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  1. #1
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    Default Do you think oversaturation is catching up to Peter?

    Not Spider-Man, but Peter Parker. I've seen some people mention that storytelling wise, Peter is about to reach a narrative dead end since he has done almost everything and writers are still struggling to maintain the "freshness" unless they revamp him completely or actually go to a new route which is to finally have kids in 616.

    What do you guys think is left for him to do and what kind of stories do you want see?
    Last edited by emmafrosting; 05-10-2019 at 08:53 PM.

  2. #2
    Extraordinary Member Celgress's Avatar
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    Not yet, time will tell.
    "I'm sorry, but your story isn't adding up. I think your religion is a lie to keep my mouth shut."

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by emmafrosting View Post
    Not Spider-Man, but Peter Parker.
    I think Peter Parker is always gonna be popular and in demand. For the same reasons that Donald Duck, Darth Vader, the Disney characters from the 90s renaissance and so on, are all in demand. He's a transcendent figure. His comics have been the most consistently maintained in Marvel, with only two rough patches (90s Clone Saga, OMD-BND).

    What do you guys think is left for him to do and what kind of stories do you want see?
    I don't know in terms of "kind of stories". To me doing the Peter Parker story in the classic 616 continuity from AF#15 to the JMS era and so on is the only kind of story I want. Anything else is just cheap novelties and fads that come and go, which become dated.

  4. #4
    Kinky Lil' Canine Snoop Dogg's Avatar
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    he has not become a male stripper yet, which is why i will be the greatest asm writer of all time
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  5. #5
    Mighty Member Zeitgeist's Avatar
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    I don't think they're at a dead end for the character at all, but there's a great resistance from a segment of fans to see anything wildly different done with him. See: Parker Industries.
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  6. #6

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    Things change enough in modern society that this problem can be avoided as new story opportunities are opened up.

  7. #7
    "Emma is STILL right! Vegeta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snoop Dogg View Post
    he has not become a male stripper yet, which is why i will be the greatest asm writer of all time
    Could have sworn that was used as the climax of the Spider-Man/ Deadpool "double date" issue.
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  8. #8
    Formerly Assassin Spider Huntsman Spider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vegeta View Post
    Could have sworn that was used as the climax of the Spider-Man/ Deadpool "double date" issue.
    Yeah, but it was a onetime thing to appease their dates, not something I think either of them would make a regular thing . . . though it could be fun, I must admit.

    That said, Spider-Man is a tentpole character/franchise for Marvel and thus they will never actually (read: permanently) kill him off or suspend the publication of his comics for any real extended period of time. As for a narrative dead end, only because certain people insist that Spider-Man is first and foremost about "youth" and therefore he can't stray too far from that, i.e. get married, hold down a fairly steady job, have kids . . . or else he'll be "unrelatable" to the audience. Really. It's that kind of B.S. mentality that's putting Spider-Man in a narrative dead end, the fear of him "aging" too much or straying too far from his roots, even though they've had no problem pushing most of the other major Marvel characters beyond their initial boundaries. It's a double standard that needs to be put to rest, quite frankly.
    The spider is always on the hunt.

  9. #9
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    I mean...Spencer's run seems to be going over pretty well, so I can't really look at Peter and see him as being at a creative "dead end," anymore then other characters who've had comics running for decades upon decades and are still getting published.

  10. #10
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    He is also very lucky in having one of the greatest rogue gallery in comics. A hero is only as good as his villains, which makes his “loser” villains perfect since deep down people want them to win sometimes.

  11. #11
    Mighty Member Zeitgeist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    Things change enough in modern society that this problem can be avoided as new story opportunities are opened up.
    That and said changes in society provide an example to filter older stories through a new lens. ie, dating in the 60's versus dating in the 00's. What's old is new again.
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  12. #12
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    Spider-Man sells...so that is why we have 3 ongoing titles starring him. Having said that...I do wish they would dial it back. Characters should be in no more than 2 books per month. A solo book and a team book....with the writers staying in communication so keep some semblance of continuity.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntsman Spider View Post
    Yeah, but it was a onetime thing to appease their dates, not something I think either of them would make a regular thing . . . though it could be fun, I must admit.

    That said, Spider-Man is a tentpole character/franchise for Marvel and thus they will never actually (read: permanently) kill him off or suspend the publication of his comics for any real extended period of time. As for a narrative dead end, only because certain people insist that Spider-Man is first and foremost about "youth" and therefore he can't stray too far from that, i.e. get married, hold down a fairly steady job, have kids . . . or else he'll be "unrelatable" to the audience. Really. It's that kind of B.S. mentality that's putting Spider-Man in a narrative dead end, the fear of him "aging" too much or straying too far from his roots, even though they've had no problem pushing most of the other major Marvel characters beyond their initial boundaries. It's a double standard that needs to be put to rest, quite frankly.
    But there's a narrative dead end in having him age/ going too far from his roots.

    I am curious about what characters have gone radically beyond their initial boundaries. It's worth noting Spider-Man is outselling them.

  14. #14
    Formerly Assassin Spider Huntsman Spider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    But there's a narrative dead end in having him age/ going too far from his roots.

    I am curious about what characters have gone radically beyond their initial boundaries. It's worth noting Spider-Man is outselling them.
    For starters, Daredevil. From swashbuckling devil-may-care crimefighter to tormented defender of Hell's Kitchen, and constantly having his life torn apart in one way or another ever since Frank Miller got his hands on him. And yet, he's been one of the most critically favored and successful heroes in the Marvel Universe for years if not decades. A wild departure from how he was initially conceived, but it was critically acclaimed and proved popular with readers.

    Frankly, though, I believe as long as the core essence of the character is maintained, one can do just about anything. In Spider-Man's case, the lesson that great power must also come with great responsibility should always be paramount, even if it can be interpreted and addressed in many different ways. His great power might confer upon him the responsibility to use it for good, whether in an interpersonal context or even a broader social context, but how does he determine the best way to use it? Would it be better if he used his power to fight crime, or if he concentrated on taking care of the people closest to him, or even on improving the world in ways other than putting on a mask and punching bad guys? Is his responsibility to an abstract "greater good," or is it to the people near and dear to him? Marriage and parenthood complicate that idea even further, potentially forcing him to examine what responsibility can really entail. After all, what is Spider-Man if not an extended metaphor for not only the complications of growing and maturing into a proper adult, but also for the challenges one faces as a (young) adult struggling to make one's own way in the world without parental guidance or supervision?
    The spider is always on the hunt.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huntsman Spider View Post
    For starters, Daredevil. From swashbuckling devil-may-care crimefighter to tormented defender of Hell's Kitchen, and constantly having his life torn apart in one way or another ever since Frank Miller got his hands on him. And yet, he's been one of the most critically favored and successful heroes in the Marvel Universe for years if not decades. A wild departure from how he was initially conceived, but it was critically acclaimed and proved popular with readers.

    Frankly, though, I believe as long as the core essence of the character is maintained, one can do just about anything. In Spider-Man's case, the lesson that great power must also come with great responsibility should always be paramount, even if it can be interpreted and addressed in many different ways. His great power might confer upon him the responsibility to use it for good, whether in an interpersonal context or even a broader social context, but how does he determine the best way to use it? Would it be better if he used his power to fight crime, or if he concentrated on taking care of the people closest to him, or even on improving the world in ways other than putting on a mask and punching bad guys? Is his responsibility to an abstract "greater good," or is it to the people near and dear to him? Marriage and parenthood complicate that idea even further, potentially forcing him to examine what responsibility can really entail. After all, what is Spider-Man if not an extended metaphor for not only the complications of growing and maturing into a proper adult, but also for the challenges one faces as a (young) adult struggling to make one's own way in the world without parental guidance or supervision?
    There is more flexibility with Daredevil since he wasn't one of Marvel's most popular characters before Frank Miller got his hands on him. The book was coming out every other month when Miller became the artist, an indication Marvel didn't quite know what to do with it. Wolfman had a brief run, and thought about making the character cosmic.

    http://www.manwithoutfear.com/darede...rviews/Wolfman

    Miller's take wasn't that out of place with the Lee/ Colan run, although it has led to a push and pull with later writers, with some stories taking Daredevil back to his swashbuckler roots (Kesel, Loeb, Waid) and others going more with the Eisner/ noir elements of Miller (Bendis, Brubaker, Soule)

    Great power and responsibility are major questions for Spidey but a bit vague as an operating principle. Pretty much every superhero grapples with that question. And it's not clear that making Peter a family man is sustainable for decades the way it's been focusing on Peter as a young superhero who hasn't been "locked into" a particular life.

    It's a tough balance figuring out an age where Spider-Man's "young" but could plausibly have had the right amount of experiences to have been part of the Silver Age Marvel Universe. I recall a statistic that the typical person has made 80 percent of their major life decisions by 35 (IE- will they marry? how many kids will they have? what career will they be in?) and it does seem better to have a Peter Parker who hasn't reached that stage of his life.

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