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  1. #31
    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Inversed View Post
    The way I've understood the concept of the "Spider-Family" is that it is a web (lol) of these characters, each in their own corners doing their own things, and if they need to they'll connect with each other to accomplish a specific goal, but for the most part all on their own. It's not like the Bat-family where all of them are there for each other and working together is part of the point. Though I would still be interested to see how that approach would work with these characters and interacting off each other more.
    I don't think Marvel even has a clear idea of what the "Spider-Family" is beyond a name that can encapsulate all the disparate Spider-Characters .

    I think your understanding of the concept is a good way of looking at it, and Peter's even referred to them as his "web," but I think in practice it's more difficult because of the idea of multiple spider-people existing and sometimes interacting in the same city taking away from the individual and independent aspect of Spider-Man, especially when big storylines in ASM often get dedicated to or focused on the other spiders.

    I think it's also an issue for other media that tries to incorporate multiple spiders in one setting in a way they weren't designed to be since, as you alluded to, they are meant to be more separate and uninvolved then they are in the cartoons or movies.

    Just look at how badly poor Miles gets treated in the Peter-led Spider-Man cartoons he's in. Reduced to a sidekick in both and saddled with a terrible name (Kid-Arachnid) in one or no codename on the other (Marvel's Spider-Man). At least in the comics he gets to be his own man and hero, if not as much as he was in his own universe where he was pretty much the sole Spider-Man.

  2. #32
    Astonishing Member David Walton's Avatar
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    I don't think Peter should have any kind of mentor figure in his life, as this diminishes the impact Uncle Ben's loss had.

    Well, let me qualify that by saying I'm okay with 'peripheral' mentor figures. Peter couldn't truly confide in Captain Stacy, for instance, but Stacy was able to covertly give Peter the kind of support he needed because he knew his secret. Robbie Robertson fits the bill, too, even though it's never been officially confirmed that he knows. But he's always there with the timely wink, wink advice that's just what Peter needs.

    I kind of prefer for Peter to have a bit of a chip on his shoulder and a slightly anti-social attitude when it comes to his relationships with other heroes. It's just more fun that way.

    And I think there's several solid reasons why Peter wouldn't take on a mentor: trust issues, authority issues, and guilt over what happened to Uncle Ben (and later Captain Stacy).
    Last edited by David Walton; 08-14-2018 at 11:37 AM.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Walton View Post
    I don't think Peter should have any kind of mentor figure in his life, as this diminishes the impact Uncle Ben's loss had.

    Well, let me qualify that by saying I'm okay with 'peripheral' mentor figures. Peter couldn't truly confide in Captain Stacy, for instance, but Stacy was able to covertly give Peter the kind of support he needed because he knew his secret. Robbie Robertson fits the bill, too, even though it's never been officially confirmed that he knows. But he's always there with the timely wink, wink advice that's just what Peter needs.

    I kind of prefer for Peter to have a bit of a chip on his shoulder and a slightly anti-social attitude when it comes to his relationships with other heroes. It's just more fun that way.

    And I think there's several solid reasons why Peter wouldn't take on a mentor: trust issues, authority issues, and guilt over what happened to Uncle Ben (and later Captain Stacy).
    Those are pretty solid reasons, come to think of it, particularly the idea of him having issues around authority. As Spider-Man, he's constantly demonized by the media and as a result treated like one of the criminals he tries to stop by authority figures in law enforcement. As Peter Parker, he was constantly bullied and I would presume from how little impediment there was to that bullying that the adult authority figures in his civilian life did very little to help him deal with or stop that bullying. Ultimate Spider-Man (the comics) took it even further by displaying how corrupt and morally compromised adult society was in general, with many of the adult heroes being jerks at best, Nick Fury wanting to control him or eliminate him if he couldn't be controlled since he figured Peter was a supervillain in the making (should've been looking closer at Reed Richards there, pal), damn near all the adults at school looking the other way on Flash Thompson's constant bullying because he was a star athlete, and adult authorities in law enforcement and media doing the same on Wilson Fisk's many crimes, even with solid proof of his guilt. In a nutshell, it would be improbable at best for someone with those bad experiences and issues with adult authorities to seek approval and/or guidance from them.
    The spider is always on the hunt.

  4. #34
    Loony Scott Taylor's Avatar
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    No, but its fun to see someone try to be his mentor. Remember that time Captain America tried to be his mentor, then Peter took a bullet for him, and he and the rest of the Ultimates just left him to die? Then he got up, went to Aunt May's house and saved her and Gwen from Norman Osborn, dying in the process? Again without any help from any of the Ultimates? Hilarious fun! What a great mentor!

    Seriously I dare anyone to try and be his mentor. That way lies pain and suffering and humiliation
    Last edited by Scott Taylor; 08-14-2018 at 03:07 PM.
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Taylor View Post
    No, but its fun to see someone try to be his mentor. Remember that time Captain America tried to be his mentor, then Peter took a bullet for him, and he and the rest of the Ultimates just left him to die? Then he got up, went to Aunt May's house and saved her and Gwen from Norman Osborn, dying in the process? Again without any help from any of the Ultimates? Hilarious fun! What a great mentor!

    Seriously I dare anyone to try and be his mentor. That way lies pain and suffering and humiliation
    If it makes you feel better, Aunt May called out Cap for that, and actually slapped him in the face while doing it. It shook him up so bad he quit, only to reemerge to try to stop Miles Morales from being the new Spider-Man because he blamed himself that badly for letting Peter die. Hell, Nick Fury felt guilty about it afterwards, to the point that he told Mary Jane she could go ahead with her expose on the forces behind Peter's death. After all, if the Ultimates (and Fury's Ultimate Avengers) hadn't been so caught up in the feud between Fury and Carol Danvers started by Gregory Stark setting them up to each believe that the other one was a traitor, let alone Carol being so focused on her vendetta with Fury that she apparently didn't bother sending anyone to deal with Norman Osborn and his fellow supervillain escapees, Peter might've lived. As it was, though, it was a fairly decent, if tragic, deconstruction of how a superhero mentorship would really work out, with the so-called mentor being more concerned with his own agenda and how his protégé might (or might not) be useful to that than with properly nurturing and supporting said protégé's development as a hero.
    The spider is always on the hunt.

  6. #36
    Astonishing Member boots's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Taylor View Post
    No, but its fun to see someone try to be his mentor. Remember that time Captain America tried to be his mentor, then Peter took a bullet for him, and he and the rest of the Ultimates just left him to die? Then he got up, went to Aunt May's house and saved her and Gwen from Norman Osborn, dying in the process? Again without any help from any of the Ultimates? Hilarious fun! What a great mentor!

    Seriously I dare anyone to try and be his mentor. That way lies pain and suffering and humiliation
    funny cos it's true
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  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntsman Spider View Post
    If it makes you feel better, Aunt May called out Cap for that, and actually slapped him in the face while doing it. It shook him up so bad he quit, only to reemerge to try to stop Miles Morales from being the new Spider-Man because he blamed himself that badly for letting Peter die. Hell, Nick Fury felt guilty about it afterwards, to the point that he told Mary Jane she could go ahead with her expose on the forces behind Peter's death. After all, if the Ultimates (and Fury's Ultimate Avengers) hadn't been so caught up in the feud between Fury and Carol Danvers started by Gregory Stark setting them up to each believe that the other one was a traitor, let alone Carol being so focused on her vendetta with Fury that she apparently didn't bother sending anyone to deal with Norman Osborn and his fellow supervillain escapees, Peter might've lived. As it was, though, it was a fairly decent, if tragic, deconstruction of how a superhero mentorship would really work out, with the so-called mentor being more concerned with his own agenda and how his protégé might (or might not) be useful to that than with properly nurturing and supporting said protégé's development as a hero.
    Plus Fury sort of allowed Miles to do his own thing and not get too involved with his life.

  8. #38
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    It depends.. If you're trying to advance the story, and have Peter age and progress, I like it and think it makes sense. One of the signs of an adult mindset is realizing that you can learn from other people and that you don't know everything. A maturing Peter would look at the failures in his past and ask how he can better himself, and realize a mentor could likely help.

    If we're talking main universe, original continuity, I don't think it works. He's not going to advance past the struggling, figuring it out phase of young adulthood (or not for very long, at least), and so won't reach the maturity required to humble himself and take a student position (again, maybe he will for a time, but not for long).

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntsman Spider View Post
    If it makes you feel better, Aunt May called out Cap for that, and actually slapped him in the face while doing it. It shook him up so bad he quit, only to reemerge to try to stop Miles Morales from being the new Spider-Man because he blamed himself that badly for letting Peter die. Hell, Nick Fury felt guilty about it afterwards, to the point that he told Mary Jane she could go ahead with her expose on the forces behind Peter's death. After all, if the Ultimates (and Fury's Ultimate Avengers) hadn't been so caught up in the feud between Fury and Carol Danvers started by Gregory Stark setting them up to each believe that the other one was a traitor, let alone Carol being so focused on her vendetta with Fury that she apparently didn't bother sending anyone to deal with Norman Osborn and his fellow supervillain escapees, Peter might've lived. As it was, though, it was a fairly decent, if tragic, deconstruction of how a superhero mentorship would really work out, with the so-called mentor being more concerned with his own agenda and how his protégé might (or might not) be useful to that than with properly nurturing and supporting said protégé's development as a hero.
    Yah it does! Bendis had a great knack for soap opera
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  10. #40
    Anyone. Anywhere.Anytime. Arsenal's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Taylor View Post
    No, but its fun to see someone try to be his mentor. Remember that time Captain America tried to be his mentor, then Peter took a bullet for him, and he and the rest of the Ultimates just left him to die? Then he got up, went to Aunt May's house and saved her and Gwen from Norman Osborn, dying in the process? Again without any help from any of the Ultimates? Hilarious fun! What a great mentor!

    Seriously I dare anyone to try and be his mentor. That way lies pain and suffering and humiliation
    Wasn't Cap completely against Peter even being a hero at all and only changed his stance when Peter took a bullet for him on a bridge?

  11. #41
    Mighty Member Inversed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Taylor View Post
    No, but its fun to see someone try to be his mentor. Remember that time Captain America tried to be his mentor, then Peter took a bullet for him, and he and the rest of the Ultimates just left him to die? Then he got up, went to Aunt May's house and saved her and Gwen from Norman Osborn, dying in the process? Again without any help from any of the Ultimates? Hilarious fun! What a great mentor!

    Seriously I dare anyone to try and be his mentor. That way lies pain and suffering and humiliation
    I wouldn't really consider Ultimate Cap that much of a mentor, considering that consisted of only one interaction he was forced to participate in which all he said was "You're not good enough k bye". Ultimate Tony at least cared and tried to someway teach him right in the previous issues.
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  12. #42

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    Nope. Spidey is a powerful, skiilled, and incredibly smart/resourceful hero. He's more than capable of thinking by himself.

  13. #43

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    It's an annoying idea I don't like.
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  14. #44
    Loony Scott Taylor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arsenal View Post
    Wasn't Cap completely against Peter even being a hero at all and only changed his stance when Peter took a bullet for him on a bridge?
    Yes, that is correct. Cap took a hardline stance that Peter should just wait until he was an adult, finish school and so on. Hard to argue against that notion, all things considered.

    In the MCU, Tony Stark may feel the same way. I was originally judgmental of him condoning and enabling Peter (a minor) to be a superhero. But in reality, it might have been to protect him from himself more than anything else. In Homecoming, Stark took away the suit and told him to stop - but Peter just put on his old suit and still went out there. Thats one part of Homecoming that really saved the movie for me.
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  15. #45
    Formerly Assassin Spider Huntsman Spider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Taylor View Post
    Yes, that is correct. Cap took a hardline stance that Peter should just wait until he was an adult, finish school and so on. Hard to argue against that notion, all things considered.

    In the MCU, Tony Stark may feel the same way. I was originally judgmental of him condoning and enabling Peter (a minor) to be a superhero. But in reality, it might have been to protect him from himself more than anything else. In Homecoming, Stark took away the suit and told him to stop - but Peter just put on his old suit and still went out there. Thats one part of Homecoming that really saved the movie for me.
    Same here on the last bit. The thing is, a mentor can help in some ways, but ultimately the impetus is on you yourself to decide whether you can do what it takes to be successful in whatever path you choose in life. That's something I think Peter would understand better than most, and why he does tend to be more self-reliant, as the impetus to be a hero came from within him in the first place. Sure, he could've used some guidance earlier on, but given how just about everybody and everything seemed to be set against him as Spider-Man (and even as Peter Parker, to a certain extent), I can understand him not wanting to get too dependent on people who could just as easily turn him away, cut him off, or even turn on him for whatever reason.
    The spider is always on the hunt.

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