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  1. #16
    Astonishing Member Restingvoice's Avatar
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    Tough. I like The Killing Joke because I like the idea that someone can just snap after a whole day of bad experiences. It feels... normal.
    I don't like Zero Year because it portrays Joker as OP right of the bat (lol)
    I don't remember what's in The Man Who Laughs and I haven't read the other two

    I know what I don't like. An abusive evil aunt who bleaches his face as a kid. I like the art, but the abusive parental figure is so done, even though I appreciate that it's not abusive dad again.

  2. #17
    A Wearied Madness Vakanai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Restingvoice View Post
    I know what I don't like. An abusive evil aunt who bleaches his face as a kid. I like the art, but the abusive parental figure is so done, even though I appreciate that it's not abusive dad again.
    What was this in?

  3. #18
    Mighty Member Godzilla2099's Avatar
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    Not trying to derail the thread but I thought about Joker's Origin earlier when I saw another trailer for his movie. Joaquin Phoenix is the most underrated actor in my books and I thought 'Walk the Line' would be his masterpiece. After watching the trailer, I'm more than convinced the Joker Movie is going to show one of the best acting performances of all time.

    My problem with it is that I always think of nearly every Batman Villain having a shred of Humanity. Their paths were laid out by personal tragedies. They're a victim of some sort of trauma

    I always wanted Joker to be the exception. Just somebody so horrible he choses to be bad. Flat out crazy and wants to see the world just burn. Something about seeing the Joker as a sympathetic victim doesn't sit well with me.

    With the Joker movie, I'm actually taking his side. Joker is the villain Gotham deserves. They made this bed now they're going to sleep in it.

  4. #19
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    Given the Joker first appeared in BATMAN No. 1 (Spring 1940) and "The Man Behind the Red Hood" didn't appear until DETECTIVE COMICS 168 (February 1951)--albeit written by the same man that co-created him, Bill Finger--I wonder what possible origin was in the mind of Finger, Kane and Robinson when they first created him. Was he supposed to just be a killer in clown make-up?

    Or what about my favourite Joker--the one who isn't interested in killing people and mainly just wants attention for his insane jokes. I guess the origin of this Joker is when the killer turns himself in and is executed, but nevertheless returns to life, in "The Joker Walks the Last Mile," DETECTIVE COMICS 64 (June 1942). After that story, he's a much friendlier and less muderous sort of Clown Prince of Crime, right up until "The Joker's Five-Way Revenge," BATMAN 251 (September 1973), when a new nihilistic Joker emerges.

  5. #20
    Astonishing Member Jackalope89's Avatar
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    The son of Mime and Marionette.

  6. #21
    A Wearied Madness Vakanai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Godzilla2099 View Post
    Not trying to derail the thread but I thought about Joker's Origin earlier when I saw another trailer for his movie. Joaquin Phoenix is the most underrated actor in my books and I thought 'Walk the Line' would be his masterpiece. After watching the trailer, I'm more than convinced the Joker Movie is going to show one of the best acting performances of all time.

    My problem with it is that I always think of nearly every Batman Villain having a shred of Humanity. Their paths were laid out by personal tragedies. They're a victim of some sort of trauma

    I always wanted Joker to be the exception. Just somebody so horrible he choses to be bad. Flat out crazy and wants to see the world just burn. Something about seeing the Joker as a sympathetic victim doesn't sit well with me.

    With the Joker movie, I'm actually taking his side. Joker is the villain Gotham deserves. They made this bed now they're going to sleep in it.
    There's another trailer? When/where? I've only seen the one.
    I don't care much if the Joker is a victim or not, it's all Elseworlds anyways, as long as the movie is great I'm good.

  7. #22
    Extraordinary Member Celgress's Avatar
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    I prefer the version from Killing Joke. There is just something appealing about the one bad day concept that any maladjusted slub could become a monster if pushed far enough.
    "I'm sorry, but your story isn't adding up. I think your religion is a lie to keep my mouth shut."

  8. #23
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    I don't really like the one bad day argument. There are people who might be driven to crime or destroying an entire city with dragonfire--but these people already have that potential in them. Not everyone is psychotic. And I think that most people if they have a really bad day are likely to do damage to themselves rather than harm other people. If the Joker did have one bad day, he was already predisposed to hurt others. If we assume that everyone will become evil when pushed, then we will always assume the worst about each other and never have compassion.

  9. #24
    Astonishing Member Restingvoice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vakanai View Post
    What was this in?
    Villain issue in... whatever it was... Forever Evil. Batman number whatever that they scratch out and replace with Joker #1

  10. #25
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
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    Noted sf author Charles Stross discusses two proposed takes on Joker origins originating from twitter, one from Geraldine DeRuiter and one inspired by a job ad.

    Anyway: This is the Joker's origin story. Transplant the hotel from Glasgow to Gotham City: it's not a great frame-shift. I've always visualized Gotham as like Glasgow, only with skyscrapers and American cops and a little less rain and darkness.

    My version of the Joker could be male, could be female, but is definitely millennial.
    And the imagery of Gotham as having a little less rain and darkness than Glasgow…
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  11. #26
    Fantastic Member
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    The Batman 1989 Film also had a new Origin Story and Ledger told more than one in the film or?

  12. #27
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    another joker origin: he discovered a joke so bad it could be never told and trying to tell it made him insane. lol

  13. #28
    I'm at least a C-Lister! exile001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jb681131 View Post
    Question, what to you find so great in this Story ?
    Because I find it very dull and overated.

    Is it because it's by Alan Moore that people sayd it was excellently awsome. Then everyone suggested it to everyone saying it's the best. Then you believed it's the best. Even if it isn't the best you still thing it's the best ?

    The Man Who Laughs for exemple is way better. But because it's not by Alan Moore, I thing very few people have read it and can't compare something of quality against Moore's story.
    *Has a strong plot
    *Tells a concise, layered story, perfectly tying up page one to the final panel
    *Actual insight into the Batman/Joker relationship
    *Gives depth to the Batman/Joker relationship. Before, Joker was the greatest villain because he showed up the most. This and TDKR really fleshed it out into something deeper (though in very different ways).
    *Gives the Joker some MUCH needed depth
    *Gives Joker significant moments to re-emphasize his threat level (both taking out Batgirl and kidnapping/torturing Gordon)
    *Easily the best Brian Bolland art I've ever seen

    If you find it dull, at such a short page count with so much happening, then I don't know what to tell you. I'll leave it there.

    The man who laughs is a tired re-tread of a story that had already been retold many times that adds nothing new, other than gratuitous high kill count and Doug Mahnke's sublime art. And I say this as someone who believes Ed Brubaker is one of comics' finest writers.
    Just. Be. Nice.

  14. #29
    I'm at least a C-Lister! exile001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by theoneandonly View Post
    another joker origin: he discovered a joke so bad it could be never told and trying to tell it made him insane. lol
    Or he was the only person to survive Monty Python's "Funniest Joke in the World", but it drove him utterly insane.
    Just. Be. Nice.

  15. #30
    Incredible Member jb681131's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by exile001 View Post
    *Has a strong plot
    *Tells a concise, layered story, perfectly tying up page one to the final panel
    *Actual insight into the Batman/Joker relationship
    *Gives depth to the Batman/Joker relationship. Before, Joker was the greatest villain because he showed up the most. This and TDKR really fleshed it out into something deeper (though in very different ways).
    *Gives the Joker some MUCH needed depth
    *Gives Joker significant moments to re-emphasize his threat level (both taking out Batgirl and kidnapping/torturing Gordon)
    *Easily the best Brian Bolland art I've ever seen

    If you find it dull, at such a short page count with so much happening, then I don't know what to tell you. I'll leave it there.

    The man who laughs is a tired re-tread of a story that had already been retold many times that adds nothing new, other than gratuitous high kill count and Doug Mahnke's sublime art. And I say this as someone who believes Ed Brubaker is one of comics' finest writers.
    Did you know that even Alan Moore find his Joker story not so great. He only did it because a friend asked him to do a Batman story.
    I'm glad you liked the story. But I don't see the Depth of any realation, I just see a crazy man that once again shows he's got hatred torwards Batman.
    Yes Bolland made an effort because it's Alan Moore, and it's a one-shot.

    Have you read Joker by Brian Azzarllo, here you have a real look into Joker mind. And unpredictable crazy man.

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