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  1. #1246
    Mighty Member danielsan52's Avatar
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    I still want Derrick Beacon to show up.
    I'll meet you by the third pyramid. We'll meet in Mesopotamia

  2. #1247
    Sarveśām Svastir Bhavatu Devaishwarya's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by marhawkman View Post
    Real-world forms of discrimination get brought up occasionally, but they're the exception rather than the rule.
    Yup. Mainly because most X-writers:
    1: Have a much larger/more important story/plot idea to put through that usually has little to do with Real-world racism/oppression.
    2: And even if they do have something to say...they enfold it into the story they're telling more as a underscore/emphasis point (as with Frenzy above.)
    We are MUTANT...One people. One tribe. One family...Krakoa, FOREVER!!!

  3. #1248
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntsman Spider View Post
    Naturally, because the people writing the stories, by and large, aren't necessarily familiar with real-world discrimination and marginalization to begin with --- and sometimes, it can really show.
    This right here.

    Funny, because I remember the 90s writers do it quite a bit though. Itís what got me started ok X-Men in the first place.

  4. #1249
    Mighty Member dkrook's Avatar
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    I for one, don't even care if there is never a race issue plot that brings in Bishop. Just as long as we can get a good story layered with action and drama. Let's start with this. Part of me is cheering on all the revealing sexual assault allegations going on with comic veterans right now. I see this as a means to an end. The prevalence of white male presence in the upper positions of influence is directly to blame for the lack of well written black male heroes not just in X-Men but Marvel comics as well.

  5. #1250
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkrook View Post
    I for one, don't even care if there is never a race issue plot that brings in Bishop. Just as long as we can get a good story layered with action and drama. Let's start with this. Part of me is cheering on all the revealing sexual assault allegations going on with comic veterans right now. I see this as a means to an end. The prevalence of white male presence in the upper positions of influence is directly to blame for the lack of well written black male heroes not just in X-Men but Marvel comics as well.
    Bingo, spot on. And sometimes it is unbias but other times it's completely bias. Every white writer should always have in their mind how can i diversify this. I know no creator of color doesn't ever not think i need at least one white character in this or more than just black people to add diversity. Sometimes we go through with it and sometimes we consciously decide f it but i know it is ALWAYS a thought at some point in the process. I think Percy's X-force is a good example. I just don't think diversity on the team ever crossed his mind not such much that it was a conscious avoidance.
    Last edited by jwatson; 08-01-2020 at 11:47 AM.
    Don't let anyone else hold the candle that lights the way to your future because only you can sustain the flame.

  6. #1251
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    And i don't get why people are assuming black means African American that is confusing to me. There are jamacians, africans, afro latinos, hell america consider a one drop rule being black. So i don't quite understand this black being associated strictly with african americans. its confusing.
    Don't let anyone else hold the candle that lights the way to your future because only you can sustain the flame.

  7. #1252
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwatson View Post
    Bingo, spot on. And sometimes it is unbias but other times it's completely bias. Every white writer should always have in their mind how can i diversify this. I know no creator of color doesn't ever not think i need at least one white character in this or more than just black people to add diversity. Sometimes we go through with it and sometimes we consciously decide f it but i know it is ALWAYS a thought at some point in the process. I think Percy's X-force is a good example. I just don't think diversity on the team ever crossed his mind not such much that it was a conscious avoidance.
    Most writers of color and LGBTQIA have ZERO issues offering a diverse roster in their stories. They will just do it if the story allows it.

    I mean it might be harder to do that with say Black Panther (if he stays in Wakanda) and Luke Cage (at times) but everyone else-it should not be an issue.

    And i don't get why people are assuming black means African American that is confusing to me. There are jamacians, africans, afro latinos, hell america consider a one drop rule being black. So i don't quite understand this black being associated strictly with african americans. its confusing.
    Because in the USA African Americans are the MAIN ones complaining and screaming for justice and acceptance. While the others do as well-it's rarely magnified beyond the respective countries those people come from.

    Most don't know about the stuff that goes on in parts of African with children soldiers and what is done to African girls.

    And don't get me started on the war between African Americans and Africans-that is a thread by itself.

    Yet all those folks are black like you said.

  8. #1253
    Incredible Member Micabe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skyvolt2000 View Post
    Most writers of color and LGBTQIA have ZERO issues offering a diverse roster in their stories. They will just do it if the story allows it.

    I mean it might be harder to do that with say Black Panther (if he stays in Wakanda) and Luke Cage (at times) but everyone else-it should not be an issue.



    Because in the USA African Americans are the MAIN ones complaining and screaming for justice and acceptance. While the others do as well-it's rarely magnified beyond the respective countries those people come from.

    Most don't know about the stuff that goes on in parts of African with children soldiers and what is done to African girls.

    And don't get me started on the war between African Americans and Africans-that is a thread by itself.

    Yet all those folks are black like you said.
    You got me to thinking about your last statement so I Googled just that and found this PDF.
    Last edited by Micabe; 08-01-2020 at 01:43 PM.

  9. #1254
    Extraordinary Member BroHomo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkrook View Post
    Part of me is cheering on all the revealing sexual assault allegations going on with comic veterans right now. I see this as a means to an end. The prevalence of white male presence in the upper positions of influence is directly to blame for the lack of well written black male heroes not just in X-Men but Marvel comics as well.
    Shit Dude, its a conflicting AF feeling buuuut Same here. Not just in comics but maybe we'd see a break up then eventually a more diverse presence within the upper echelon in every form

    Quote Originally Posted by jwatson View Post
    And i don't get why people are assuming black means African American that is confusing to me. There are jamacians, africans, afro latinos, hell america consider a one drop rule being black. So i don't quite understand this black being associated strictly with african americans. its confusing.
    Who are the people assuming? my bad if its been explained
    Quote Originally Posted by skyvolt2000 View Post
    And don't get me started on the war between African Americans and Africans-that is a thread by itself.
    Bruh I've been noticing my Mom+some older members of my family try to say some slick shit about 'Africans' 'Jamaicans' etc. and Im like Whaaat?
    GrindrStone(D)

  10. #1255
    Grizzled Veteran Jackraow21's Avatar
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    I enjoy Bishop as a character. Would’ve loved to see him on this X-Force team but in the main timeline (not an alt U)...

    B8714CE2-6725-4BC0-8599-737B8FAD1C6D.jpg

    Maybe sub X-23 for Archangel since he’s kind of had his arc in Uncanny X-Force. Could say the same about Psylocke, but now that she’s Kwannon it works. She’s an assassin. Add Forge and Sage as tech support/command and control and it’s perfect IMO.

    I’d have Cable (the adult version) wield his new sword though, and channel his TK through it like he used to do his Psimitar. That way Bishop can carry the heavy gun ordinance without either of them being redundant.

  11. #1256
    Mighty Member Zelena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkrook View Post
    I for one, don't even care if there is never a race issue plot that brings in Bishop. Just as long as we can get a good story layered with action and drama. Let's start with this. Part of me is cheering on all the revealing sexual assault allegations going on with comic veterans right now. I see this as a means to an end. The prevalence of white male presence in the upper positions of influence is directly to blame for the lack of well written black male heroes not just in X-Men but Marvel comics as well.
    I don’t see the connection about the sexual assault allegations going on with some comic veterans and the fact that these comic veterans are white. What? A sort of divine justice must fall on them because they are white? Black authors can never do wrong?

  12. #1257
    Extraordinary Member BroHomo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zelena View Post
    I donít see the connection about the sexual assault allegations going on with some comic veterans and the fact that these comic veterans are white. What? A sort of divine justice must fall on them because they are white? Black authors can never do wrong?
    Not a lotta Black authors for them to be in the position of doing the wrong thing :/
    GrindrStone(D)

  13. #1258
    Fantastic Member Kingdom X's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BroHomo View Post
    Bruh I've been noticing my Mom+some older members of my family try to say some slick shit about 'Africans' 'Jamaicans' etc. and Im like Whaaat?
    My family is Caribbean and trust me, the slick comments go both ways.

  14. #1259
    Formerly Assassin Spider Huntsman Spider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zelena View Post
    I donít see the connection about the sexual assault allegations going on with some comic veterans and the fact that these comic veterans are white. What? A sort of divine justice must fall on them because they are white? Black authors can never do wrong?
    The connection is that when you have the upper echelons of leadership in an industry, those who make most if not all the major decisions as to who or what gets pushed forward or phased into the background, consist (almost) exclusively of straight white men, you get at best blind spots and at worst outright biases around race, nationality, gender identity, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, etc. that block people who aren't straight white men from opportunities for advancement in the industry. Hell, there's a Business Insider article (that's been followed up by some more comic-focused news sites, including CBR) where it's admitted that Marvel really did consider stripping Miles Morales --- one of the most successful and popular of the nonwhite legacy characters introduced in the last decade --- of his claim to the Spider-Man mantle and essentially downgrading him.

    Now, that push to downgrade Miles obviously fell through, but the fact that it was even being seriously considered among the upper echelons of Marvel execs and/or editorial is a case study in why greater inclusivity and representation is needed at that level. And yes, when you have the upper echelons of talent and leadership in an industry consist (almost) exclusively of a class or group that is used to certain amenities and privileges as a norm, it is (or can be) very hard to get them to address issues of mistreatment or alienation that (seem to) primarily affect those who are not in that privileged class or group, especially when it comes to holding members of the same privileged class or group accountable for whatever role(s) they've played in said mistreatment and alienation.
    Last edited by Huntsman Spider; 08-01-2020 at 02:20 PM.
    The spider is always on the hunt.

  15. #1260
    Mighty Member dkrook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntsman Spider View Post
    The connection is that when you have the upper echelons of leadership in an industry, those who make most if not all the major decisions as to who or what gets pushed forward or phased into the background, consist (almost) exclusively of straight white men, you get at best blind spots and at worst outright biases around race, nationality, gender identity, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, etc. that block people who aren't straight white men from opportunities for advancement in the industry. Hell, there's a Business Insider article (that's been followed up by some more comic-focused news sites, including CBR) where it's admitted that Marvel really did consider stripping Miles Morales --- one of the most successful and popular of the nonwhite legacy characters introduced in the last decade --- of his claim to the Spider-Man mantle and essentially downgrading him.

    Now, that push to downgrade Miles obviously fell through, but the fact that it was even being seriously considered among the upper echelons of Marvel execs and/or editorial is a case study in why greater inclusivity and representation is needed at that level. And yes, when you have the upper echelons of talent and leadership in an industry consist (almost) exclusively of a class or group that is used to certain amenities and privileges as a norm, it is (or can be) very hard to get them to address issues of mistreatment or alienation that (seem to) primarily affect those who are not in that privileged class or group, especially when it comes to holding members of the same privileged class or group accountable for whatever role(s) they've played in said mistreatment and alienation.
    Spoken with eloquence, insightful precision, and most importantly TRUTH! Thanks for the timely response fam! BTW agreed 110%!

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