic strips was a bit frankly half-assed, but the second series was more comprehensive and collected all of the comic strips. A third series converted these into six paperback omnibus collections. However, currently the entire comic strip collection is being collected (four down so far) in a fourth series consisting of huge hardcover omnibus collections, in order except for the initial SPECTRE omnibus which collected the relevant entries. My suggestion would be the most recent and most extravagant collection (fourth series), but the third series is currently 2.99 each at Forbidden Planet (huge discount) if you're not bothered about having the nice hardcover collected editions.

    1958 to 1958 - Casino Royale
    1958 to 1959 - Live and Let Die
    1959 to 1959 - Moonraker
    1959 to 1960 - Diamonds are Forever
    1960 to 1960 - From Russia with Love
    1960 to 1960 - Dr. No
    1960 to 1961 - Goldfinger
    1961 to 1961 - Risico
    1961 to 1961 - From a View to a Kill
    1961 to 1961 - For Your Eyes Only
    1961 to 1962 - Thunderball
    1964 to 1965 - On Her Majesty's Secret Service
    1965 to 1966 - You Only Live Twice
    1966 to 1966 - The Man with the Golden Gun
    1966 to 1966 - The Living Daylights
    1966 to 1967 - Octopussy
    1967 to 1967 - The Hildebrand Rarity
    1967 to 1968 - The Spy Who Loved Me
    1968 to 1969 - The Harpies
    1969 to 1969 - River of Death
    1969 to 1970 - Colonel Sun
    1970 to 1971 - The Golden Ghost
    1971 to 1971 - Fear Face
    1971 to 1971 - Double Jeopardy
    1971 to 1971 - Starfire
    1971 to 1972 - Trouble Spot
    1972 to 1972 - Isle of Condors
    1972 to 1973 - The League of Vampires
    1973 to 1973 - Die with My Boots On
    1973 to 1973 - The Girl Machine
    1973 to 1974 - Beware of Butterflies
    1974 to 1974 - The Nevsky Nude
    1974 to 1975 - The Phoenix Project
    1975 to 1975 - The Black Ruby Caper
    1975 to 1975 - Till Death Do Us Apart
    1975 to 1976 - The Torch-Time Affair
    1976 to 1976 - Hot-Shot
    1976 to 1976 - Nightbird
    1976 to 1977 - Ape of Diamonds
    1977 to 1977 - When the Wizard Awakes
    1977 to 1977 - Sea Dragon
    1977 to 1978 - Death Wing
    1978 to 1978 - The Xanadu Connection
    1978 to 1979 - Shark Bait
    1981 to 1981 - Doomcrack
    1981 to 1982 - The Paradise Plot
    1982 to 1983 - Deathmask
    1983 to 1983 - Flittermouse
    1983 to 1983 - Polestar
    1983 to 1983 - The Scent of Danger
    1983 to 1984 - Snake Goddess
    1984 to 1984 - Double Eagle

    Last edited by Enigma; 05-30-2018 at 01:43 PM.

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    007 - Forum Collections


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    Bond section is at 10:14
    Last edited by Enigma; 06-01-2018 at 09:21 AM.

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