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  1. #1
    All-New Member BleedBlack's Avatar
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    Default Your Top Five Favorite Spider-Man Runs Ever

    Just curious to see what everyone else on here thinks are the best Spider-Man collaborations of all time. In any continuity, mainstream or otherwise. It might help a new reader decide what to look at first, or a person like me, who has their faves and has actually been pretty close minded to some of the other stuff I didn't really like at first glance.
    I'm talking about writer/artist runs here. I'm aware that many writers and artists have left the comics at different times and may have worked with several others on the same run, but to me story and art are equally important, so I want to hear about your five favorite Spider teams, the issues that they did and why you love them.
    Here are mine;

    1. Amazing Spider-Man vol 2 #30-58, vol. 1 #500-508
    By J. Michael Straczynski and John Romita Jr.
    I know that Straczynski's run went south literally right after Romita Jr. left, but these 38 stories are some of the best Spider-Man comic books of all time, in my opinion. Morlun, Dr. Octopus, Doctor Strange and just a much needed level of quality storytelling that had been missing for many years in the comics. The fact that Romita Jr. is my favorite Spider-Man artist of all time definitely put this one over the top for me. My top 4 are pretty interchangeable, but Romita Jr. is at his absolute best here, and that's enough to make this run my number one. Combined with Scott Hanna's inks and the gorgeous colors, this run looks even better than it reads.

    2. Spectacular Spider-Man #178-200
    By J.M. Dematteis and Sal Buscema
    I will always have a soft spot for this one since I read it as it came out when I was a kid. My very first comic was Spectacular Spider-Man #234, the first issue of Sal Buscema's very long run on the title, but it was only when J.M. came on as the writer 3 years later that I became so engrossed in a comic book story that I couldn't wait for the next month to find out what happened next. The fact that this run culminated with possibly the greatest and most moving single issue Spider-Man story ever produced in issue 200 just topped it all off so nicely. Talk about a payoff. It brought tears to my 12 year old eyes.

    3. Amazing Spider-Man #224-251
    By Roger Stern and John Romita Jr.
    I know this one is discussed often on this forum and rightfully so. Pretty much Spider-Man at his best. The thing that impresses me the most about this one is that other than 'Murder by Spider' in #228 and the Stilt Man story in #237, both of which Romita Jr. didn't draw, there is not a single sub par story in the whole run. A couple of the best Vulture stories ever, the Black Cat, that classic Juggernaut story, the Cobra and Mr. Hyde, the Roxxon/Will'o'the Wisp story were all just great. Of course it all led up to that amazing Hobgoblin story for the last year or so. No one has done the Hobgoblin better that Stern. This run started strong and finished even stronger.

    Amazing Spider-Man #39-123
    By Stan Lee, Gerry Conway and John Romita Sr., Gil Kane
    This is a weird one to figure. Just because there was so much over lap between these guys. Conway scripted over Lee's plots for his first few issues and Romita went from pencilling to inking over Kane in issue 89. But you can't deny the impact or importance of the stories included in these 85 issues. The Green Goblin unmasking Peter, the debut of The Kingpin and his emergance as Spider-Man's greatest enemy, several crazy Doc Ock stories, the introduction of Mary Jane, the death of Captain Stacy, the entirety of Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy's romance and finally her death along with the apparent (and the never should have been retconned) death of Norman Osborn.
    Add in the absolute mastery of John Romita's amazing artwork, and these are all must read stories.

    5. Spider-Man 2099 #1-25
    By Peter David and Rick Leonardi
    I had a really easy time picking four runs and a very difficult time thinking of a fifth one. Though this one doesn't come close to the other four for me, I immensely enjoyed this comic as a kid. I really liked Miguel O'Hara and I love Peter David's writing. This was a really cool and original idea.


    I thought about the first 38 issues Lee and Ditko did, as I realize their importance and originality, but have always hated Ditko's artwork and stories featuring Peter as a high school student. I much prefer him as a college age guy with a little more confidence, rather than the science nerd Lee and Ditko protrayed him as.
    So there are my five. What do you guys think? What are your five faves? I really want to know some other Spider-Man fans' favorites because I've read and re-read these comics. If anyone suggests something on par with these stories I would be grateful.

  2. #2
    Astonishing Member David Walton's Avatar
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    You know, I actually like the "Murder by Spider" story! It was one of my earliest Spider-Man memories and man, the story terrified me as a kid.

  3. #3
    Mighty Member Inversed's Avatar
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    I have a hard time placing what my top five would be, but I can say what my top choice is, and that probably has to be Brian Michael Bendis' Ultimate Spider-Man from 2000 to 2011 (and even including the Miles Morales era from 2011 to 2015).

    I feel the run is the most consistent in terms of quality and overall enjoyment, I love the combination of variety in terms of the storytelling, mixed in with all of the excellent intimate and character moments that make it shine. It reinvents all of the characters in such a perfect way, and all of the wonderful dynamics and developments that come from it. Bagley's art is also of course excellent, and even all of the follow-up artists, Immonen, Lafuente, Pichelli, and Marquez I thought were great too!

    Plus as an added bonus, I think the run is the easiest for anybody to jump in and read, with the perfect pacing for the trades.
    Current Reading List: Amazing Spider-Man, Spider-Gwen, West Coast Avengers, Ms. Marvel, Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man, Avengers, Sonic The Hedgehog

  4. #4
    BAMF!!!!! KurtW95's Avatar
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    1. Lee/Ditko
    2. Lee/Romita
    3. Thomas/Kane
    4. Stern/JRJR
    5. Michelinie/McFarlane
    Good Marvel characters- Bring Them Back!!!

  5. #5
    Loony Scott Taylor's Avatar
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    Bendis/Bagley
    Lee/Romita
    Lee/Ditko
    Wein/Andru
    DeFalco/Frenz
    Every day is a gift, not a given right.

  6. #6
    Mighty Member Jekyll's Avatar
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    Not sure if I can get as specific as you did but off the top of my head:
    1. Lee - I mean you can’t really not include the legend himself!
    2. JMS- Really enjoyed his take and run on Spider-Man.
    3. Conway
    AKA= FlashFreak

    Favorite Characters:

    DC:
    The Flash (Jay, Wally, Barry), Hal Jordan,Ray Palmer, Jack Knight, Stargirl, Captain Marvel/Shazam! (Billy Batson), & Carter Hall.

    MARVEL:
    Daredevil, Spider-Man (Peter Parker), Iron Fist, & The Fantastic Four.


    Current Pulls:
    The Flash, Hawkman, Daredevil, Amazing Spider-Man, Venom, ASM Renew Your Vows, Marvel 2 in One, Immortal Hulk, and Fantastic Four.

  7. #7

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    Interesting question.

    1. Lee/ Ditko Amazing Spider-Man
    A rare case where the first run is the best. It includes two all-time top five stories (The Master Planner Saga, Amazing Fantasy #15) and introduces the best rogues gallery, supporting cast and power set in comics, while creating something new in comics: the best teen superhero ever, and one who actually grows.

    2. Stern/ Romita & friends Amazing Spider-Man
    It's Romita & friends since Ron Frenz drew the Kid Who Collects Spider-Man. I don't know any run has as high a percentage of 5/5 issues, with the best long-term arc ever (the Hobgoblin saga), the best fight scene (Nothing Can Stop the Juggernaut) as well as things that would be standouts in anyone else's run (the Black Cat saga, the Vulture's origin.) The ideal run about a Spider-Man who had been a superhero for a few years.

    3. Bendis/ Bagley Ultimate Spider-Man
    An excellent reimagination of the high school age Spider-Man in a modern era with modern storytelling. Sometimes lagged a bit, but very readable, quite accessible and capable of surprise.

    4. Lee/ Romita Amazing Spider-Man
    The template for what the Spider-Man comics have become. More great stories, and one of the most enjoyable takes on Peter Parker ever.

    I was struggling a bit coming up with the last run. Slott's good but is he on that level? Peter David's 1980s Spectacular work is pretty good and has a unique identity with the focus on street-level crime. Mark Millar's run is excellent, but essentially one big story. JMS started off really well, but never quite lived up to the first ten issues. Jenkins is quite underrated. Conway's more than just the Night Gwen Stacy Died, even if there is some dreck. DeMatteis' best story isn't his best run.

    After a lot of thought, I'm going with Slott in fifth place. This would cover his solo stint as writer from Amazing Spider-Man #648 on. His first ten issues were exceptional, with an excellent opening arc and one of his highlights "No One Dies" but his follow-ups included Spider Island, the Superior Spider-Man saga, and Renew Your Vows.
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  8. #8
    All-New Member BleedBlack's Avatar
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    Cool. Thanks for the replies. I've never checked out the Bendis Ultimate Spider-Man stuff, but I think I will now. It seems to be held in high regard with fans. And if you guys think it's on par with the Lee and Stern stuff, wow. That's high praise indeed to me.
    To be honest, I have not read anything since the J. Michael Straczynski Amazing stories. I lost interest when Deodato took over the art and JMS had Gwen Stacy hooking up with Norman Osborn. Then they had the secret identity reveal and the marriage ending. I just lost interest, much the way I did in the mid nineties with the clones and endless crossover stuff.
    Dan Slott. Is he the current writer still? He took over in #648? If so then he must have been on the comic for a long time now. Like Stan Lee long. Or longer.

  9. #9
    Mighty Member whiteshark's Avatar
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    1-Stan Lee/Steve Dikto.
    2-Stan Lee/John Romita Sr.
    3-Roger Stern/John Romita Jr.
    4-J.M.DeMatteis/Sal Buscema.
    5-Dunno,either the Dan Slott,Gerry Conway or Marv Wolfman have runīs in Amazing Spider-Man that are great and i canīt decide which one is better.
    Last edited by whiteshark; 06-14-2018 at 07:51 PM.

  10. #10
    Mighty Member Inversed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BleedBlack View Post
    Cool. Thanks for the replies. I've never checked out the Bendis Ultimate Spider-Man stuff, but I think I will now. It seems to be held in high regard with fans. And if you guys think it's on par with the Lee and Stern stuff, wow. That's high praise indeed to me.
    To be honest, I have not read anything since the J. Michael Straczynski Amazing stories. I lost interest when Deodato took over the art and JMS had Gwen Stacy hooking up with Norman Osborn. Then they had the secret identity reveal and the marriage ending. I just lost interest, much the way I did in the mid nineties with the clones and endless crossover stuff.
    Dan Slott. Is he the current writer still? He took over in #648? If so then he must have been on the comic for a long time now. Like Stan Lee long. Or longer.
    He started writing as part of a brain trust of people at #546, but he became the main writer starting at #648 all the way until #801 which comes out next week. Then Nick Spencer will be taking over the book in July.

    If you count the brain trust era, then he has been on the book longer than Stan Lee, although even not counting it, Slott has the most amount of issues at over 150+ (and thats also not including all the .1, annuals, and extra issues)
    Current Reading List: Amazing Spider-Man, Spider-Gwen, West Coast Avengers, Ms. Marvel, Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man, Avengers, Sonic The Hedgehog

  11. #11
    Spectacular Member K7P5V's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BleedBlack View Post
    Just curious to see what everyone else on here thinks are the best Spider-Man collaborations of all time. In any continuity, mainstream or otherwise. It might help a new reader decide what to look at first, or a person like me, who has their faves and has actually been pretty close minded to some of the other stuff I didn't really like at first glance.
    I'm talking about writer/artist runs here. I'm aware that many writers and artists have left the comics at different times and may have worked with several others on the same run, but to me story and art are equally important, so I want to hear about your five favorite Spider teams, the issues that they did and why you love them.
    Here are mine;

    1. Amazing Spider-Man vol 2 #30-58, vol. 1 #500-508
    By J. Michael Straczynski and John Romita Jr.
    I know that Straczynski's run went south literally right after Romita Jr. left, but these 38 stories are some of the best Spider-Man comic books of all time, in my opinion. Morlun, Dr. Octopus, Doctor Strange and just a much needed level of quality storytelling that had been missing for many years in the comics. The fact that Romita Jr. is my favorite Spider-Man artist of all time definitely put this one over the top for me. My top 4 are pretty interchangeable, but Romita Jr. is at his absolute best here, and that's enough to make this run my number one. Combined with Scott Hanna's inks and the gorgeous colors, this run looks even better than it reads.

    2. Spectacular Spider-Man #178-200
    By J.M. Dematteis and Sal Buscema
    I will always have a soft spot for this one since I read it as it came out when I was a kid. My very first comic was Spectacular Spider-Man #234, the first issue of Sal Buscema's very long run on the title, but it was only when J.M. came on as the writer 3 years later that I became so engrossed in a comic book story that I couldn't wait for the next month to find out what happened next. The fact that this run culminated with possibly the greatest and most moving single issue Spider-Man story ever produced in issue 200 just topped it all off so nicely. Talk about a payoff. It brought tears to my 12 year old eyes.

    3. Amazing Spider-Man #224-251
    By Roger Stern and John Romita Jr.
    I know this one is discussed often on this forum and rightfully so. Pretty much Spider-Man at his best. The thing that impresses me the most about this one is that other than 'Murder by Spider' in #228 and the Stilt Man story in #237, both of which Romita Jr. didn't draw, there is not a single sub par story in the whole run. A couple of the best Vulture stories ever, the Black Cat, that classic Juggernaut story, the Cobra and Mr. Hyde, the Roxxon/Will'o'the Wisp story were all just great. Of course it all led up to that amazing Hobgoblin story for the last year or so. No one has done the Hobgoblin better that Stern. This run started strong and finished even stronger.

    Amazing Spider-Man #39-123
    By Stan Lee, Gerry Conway and John Romita Sr., Gil Kane
    This is a weird one to figure. Just because there was so much over lap between these guys. Conway scripted over Lee's plots for his first few issues and Romita went from pencilling to inking over Kane in issue 89. But you can't deny the impact or importance of the stories included in these 85 issues. The Green Goblin unmasking Peter, the debut of The Kingpin and his emergance as Spider-Man's greatest enemy, several crazy Doc Ock stories, the introduction of Mary Jane, the death of Captain Stacy, the entirety of Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy's romance and finally her death along with the apparent (and the never should have been retconned) death of Norman Osborn.
    Add in the absolute mastery of John Romita's amazing artwork, and these are all must read stories.

    5. Spider-Man 2099 #1-25
    By Peter David and Rick Leonardi
    I had a really easy time picking four runs and a very difficult time thinking of a fifth one. Though this one doesn't come close to the other four for me, I immensely enjoyed this comic as a kid. I really liked Miguel O'Hara and I love Peter David's writing. This was a really cool and original idea.


    I thought about the first 38 issues Lee and Ditko did, as I realize their importance and originality, but have always hated Ditko's artwork and stories featuring Peter as a high school student. I much prefer him as a college age guy with a little more confidence, rather than the science nerd Lee and Ditko protrayed him as.
    So there are my five. What do you guys think? What are your five faves? I really want to know some other Spider-Man fans' favorites because I've read and re-read these comics. If anyone suggests something on par with these stories I would be grateful.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    Interesting question.

    1. Lee/ Ditko Amazing Spider-Man
    A rare case where the first run is the best. It includes two all-time top five stories (The Master Planner Saga, Amazing Fantasy #15) and introduces the best rogues gallery, supporting cast and power set in comics, while creating something new in comics: the best teen superhero ever, and one who actually grows.

    2. Stern/ Romita & friends Amazing Spider-Man
    It's Romita & friends since Ron Frenz drew the Kid Who Collects Spider-Man. I don't know any run has as high a percentage of 5/5 issues, with the best long-term arc ever (the Hobgoblin saga), the best fight scene (Nothing Can Stop the Juggernaut) as well as things that would be standouts in anyone else's run (the Black Cat saga, the Vulture's origin.) The ideal run about a Spider-Man who had been a superhero for a few years.

    3. Bendis/ Bagley Ultimate Spider-Man
    An excellent reimagination of the high school age Spider-Man in a modern era with modern storytelling. Sometimes lagged a bit, but very readable, quite accessible and capable of surprise.

    4. Lee/ Romita Amazing Spider-Man
    The template for what the Spider-Man comics have become. More great stories, and one of the most enjoyable takes on Peter Parker ever.

    I was struggling a bit coming up with the last run. Slott's good but is he on that level? Peter David's 1980s Spectacular work is pretty good and has a unique identity with the focus on street-level crime. Mark Millar's run is excellent, but essentially one big story. JMS started off really well, but never quite lived up to the first ten issues. Jenkins is quite underrated. Conway's more than just the Night Gwen Stacy Died, even if there is some dreck. DeMatteis' best story isn't his best run.

    After a lot of thought, I'm going with Slott in fifth place. This would cover his solo stint as writer from Amazing Spider-Man #648 on. His first ten issues were exceptional, with an excellent opening arc and one of his highlights "No One Dies" but his follow-ups included Spider Island, the Superior Spider-Man saga, and Renew Your Vows.
    Since it seems alright to combine creators, I went ahead with my own Spidey list:
    1. Lee/Ditko & Romita Sr. - Amazing Spider-Man
    2. Stern/JRJR & DeFalco/Frenz - Amazing Spider-Man
    3. Busiek/Olliffe - Untold Tales of Spider-Man
    4. Mantlo - Peter Parker the Spectacular Spider-Man
    5. DeMatteis - Marvel Team-Up

  12. #12
    Incredible Member Mike's Avatar
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    1. Lee with Ditko, Romita Sr. and Kane on Amazing Spider-Man
    2. Wein and Andru on Amazing Spider-Man
    3. Conway with Romita Sr., Kane and Andru on Amazing Spider-Man
    4. Mantlo on Marvel Team-Up
    5. Claremont and Byrne on Marvel Team-Up

  13. #13
    Spider Sense is Tingling Dangerous's Avatar
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    1) Lee / Romita
    2) Michelinie / McFarlane (sucker for McFarlane's art)
    3) J.M. DeMatteis / Sal Buscema
    4) Stern / JRJR
    5) Michelinie / Larsen

    Skip USM it's crap.
    Bagley was great on ASM, not so much on the rehashed 2000's book.
    Last edited by Dangerous; 06-15-2018 at 07:11 PM.

  14. #14
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    With Slott on his way out after his epic run, and Spencer's era about to start, I was just thinking that a case could be made that no other superhero has had as many top drawer runs as Spidey. I think Daredevil might be the only one to rival him on that count.

    Sticking strictly to ASM, my top five would be:

    1. Lee/Ditko. This run is so seminal - not just to Spider-Man, but to the entire comic book medium and the superhero genre - that it's importance can never be overstated. It was brilliant then and it still holds up. And one of the most brilliant things about it is that, for all the great work done on the book since, that the Lee/Ditko run still feels so unique and idiosyncratic. There's no Spider-Man quite like Ditko's Spider-Man.

    2. Lee/Romita Sr.. The smoothing out of the edges of Spider-Man. Everything in Peter Parker's world - even Peter himself - became more glamorous under the pen of Jolly John Romita. Normally that might be a bad thing but the Romita Sr. years really took Spidey to the next level. The quirkiness of the Ditko years was lost but the slickness that Romita Sr. imbued the book with was no step down. If anything, I think Romita Sr. ensured Spidey's longevity with his run. I think he took Spidey from being a cult success to being an icon.

    3. Conway/Kane/Andru. Gil Kane's work with Conway early in his run obviously led to one of the most iconic Spidey stories ever, a trauma so great it essentially ended the innocence of the Silver Age, but it's when Andru came on board that Conway's run really took off. As a writer/artist duo, I think Gerry Conway and Ross Andru were definitely one of the best teams to grace ASM. Andru is the most criminally underrated artist to ever draw Spidey, in my opinion. No one drew perspectives like he did. When his Spidey swung over the streets of New York, the angles he rendered were unlike any other. And as the first writer to have an extended run after Stan left, Conway nailed the soap opera aspects of the book, the all-important humor (Conway is one of the few Spidey writers to actually make me laugh out loud), and the villains in his run (both old and new) were top-notch. I should also really add Romita Sr to the principal players in this run as his covers played such a part in its appeal.

    4. Stern/Romita Jr.. The run that revived ASM after some lackluster years. Just good, tight Spidey action, done with a high degree of craft and care.

    5. Slott & co.. Too many artists joined Slott in his ten year run to name 'em all but the three that I think really defined his tenure were Ramos, Camuncoli and Martin. Even though Martin didn't contribute as much as the others, the issues that he did work on are so key to Dan's run that he must be considered an indispensable element of it. Some might say it's too soon to laud Slott's run as one of the best but I say screw that. It's a definitive run, period. Even if you personally don't like it, for whatever reason, the fact remains that for at least a couple of generations of fans, Dan Slott's Spidey is their Spidey. His name will forever be connected with the character.

    Some stretches of his run were better than others, naturally (ten years is a loooong time), but when it was hitting on all cylinders, it was incredible and it was never less than good fun.

    Honorable mention shout-outs to two personal favorite runs: the Len Wein/Andru run, which to me is just perfect old-school Spidey. Nothing of note really happens in it - the "big" new villains it introduced were Rocket Racer and Will O' the Wisp along with a third Green Goblin that went nowhere - but that's actually part of its charm to me. It's a reminder of a much simpler time in comics, long before things became so event driven. And also the DeFalco/Frenz run, which I actually prefer as a reader to the classic Stern/Romita Sr run that preceded it. DeFalco and Frenz were a great team, they carried the ball forward with the Hobgoblin, introduced some cool villains of their own, and affectionately evoked the Lee/Ditko era without feeling too retro. Had editorial stupidity not unfairly cut their run short, I think their run would be held in much higher esteem today. As is, it's still a very fun stretch of Spidey that - through no fault of the creative team - abruptly ends before a satisfying finish.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof. Warren View Post
    With Slott on his way out after his epic run, and Spencer's era about to start, I was just thinking that a case could be made that no other superhero has had as many top drawer runs as Spidey. I think Daredevil might be the only one to rival him on that count.

    Sticking strictly to ASM, my top five would be:

    1. Lee/Ditko. This run is so seminal - not just to Spider-Man, but to the entire comic book medium and the superhero genre - that it's importance can never be overstated. It was brilliant then and it still holds up. And one of the most brilliant things about it is that, for all the great work done on the book since, that the Lee/Ditko run still feels so unique and idiosyncratic. There's no Spider-Man quite like Ditko's Spider-Man.

    2. Lee/Romita Sr.. The smoothing out of the edges of Spider-Man. Everything in Peter Parker's world - even Peter himself - became more glamorous under the pen of Jolly John Romita. Normally that might be a bad thing but the Romita Sr. years really took Spidey to the next level. The quirkiness of the Ditko years was lost but the slickness that Romita Sr. imbued the book with was no step down. If anything, I think Romita Sr. ensured Spidey's longevity with his run. I think he took Spidey from being a cult success to being an icon.

    3. Conway/Kane/Andru. Gil Kane's work with Conway early in his run obviously led to one of the most iconic Spidey stories ever, a trauma so great it essentially ended the innocence of the Silver Age, but it's when Andru came on board that Conway's run really took off. As a writer/artist duo, I think Gerry Conway and Ross Andru were definitely one of the best teams to grace ASM. Andru is the most criminally underrated artist to ever draw Spidey, in my opinion. No one drew perspectives like he did. When his Spidey swung over the streets of New York, the angles he rendered were unlike any other. And as the first writer to have an extended run after Stan left, Conway nailed the soap opera aspects of the book, the all-important humor (Conway is one of the few Spidey writers to actually make me laugh out loud), and the villains in his run (both old and new) were top-notch. I should also really add Romita Sr to the principal players in this run as his covers played such a part in its appeal.

    4. Stern/Romita Jr.. The run that revived ASM after some lackluster years. Just good, tight Spidey action, done with a high degree of craft and care.

    5. Slott & co.. Too many artists joined Slott in his ten year run to name 'em all but the three that I think really defined his tenure were Ramos, Camuncoli and Martin. Even though Martin didn't contribute as much as the others, the issues that he did work on are so key to Dan's run that he must be considered an indispensable element of it. Some might say it's too soon to laud Slott's run as one of the best but I say screw that. It's a definitive run, period. Even if you personally don't like it, for whatever reason, the fact remains that for at least a couple of generations of fans, Dan Slott's Spidey is their Spidey. His name will forever be connected with the character.

    Some stretches of his run were better than others, naturally (ten years is a loooong time), but when it was hitting on all cylinders, it was incredible and it was never less than good fun.

    Honorable mention shout-outs to two personal favorite runs: the Len Wein/Andru run, which to me is just perfect old-school Spidey. Nothing of note really happens in it - the "big" new villains it introduced were Rocket Racer and Will O' the Wisp along with a third Green Goblin that went nowhere - but that's actually part of its charm to me. It's a reminder of a much simpler time in comics, long before things became so event driven. And also the DeFalco/Frenz run, which I actually prefer as a reader to the classic Stern/Romita Sr run that preceded it. DeFalco and Frenz were a great team, they carried the ball forward with the Hobgoblin, introduced some cool villains of their own, and affectionately evoked the Lee/Ditko era without feeling too retro. Had editorial stupidity not unfairly cut their run short, I think their run would be held in much higher esteem today. As is, it's still a very fun stretch of Spidey that - through no fault of the creative team - abruptly ends before a satisfying finish.
    Interesting question on which hero has the most top-drawer runs. An advantage for Spider-Man is that he's often had multiple titles, whereas Daredevil is always monthly. DC has a recent history of having great stories in standalone projects (mini-series/ OGNs) which wouldn't count in favor of great runs.

    Looking at top-drawer runs)
    Spider-Man: Lee/ Ditko, Lee/ Romita, Conway/ Kane, Wein/ Andru, Woldman/ Pollard, Stern/ Romita Jr, DeFalco/ Frenz, Michelinie/ McFarlane, Michelinie/ Larsen, Michelinie/ Bagley, DeMatteis/ Bagley, Claremont/ Byrne (MTU), DeMatteis (MTU), Mantlo/ Hannigan, David/ Buchler, Conway/ Buscema, DeMatteis/ Buscema, Jenkins/ Buckingham, JMS/ Romita, Bendis/ Bagley, Millar, Brand New Day, Slott & company.
    Daredevil: Lee/ Wood, Lee/ Colan, Miller, Miller/ Mazzuchelli, Smith/ Quesada, Bendis/ Maleev, Brubaker/ Lark , Waid/ Rivera/ Martin, Waid/ Samnee, Soule/ Garney
    Batman: 'Batman and the Outsiders' by Mike W. Barr and Jim Aparo, Morrison's Batman, Morrison's Batman & Robin, Morrison's Batman Inc, Snyder/ Capullo's Batman, Tom King's Batman, Loeb/ Sale, Moench/ Jones, O'Neil/ Adams, Englehart/ Rogers, Grant/ Breyfoogle, Tomasi/ Gleason

    Quote Originally Posted by K7P5V View Post
    Since it seems alright to combine creators, I went ahead with my own Spidey list:
    1. Lee/Ditko & Romita Sr. - Amazing Spider-Man
    2. Stern/JRJR & DeFalco/Frenz - Amazing Spider-Man
    3. Busiek/Olliffe - Untold Tales of Spider-Man
    4. Mantlo - Peter Parker the Spectacular Spider-Man
    5. DeMatteis - Marvel Team-Up
    Combining creators gets to be necessary because it's so rare to have a consistent writer/ artist pairing for every issue.
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

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