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  1. #46
    Extraordinary Member Güicho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBlackTerror View Post
    It does list artists for each episode and does go into a some—not great—detail about the other vehicles like the aquashuttle
    Was filmation using notes and visual concepts established ( but (maybe because of cost?) never produced) from TOS, or did they just make their own stuff up? Cause the design work, new ship concepts etc. what they came up with really seemed to fit the visual narrative of ST TOS.
    Not sure who designed ships?
    While other (more modern) shows, that are supposed to reflect the era, just seem to betray it.
    Last edited by Güicho; 02-17-2020 at 05:40 PM.

  2. #47
    Extraordinary Member Güicho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nate Grey View Post
    Wiki is saying he was actually replaced by Arex, not Chapel. It had been so long since I watched the show I forgot about him (Arex), I only remembered the catwoman (M'Ress) as the extra, animated-show-only character.

    Sounds like budget was a problem, so they could only afford Nichols part time (hence M'Ress voiced by Majel Barrett being at Uhura's post when Uhura was absent) and couldn't afford Koenig at all, hence Arex (voiced by James Doohan). Then again there's this:

    "Initially, Filmation was only going to use the voices of William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Doohan and Barrett. Doohan and Barrett would also perform the voices of Sulu and Uhura. Nimoy refused to voice Spock in the series unless Nichelle Nichols and George Takei were added to the cast, claiming that Sulu and Uhura were proof of the ethnic diversity of the 23rd century and should not be recast. Nimoy also took this stand as a matter of principle, as he knew of the financial troubles many of his Star Trek co-stars were facing after cancellation of the series. According to Scheimer, when Nimoy pointed out that the casting would cut the only two minority actors from the series, "We were horrified at our unintended slight, made all the worse because we were the one studio who had been championing diversity in its output." Koenig was not forgotten, as Filmation were able to assuage Nimoy's complaints on his account by buying a script from Koenig for one episode ("The Infinite Vulcan")."

    So the only reason we got Nichols and Takei is thanks to Nimoy standing up for them. Interesting. And at least Koenig got something.
    Yeah thank Nimoy for pointing it out, and holding them to it, as Filmation readily acknowledges. and in the end were willing to pay extra, to make sure they were represented. Budget was a huge concern as American Sat Morn. TV Animation had tiny budgets, expected to produce a more realistic looking setting on the same cost as a Yogi Bear cartoon) and bring things in at minimum. Paying "known" actors was likely where most of the money in this production ended up going.
    Truth is that Filmation - " were the one studio who had been championing diversity in its output."

    As CRL indicates

    Quote Originally Posted by Comic-Reader Lad View Post

    - They made a commitment to diversity way before it was the thing to do. They had the first African-American animated character in an ongoing series with Pete Jones from the 1969 Hardy Boys animated series. Of course, they are well-known for their long-running hit, Fat Albert and the Cosby Kids. Other diverse characters starred or co-starred in Superstretch and Microwoman (a segment of Tarzan and the Super 7), Space Sentinels, live action's Ark II, and others.]
    Last edited by Güicho; 02-18-2020 at 08:43 AM.

  3. #48
    Extraordinary Member Güicho's Avatar
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    Intresting article here - http://www.danhausertrek.com/AnimatedSeries/Bgd.html

    Apparently Filmation in pursuing the cartoon rights had pitched a "cadet" themed show, with apparently each lead having a young counterpart-

    Yet Gene Roddenberry and D. C. Fontana wanted it for potential prime-time, and kept it just the adults.





    I do love the mustachioed Scotty.

    Quote Originally Posted by Güicho View Post
    Does the book list which episodes were re-purposed never used original series scripts?
    Answered....

    This new Star Trek show had a lot going for it. Many of the original writers from the original series came back to write new episodes and sequels to their live action episodes. These included "More Tribbles, More Troubles" by David Gerrold which was a sequel to his "The Trouble With Tribbles" episode. Chuck Menville and Len Janson wrote "Once Upon a Planet", a sequel to "Shore Leave" written by Theodore Sturgeon. Stephan Kandel, author of two Harry Mudd episodes of the original series, returned to pen an animated Mudd tale, "Mudd's Passion". Even actor Walter Koenig, who had portrayed Ensign Pavel Chekov on the original series, wrote a script, "The Infinite Vulcan", which tied in to the original series episode "Space Seed." D. C. Fontana, who had written some of the most memorable episodes of the original Star Trek series, contributed a script which would be recognized as one of the best Trek stories written, "Yesteryear". Fontana selected writers that would be able to maintain the quality and consistency of the Star Trek concepts
    Last edited by Güicho; 02-22-2020 at 02:48 PM.

  4. #49

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    Too bad that Filmation never collaborated with Marvel on anything. Throughout the 70s there seemed to be ripe opportunities. Avengers (and all the solo icons); Defenders (including Dr. Strange); Heroes for Hire; updated Spider-Man show; X-Men; Oh well.
    Last edited by Hypestyle; 02-22-2020 at 07:40 PM.

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