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  1. #61
    Mighty Member kjn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Z View Post
    But that is equality as well. It shows that women are every bit as capable of strength and leadership and doesn't treat strong, intelligent women as something to be feared.
    In a way, it is, but instead of looking at trends and groups, like most work for equality does and which most feminist theory is focused on, Wonder Woman works on the individual and exemplar level.

    Because other people are most assuredly not equal to Wonder Woman. They can teach her things, they can help her, sometimes they can save the day. But only Wonder Woman can save the world, to borrow Steve Trevor's words from the movie. Wonder Woman is not a woman who shows how to effectively deal with sexism, but a woman who should act entirely free from sexism, because she was not raised in a patriarchal and sexist society.

    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Z View Post
    To be clear on this, was your issue with the rightful king story that it got too much focus or that it was used at all?
    A bit of both, and focus is really not the right word, now that I think about it. It's more of an underlying assumption or premise.

    What is clear from Black Panther is that Wakanda was a society that, while utopian on the surface, had lots of fissure lines and conflicts. The Jabari tribe was one example, Nakia's active work outside Wakanda is another one, the way the country dissolved into civil war over Killmonger is perhaps the most clear example. All of those conflicts were part of Wakanda before Killmonger took the throne, but are magically resolved when T'Challa regains the throne. While I can understand the need for neat and simple solutions in superhero movies, this was far too neat and simple.

  2. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjn View Post
    In a way, it is, but instead of looking at trends and groups, like most work for equality does and which most feminist theory is focused on, Wonder Woman works on the individual and exemplar level.

    Because other people are most assuredly not equal to Wonder Woman. They can teach her things, they can help her, sometimes they can save the day. But only Wonder Woman can save the world, to borrow Steve Trevor's words from the movie. Wonder Woman is not a woman who shows how to effectively deal with sexism, but a woman who should act entirely free from sexism, because she was not raised in a patriarchal and sexist society.




    A bit of both, and focus is really not the right word, now that I think about it. It's more of an underlying assumption or premise.

    What is clear from Black Panther is that Wakanda was a society that, while utopian on the surface, had lots of fissure lines and conflicts. The Jabari tribe was one example, Nakia's active work outside Wakanda is another one, the way the country dissolved into civil war over Killmonger is perhaps the most clear example. All of those conflicts were part of Wakanda before Killmonger took the throne, but are magically resolved when T'Challa regains the throne. While I can understand the need for neat and simple solutions in superhero movies, this was far too neat and simple.
    And none of that is a bad thing. Wonder Woman is a character with very interesting and important topics. And more than once she has proven her potential. Whatever they like it or not. She is right now the strongest, best received part of the DCEU. So they shouldn't be ignoring her or trying to nerf her like they do in comics and outside of them. They are in no position to be picky.

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