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  1. #16
    Astonishing Member Revolutionary_Jack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by boots View Post
    not knocking this post, but “views” don’t = “reads”

    it’s also why good marketers don’t buy the view count on their facebook ads as proof that it’s working
    I agree. My point was that I had moved on. I took the views as a small consolation and decided "I was allowed to have my say, I said it, and if no one responds that's fair". Now someone has responded, and someone just has to be "that guy" about it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    An issue with this kind of argument is that it's not about arguing for the merits, but about countering the viewpoints of others.
    The OP does both. Here's the thing is if you thought the marriage was wrong and that removing the marriage was correct, then it's a huge problem is the Wedding issue feels more in-character and overall far better written than the ones that remove it, on both a story and art level.

  2. #17
    More eldritch than thou Venomous Mask's Avatar
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    Does anyone else feel that the conversation during Peter's dream in the annual to be equally funny and accurate:



    I mean, Captain America and the pastor both make good points; the Daily Bugle would indeed pay alot of money for pictures of Spider-Man's wedding, and such commercialization of the love affairs of major public figures (MJ was a very popular model at the time in the comics) is a perfect example of how increasingly in the US, nearly everything once deemed sacred seems to be warped so that someone can make big bucks off of it. Doc Ock's opinion seems to be that of a person of an older generation who still remembers when such things weddings, even among celebrities, were truly deemed as sacred and not something that should be flashed around like just another big commercial event. Hobgoblin's simple statement seems to reflect a cynicism towards the new culture, embodied at the time by the up and coming gen x, which was very much critical of the West's increasingly plastic culture while making little serious attempt to try to turn things back.
    "I should describe my known nature as tripartite, my interests consisting of three parallel and disassociated groups; a) love of the strange and the fantastic, b) love of abstract truth and scientific logic, c) love of the ancient and the permanent. Sundry combinations of these strains will probably account for my...odd tastes, and eccentricities."

  3. #18
    Astonishing Member Revolutionary_Jack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Venomous Mask View Post
    Does anyone else feel that the conversation during Peter's dream in the annual to be equally funny and accurate:
    Dreams have a way of speaking the truth.

    I mean, Captain America and the pastor both make good points; the Daily Bugle would indeed pay alot of money for pictures of Spider-Man's wedding, and such commercialization of the love affairs of major public figures (MJ was a very popular model at the time in the comics) is a perfect example of how increasingly in the US, nearly everything once deemed sacred seems to be warped so that someone can make big bucks off of it. Doc Ock's opinion seems to be that of a person of an older generation who still remembers when such things weddings, even among celebrities, were truly deemed as sacred and not something that should be flashed around like just another big commercial event. Hobgoblin's simple statement seems to reflect a cynicism towards the new culture, embodied at the time by the up and coming gen x, which was very much critical of the West's increasingly plastic culture while making little serious attempt to try to turn things back.
    What's funny about the dream is that it's so different from the actual wedding. The dream wedding is in a church with a pastor and organ and so on. But Peter and Mary Jane actually got married on the steps of City Hall officiated by a judge. In other words, they had a common people's wedding and in fact a very secular wedding. So I think that scene is deliberately meant to comment on "What weddings are supposed to be".

    I see so many people describing the Wedding Annual and talk about Peter going to Church but they are actually confusing this dream scene with the actual wedding.

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