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  1. #16
    Spectacular Member 2nd line g's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeGuy View Post
    That seems to be the case yes, I apologise. Tales of the Batman is first, then Legends.
    No apology needed. Thanks for the clarification. I’ll add both series to my wish list on IST.

  2. #17
    Incredible Member JoeGuy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graphic Autist View Post
    Not in your initial post, which is what I commented on. Go. Read your original post. No Tales of the fucking Batman was mentioned.
    Look Autist, I absolutely acknowledged my dumb brain lumped the two series titles together on my first post and I apologise for being confused.

    But my replies were not confusing and you still just told me I was wrong. There is a friendly way to correct something quickly and a hostile way of just saying someone's wrong and not clearing things up.

  3. #18
    Incredible Member Graphic Autist's Avatar
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    Maybe if you were friendlier in your initial accusation of me being confused, I would be friendlier. And you only acknowledged it ONE post before the one you quoted of me.

    You seem like a good guy, but you tried to make me look like an idiot.

  4. #19
    Spectacular Member Sandbagger77's Avatar
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    There are two regular hardcover series reprinting older Batman stories: Tales of the Batman and Legends of the Dark Knight. They're all creator-centred and while many of them reprint Bronze Age stories not all of them do. E.g. the Carmine Infantino book is mostly Silver Age while the J.J. Williams III one is all Post-Crisis. The one thing to be careful of is that because they're creator-centred there're sometimes story gaps in the collections, especially for the artist volumes.

    Finding a list is a bit tricky but this should help (ignore the ones without creator names in the title):

    http://comicbookdb.com/search.php?fo...archtype=Title

    http://comicbookdb.com/search.php?fo...archtype=Title

    The Legends of the Dark Knight line is reusing the title of a long-running Post-Crisis ongoing series which can cause confusion sometimes:

    http://comicbookdb.com/title.php?ID=366

    Why are some books published under the Tales of the Batman title and others under Legends of the Dark Knight? No idea and neither does anyone else, probably not even DC.
    Last edited by Sandbagger77; 08-19-2018 at 02:17 AM.

  5. #20
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    I really want a proper Bronze Age omnibus rather than having to navigate through these creator centric collections(where earlier volumes are out of print).

  6. #21
    Astonishing Member Captain Craig's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RamblingMan View Post
    I really want a proper Bronze Age omnibus rather than having to navigate through these creator centric collections(where earlier volumes are out of print).
    As do I. We do have the Brave & the Bold series being collected with vol.2 coming out next wee, to tide us over till then.
    However, since the understanding is DC will finish Golden Age (which they are only about 1/2 way through with vol. 6 solicited) before starting Silver Age and then doing Bronze Age we must be patient (like 2030?!).

    I've read that Golden Age Batman is something like 13/14 volumes.
    Anyone know how many volumes the Silver Age run of Omni's would likely be? Less I'd think since the era is shorter than GA. Then how many would Bronze Age be as well?
    "Freedom is the right of all sentient beings" - Optimus Prime

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Craig View Post
    As do I. We do have the Brave & the Bold series being collected with vol.2 coming out next wee, to tide us over till then.
    However, since the understanding is DC will finish Golden Age (which they are only about 1/2 way through with vol. 6 solicited) before starting Silver Age and then doing Bronze Age we must be patient (like 2030?!).

    I've read that Golden Age Batman is something like 13/14 volumes.
    Anyone know how many volumes the Silver Age run of Omni's would likely be? Less I'd think since the era is shorter than GA. Then how many would Bronze Age be as well?
    Should be getting to those Bronze Age Omnis about 2035! I get what they are trying to do. We are getting lots of Bronze Age books including Batman related books. We get stuff like Flash and Green Lantern in the Silver Age (which are now both done) and the Golden Age mostly focuses on the big 3. I can't complain about the variety but would be nice if they could start alternating.

  8. #23
    Spectacular Member 2nd line g's Avatar
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    So how many Bronze Age Batman titles were there? 3?

  9. #24
    Spectacular Member bob fett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2nd line g View Post
    So how many Bronze Age Batman titles were there? 3?
    What I remember he appeared in.
    Batman
    Detective
    Brave and the bold
    Batman family
    He also regularly appeared in Worlds finest.
    DC,please stop having Bizarro run your collections department.

  10. #25
    Incredible Member Graphic Autist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bob fett View Post
    What I remember he appeared in.
    Batman
    Detective
    Brave and the bold
    Batman family
    He also regularly appeared in Worlds finest.
    Batman and the Outsiders was a title in the early 80s.

    What I really want is a Denny O'Neil/Neal Adams Batman Omnibus.

    And off-subject, why is there no Byrne Supes Omnibus? The two I mentioned are the only things I care about DC doing. I have what I want from them at this point.

  11. #26
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
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    Would the Archie Goodwin collection (Tales of the Batman) count as Bronze Age?

    Certainly that was a very fine collection. From memory first third is good solid stuff, but at some point the stories move up a notch, and feature some of the best Batman stories from any era.

  12. #27
    Spectacular Member Sandbagger77's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackDaw View Post
    Would the Archie Goodwin collection (Tales of the Batman) count as Bronze Age?

    Certainly that was a very fine collection. From memory first third is good solid stuff, but at some point the stories move up a notch, and feature some of the best Batman stories from any era.
    Only the Manhunter stories with Walt Simonson in Detective Comics are Bronze Age - the rest are all Post-Crisis.

  13. #28
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandbagger77 View Post
    Only the Manhunter stories with Walt Simonson in Detective Comics are Bronze Age - the rest are all Post-Crisis.
    Cheers. I knew the stories covered a fair few years...and thought a few more might have fallen in Bronze Age. (Mind you my knowledge of Age definitions is practically non existent.)

  14. #29
    Spectacular Member Sandbagger77's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackDaw View Post
    Cheers. I knew the stories covered a fair few years...and thought a few more might have fallen in Bronze Age. (Mind you my knowledge of Age definitions is practically non existent.)
    No worries! Age definitions for DC can be flexible depending upon the title and often there is no single issue which can be said to mark a definite transition between the Ages but there are some clear rules:

    The Golden Age begins with Action Comics (1938) #1. Anyone who appeared as part of the Justice Society of America in All-Star Comics is a Golden Age character. Most GA series aside from the Big Three were cancelled by the end of the 1940s. There's then a sort-of intermediate age which also features some new sci-fi characters such as the Martian Manhunter, Adam Strange and Captain Comet. This is called The Atomic Age by some but the term hasn't become universally accepted yet.

    The Silver Age starts with Showcase (1956) #4 and the first appearance of Barry Allen as the Flash. This was followed by the first appearance of Hal Jordan as the new Green Lantern in 1959 and the formation of the Justice League of America in 1960. Again there aren't always clear transitions between the GA & SA but once Earth-Two and the Multiverse concept are introduced in 1961 by DC the division start to become clearer.

    The ending of the Silver Age and the beginning of the Bronze Age again varies by title but it's generically considered to be around 1970 when DC comics start to become more socially relevant. For example, the Denny O'Neil and Neal Adams run on Green Lantern/Green Arrow beginning in 1970 is the beginning of the Bronze Age for that title. The Bronze Age ends with Crisis on Infinite Earths in 1985-86.

    DC has decided upon endpoints for the Ages for some titles with their Golden/Silver/Bronze Age omnibus line which is helpful but they can be flexible for commercial reasons too. For example, the early Batgirl stories were published in the late 1960s in the Silver Age but most were in the Bronze Age so all of the stories ended up being collected under the Bronze Age banner. Also, some of the more modern comics of the late Bronze Age aren't being included as part of that line e.g. Wolfman & Perez's 1980 New Teen Titans series, Alan Moore's Swamp Thing beginning in 1983, although that may also be because the stories straddle both the Pre-Crisis and Post-Crisis eras.

  15. #30
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandbagger77 View Post
    No worries! Age definitions for DC can be flexible depending upon the title and often there is no single issue which can be said to mark a definite transition between the Ages but there are some clear rules:

    The Golden Age begins with Action Comics (1938) #1. Anyone who appeared as part of the Justice Society of America in All-Star Comics is a Golden Age character. Most GA series aside from the Big Three were cancelled by the end of the 1940s. There's then a sort-of intermediate age which also features some new sci-fi characters such as the Martian Manhunter, Adam Strange and Captain Comet. This is called The Atomic Age by some but the term hasn't become universally accepted yet.

    The Silver Age starts with Showcase (1956) #4 and the first appearance of Barry Allen as the Flash. This was followed by the first appearance of Hal Jordan as the new Green Lantern in 1959 and the formation of the Justice League of America in 1960. Again there aren't always clear transitions between the GA & SA but once Earth-Two and the Multiverse concept are introduced in 1961 by DC the division start to become clearer.

    The ending of the Silver Age and the beginning of the Bronze Age again varies by title but it's generically considered to be around 1970 when DC comics start to become more socially relevant. For example, the Denny O'Neil and Neal Adams run on Green Lantern/Green Arrow beginning in 1970 is the beginning of the Bronze Age for that title. The Bronze Age ends with Crisis on Infinite Earths in 1985-86.

    DC has decided upon endpoints for the Ages for some titles with their Golden/Silver/Bronze Age omnibus line which is helpful but they can be flexible for commercial reasons too. For example, the early Batgirl stories were published in the late 1960s in the Silver Age but most were in the Bronze Age so all of the stories ended up being collected under the Bronze Age banner. Also, some of the more modern comics of the late Bronze Age aren't being included as part of that line e.g. Wolfman & Perez's 1980 New Teen Titans series, Alan Moore's Swamp Thing beginning in 1983, although that may also be because the stories straddle both the Pre-Crisis and Post-Crisis eras.
    Thanks, useful summary...and I’ll probably remember “rough dates” separating the Ages now, because your explanation brings out the underlying logic.

    Will have to re-read Alan Moore run on Swamp Thing sometime...your comment on it spanning pre- and post-crisis reminded me how well he dealt with explaining the crisis within the run, it was easy to understand what was happening just by reading Swamp Thing comic itself, no need to look at other stuff.

    One of many good things Alan Moore did in that run, of course.

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