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  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by DochaDocha View Post
    To an extent, yeah. These days, much of the time when someone voice acts a role that doesn't represent his or her race, the actor uses such a bland accent that it becomes hard to tell. They try to avoid situations like Apu from The Simpsons, which seemed socially acceptable in 1989 but not so much in 2019. Regardless of the motivation, if you try to nail a specific accent or dialect, and then cast someone who is non-representative of it, you're going to draw some negative attention. If you want your character to have a thick accent like Jian-Yang from Silicon Valley, and then you get a non-Cantonese person to do that accent, there's going to be some fallout.

    My point is more of the opposite approach. Would having an Indian actor voicing Apu be better received with a natural Indian accent or with the "bland accent" they would use for another ethnicity?


    Or to get to the subject of the thread will a minority actor cast as Superman require a different approach to the character or could you write the script prior to casting and have it work equally well regardless of if you cast Brad Pitt or Denzel Washington?

  2. #152
    Incredible Member stargazer01's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ascended View Post
    I know Doctor Who is a woman now, but how are CW Superman and Luke Skywalker changed? If the guy playing Superman isn't white, he looks it.

    EDIT: nevermind, I just saw what the point being made was.

    And you can't even hate on Who. Way back in classic Who it was said that some of his prior regenerations were female, we just didn't see them. And since the Doctor is always a different person, making him a woman is no bigger a change than making him a ginger (which still hasn't happened, despite his wanting it to!)



    .
    I really doubt that. Pretty sure we have seen all his regenerations and he was never a female before. I'm not Who lore expert, but I hate the female Doctor idea. To me it's a whole different character and purely stunt casting to get bigger ratings.

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ascended View Post
    On the issue of racebending as a whole.......the fact is new characters struggle to catch on, and the C-listers who are PoC or LBGT or whatever aren't in a much better position despite having some history behind them. Since the audience wants the classic names far more than anything else, if comics are to achieve representation some racebending might be required. Call it a necessary evil if you will, but the idea of "just make new characters!" doesn't sell outside of the rare exception
    I have to disagree.

    That implies that in order for POC/LGBT characters to have an audience, they need to 'steal', for a lack of a better term, the white, straight character's identity.

    In essence, that's not only rings of the soft bigotry of low expectations, but also denotes a lack of creativity, patience and skill on the part of the writer.

    Black Panther didn't become an A-lister because he stole some white character's identity, but because he had his own development and storylines.

    Luke Cage, the same way.

    Cyborg, the same way.

    Storm, the same way.

    I could go on and on and on.

    Even inside the same stories, John Stewart didn't become probably the most recognized Green Lantern because they painted Hal black.

    Miles isn't racebender Peter Parker. He's his on character.

    The same way, we can have Val-Zod be his own Superman.

    What you're asking for is shortcuts.

    Instead of taking the time to introduce and develop into great characters, as so many have been before, who happen to be POC/LGBT, they should just straight up swap the races/gender/sexuality of already established characters, and ride on their coatails.

    You know what this leads? People referring to them as "female Thor". Or "black Wally West".

    Their identity, being forever tied to the one they stole it from, just to fill a diversity quota.

    And that, in itself, is quite sad.
    Last edited by GodofBoredom; Yesterday at 01:19 PM.

  4. #154
    Death becomes you Osiris-Rex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stargazer01 View Post
    I really doubt that. Pretty sure we have seen all his regenerations and he was never a female before. I'm not Who lore expert, but I hate the female Doctor idea. To me it's a whole different character and purely stunt casting to get bigger ratings.
    How is being a woman a different character than being a different man? Isn't that like saying a different man also a different character? Dr. Who looked different each time. It's just the features are softer this time.
    Just like a dark skinned Superman would still be Superman. Maybe in world no one even notices that Superman has dark skin. Race isn't a thing in that universe. Just because a black actor is cast as Superman doesn't
    mean that they have to have Superman be a black man with all the experiences a black man has in our world. Just like no one notices that Perry White in universe is black. Perry White never says "As a black man I...."

  5. #155
    Astonishing Member DochaDocha's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Clark View Post
    My point is more of the opposite approach. Would having an Indian actor voicing Apu be better received with a natural Indian accent or with the "bland accent" they would use for another ethnicity?


    Or to get to the subject of the thread will a minority actor cast as Superman require a different approach to the character or could you write the script prior to casting and have it work equally well regardless of if you cast Brad Pitt or Denzel Washington?
    With regard to Apu, I think yes and no. I think a lot of people who hate Apu are especially annoyed that it's a white guy doing his impression of an Indian guy. It's a bunch of white creators and a white actor doing a stereotype of an Indian guy, which has negative consequences on how Indian people are perceived, all the while the employment went to a non-Indian guy. Essentially, the Indian community gets burdened with all of the negative consequences, but not a single member of the community gets to benefit from it. On the other hand, it's not like people are happy to see a "one of their own" benefit by perpetuating stereotypes. If for some reason Sixteen Candles were remade and they made no updates to Long Duk Dong, I don't think people who hate the character are going to take any solace in the fact that Gedde Watanabe's successor (or Watanabe himself) got exposure and money for doing it. He'd be called a sellout by many. Still, as offensive as they found Long Duk Dong, that's nothing compared to Mickey Rooney's character in Breakfast at Tiffany's. So in short, I'd say casting the person of the right race to play a bad character doesn't absolve all the sins, but it's still not as bad as getting someone of another race to black-/yellow-/brown-/redface.

    If Apu were played by an Indian actor, and the character was a second-generation Indian-American with a midwestern accent and happened to run a Kwik-E-Mart, I think the backlash for the character would be limited to why does he stereotypically work at a convenience store, and little else, nothing like what happened in recent years.

    I know demographics of Kansas are changing, with the direction headed toward more diversity, but rural Kansas is approximately 90% white, and was even more so back when Superman was initially given his Kansas/middle America upbringing. I think that's about as white (American) as you can get, and that's before you consider whatever perspective as poor, Jewish immigrants Siegel and Shuster wanted to inject in their early stories. The only way you can make him whiter would be if you had him crash land in Scandanavia or some region of the world that's nearly homogenously white. If you cast him with someone like Denzel, maybe I'd have him crash in a rural place that had a different demographic profile. In general, though, I'm not comfortable about how the argument for racebending white characters often revolves around how the character's whiteness isn't (allegedly) essential to the story. I find those arguments often end up resorting to cherrypicking arguments.

    As far as diversity and inclusion in media are concerned, there are real problems in Hollywood. Sometimes, it's effin' overt, like casting Jim Sturgess as the lead for 21. There's no good excuse for s**t like that, and trying to appease the critics by casting Aaron Yoo and Liza Lapira after initially announcing that they were going to cast a white blackjack team, with maybe an Asian woman (more racism, but a topic for another day) was really weak. I even think the casting of Jon Foo in Tekken, and possibly even Henry Golding in Crazy Rich Asians was influenced by Hollywood's bias/racism. I'm just not on the side of racebending characters like Superman.

    I know my examples are strictly limited to Asian representation, but I just don't feel like speaking on other someone's behalf other than my own.

  6. #156
    Ultimate Member Ascended's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stargazer01 View Post
    I really doubt that. Pretty sure we have seen all his regenerations and he was never a female before. I'm not Who lore expert, but I hate the female Doctor idea. To me it's a whole different character and purely stunt casting to get bigger ratings.
    I'm not an expert on classic Who either, but my wife is a big fan (the 4th is her favorite), and apparently it's been said in a couple lines of dialogue. Just in passing; it's not a big thing. I could be wrong but I've also heard a few other classic fans say the same thing.

    Even if this isn't true, I fail to see how the Doctor regenerating into a woman is a big deal. Actors have changed age by decades, even become Scottish, to say nothing of changes in behavior and personality. If the Doctor is a woman now, who gives a damn? It's a new Doctor. New Doctors are always different.

    EDIT: sorry for adding to a long post, but I just remembered a detail. In classic Who, they handled the Regeneration a little differently; there was no limit on the number you got, they weren't kept track of by the characters themselves (not to the degree they are now). So according to new Who, we've seen all his regenerations, but according to classic Who, we haven't.

    Quote Originally Posted by GodofBoredom View Post
    I have to disagree.

    That implies that in order for POC/LGBT characters to have an audience, they need to 'steal', for a lack of a better term, the white, straight character's identity.
    Not sure how you got this from what I said at all.

    New characters usually *dont* do well. C-listers usually *don't* do well. It doesn't matter what they look like or who they sleep with or what church they go to. That's about as objective as it gets in comics since we have sales data and cancellation announcements to prove it. And yes, obviously exceptions exist, and thank the gods for them. Hell, most of them are on my pull list. But they are exceptions, not the rule. So if solo books with new characters and C-listers usually don't do well, you're only options (that I can think of anyway) are team books, supporting characters and legacies, and race bending.

    I dislike race bending. It stinks of tokenism and stunt gimmicks. It's problematic at best. And I'd rather see alternatives to it. But looking at the business realities where alternatives are few, I can't write it off completely. I don't like it, but I can recognize that there might be times when it's the lesser evil.

    Is it a shortcut? Yes. But "make good characters!" isn't a strategy that actually works most of the time. For every Ms. Marvel (legacy!) there's a hundred different New Age heroes who never caught on despite being well crafted.
    Last edited by Ascended; Yesterday at 07:44 PM.
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