Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Spectacular Member Yohei72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    109

    Default "TKO Studios wants to revolutionize comics... and it just might do it"

    Yeah, yeah, we've heard that kind of thing before. But this article/review by Oliver Sava does actually make it sound exciting.

    https://aux.avclub.com/tko-studios-w...jus-1832213585

    when TKO Studios debuted at the end of last year with some genuinely ambitious ideas for publishing and distribution, the industry took notice. TKO says it wants to be “the first modern comic book company,” meaning it wants to create a publishing and distribution model that is tailored to how contemporary audiences engage with media. In regards to publishing, TKO is experimenting with a binge-reading model, giving readers complete six-issue stories all at once in three different formats: digital copies, box sets of single issues, and paperback collections. The first issues of each series are all available to download on TKO’s website, making it easier to commit to the multi-issue model by giving readers and retailers a free sample...

    TKO’s CEO and co-publisher, Salvatore Simeone, comes from the world of tech start-ups, and while the details of TKO’s seed money aren’t public, the company has enough funding that it can handle distribution itself and bring in big-name creators for its titles. The distribution angle is perhaps the most intriguing...

    TKO is side-stepping Diamond entirely, putting a retailer portal on its website where comic-shops can order books. TKO offers retailers a 50 percent discount on all purchases with free shipping to U.S. stores. International vendors pay for shipping, which varies on a case-by-case basis depending on weight. Books shipped in the U.S. typically arrive within two to five business days instead of weeks or months—eight to 12 business days for international shipping—and TKO uses its Twitter feed to promote stores that stock its books. Even though the publisher sells directly to readers, it recognizes how important it is to have its titles in comic shops and the role they play in marketing to new customers.
    And they've got some impressive creators on board... Garth Ennis, Jeff Lemire, and most exciting to my mind, Joshua Dysart. I'm a big evangelist for his Harbinger and Imperium runs at Valiant, but he doesn't actually publish that much, and I always sit up and take notice when he comes out with something new.

    Sava gives their books high marks all around. Anyone else read any of these, and/or seen copies at their LCS?

  2. #2
    All-New Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Posts
    25

    Default

    The other co-publisher, Tze Chun, is a TV writer, and wrote several episodes of Once Upon a Time and Gotham, among other things. And he is actually a competent comics writer as well, proving that on two TKO-published titles: the pulpy adventure The Fearsome Doctor Fang, and western 7 Deadly Sins. Both Garth Ennis and Steve Epting have never been better than on Sara.

    And no superheroes. TKO is not going to indulge in that genre, or so they've promised.

  3. #3
    All-New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Too bad, the shipping costs to Europe are massive

  4. #4
    Mighty Member Dark-Flux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    1,993

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LukasG View Post
    Too bad, the shipping costs to Europe are massive
    Various stores in the UK are now stocking them if thats any cheaper for you?
    I got mine from OKComics. I see FP are taking orders too.

  5. #5
    All-New Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    16

    Talking

    Really? Thanks! Gonna check it out
    What TKO is trying to do with publishing --> binge reading (6 issues releasing immediately) coule be disruptive for the industry and I really hope they succeed

  6. #6
    Mighty Member adkal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,452

    Default

    I hope they succeed, too.

    Somewhat linked to this, it has long been suggested doing arcs as 'seasons' (much like what the All Star books originally seemed to be) but there is a lot of resistance in the industry to something like that.

  7. #7
    Spectacular Member Yohei72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by adkal View Post
    I hope they succeed, too.

    Somewhat linked to this, it has long been suggested doing arcs as 'seasons' (much like what the All Star books originally seemed to be) but there is a lot of resistance in the industry to something like that.
    Where in particular is this resistance coming from? Is it coming from the creators, the publishing executives, the retailers?

    It seems to me this is an absolutely necessary step if comics are going to survive and thrive as a mainstream entertainment medium (and they'll have to be at a lower price-point, too, at least in digital form). This is just my amateur and highly inexpert impression, but it seems to me there are two possible futures: 1) DC and Marvel and other more or less "major" publishers evolve to a more arc-focused, binge-reading model at lower prices that's mainly consumed digitally, or 2) readership just keeps sinking lower and lower until the comics publishers collapse. Of course, local comics shops, the bread and butter of the industry for 30 or so years, will gnash their teeth at the suggestion that the future is digital. I'm a physical book man myself. But I don't see an alternative.

  8. #8
    Spectacular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    204

    Default

    I am struggling to see how this isnt just an OGN publisher, of which there are many already, just packaging their OGNs two ways rather than one.

    Part of buying floppies is the wait between issues. The cliffhanger and the wait for the next issue is the experience people pay for. Or for those that prefer book format then there is the trade. There seems to be a lot of wooly theory behind what is just repackaging a trade in a box.

    Line up looks good though - lets hope its a success

  9. #9
    Spectacular Member Yohei72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    109

    Default

    Interesting points, Iron Chimp - that's an angle I hadn't considered and is worth mulling over. But as for this...

    Quote Originally Posted by iron chimp View Post
    The cliffhanger and the wait for the next issue is the experience people pay for.
    That's just the thing. Most people in the Netflix age aren't paying for that experience and aren't interested in doing so, which is part of the problem with the state of the industry. I'm a Wednesday Warrior, but even I generally prefer reading books in trade when I can, given the long-form, serialized storytelling that most comics use these days - I often can't remember where the story left off by the time I pick up next month's issue. I buy floppies that I'm excited enough about to not want to wait for months to get the tpb.

    I don't know much about these OGN publishers you mention - how many of them are publishing ongoing stories, like TKO is doing? And with major creators from the big time like Ennis and Lemire?

  10. #10
    Spectacular Member Yohei72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Brooklyn, New York
    Posts
    109

    Default

    And on the other hand... when I decided to do a little research at Google U. on the topic, I saw that exactly how well or how badly the industry is doing is a much debated question, even among the people who know the most about the topic. This piece does a good job encapsulating the ambiguity:

    "Comics periodical sales have been flat for 20 years – or maybe they’re just stable"

    https://www.comicsbeat.com/comics-pe...e-just-stable/
    Last edited by Yohei72; 02-06-2019 at 05:04 PM.

  11. #11
    Spectacular Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    204

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Yohei72 View Post
    Interesting points, Iron Chimp - that's an angle I hadn't considered and is worth mulling over. But as for this...



    That's just the thing. Most people in the Netflix age aren't paying for that experience and aren't interested in doing so, which is part of the problem with the state of the industry. I'm a Wednesday Warrior, but even I generally prefer reading books in trade when I can, given the long-form, serialized storytelling that most comics use these days - I often can't remember where the story left off by the time I pick up next month's issue. I buy floppies that I'm excited enough about to not want to wait for months to get the tpb.

    I don't know much about these OGN publishers you mention - how many of them are publishing ongoing stories, like TKO is doing? And with major creators from the big time like Ennis and Lemire?
    There were a number of companies who left the floppies market after the 90s crash to almost exclusively publish ogns - fantagraphics, slave labor, drawn and quarterly.

    They were followed into that market by traditional literary publishers who established their own ogn imprints or divisions like first second.

    Ongoing ones is not so easy to think of - volume 4 of love and rockets was all 96pg trades, charles burns did his sci fi trilogy as 3 hardbacks, and jim woodring has done his characters as ogns for a couple of decades. There is probably loads more but ongoing ogns seems far more popular in france with those big 48 pg hardbacks.

    There is def a lot of virtues to ogns - you dont need to have the hook every 20 pages to keep reader buying a floppy - better production qualities over a stapled pamphlet etc,

    However 150 years ago the serialised novel was a popular genre but that died out long before netflix to be replaced almost entirely by complete novels.

  12. #12
    Fantastic Member dishpan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    287

    Default

    This is fascinating to me, as I've tried every format there is and like having options. This lineup of creators is an awesome start.

    I wish they had one more format, an oversized hardcover which includes covers and supplemental features plus autographs or something, and comes with digital copies.

  13. #13
    Incredible Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    635

    Default

    The wait for the cliffhanger works better when stories aren't decrompressed to hell or we get enough decent one and dones to mix it up. As is people are 6 weeks for a one issue opening then 3 weeks of filler then finally a middle/end.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •