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  1. #16
    Incredible Member AngelJD's Avatar
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    One thing I feel we should look at is the differences in business styles and choices that happened during the Early Eisner, Late Eisner, and now Iger periods and see how they went about things. Alot of the major buying seems to be happening as of recent within the Iger period.

    During the early Eisner period first Disney had to battle back from being brought out and divided. Roy Disney had Eisner come in to save his family's company from being separated and sold out to buyers. In the early Eisner period there were big players happening but things started to go from great to a downhill after Frank Wells died, Disney's America fallout, Euro Disney(now Disneyland Paris) all causing financial and company/personal civil war headaches, and then full computer 3d animation (which Disney relied heavily on Pixar at first and only later entered that difficult field with a very rough start but had grown themselves) started to overshadow all 2D animated big screen movies.

    That started the 2nd phase shift within the Eisner period (early period Eisney it felt was hopeful and took risks but later after Frank's death the tone shift and pulling back of resources happened). During the Eisner period they brought or tried to make partnership deals. For the parks Eisner made deals to have attractions that was non-Disney while not buying out (there was a Muppet deal happening with major plans for a Muppet land at the Studios park plus the Mupputs taking over Disneyland for a full year with Mickey and his friends gone on vacation during the early Eisner period but fell when Jim Henson died). Did you know the 'Alien' series and character was going to have a attraction at Tomorrowland? That however fell and instead they made "Alien Encounter the Extra'terror'strial". During the Eisner run he did expand greatly the company by buying ABC network which was a huge deal (plus Eisner I think came from the TV networks side of things before he entered Disney so he had knowledge of the power a TV network has which influenced this choice) but it feels like they were more focus on making partnership or other deals then buying and expanding within added the Studio's park, Animal Kingdom, the Cruise Line, and other expansions within the company.

    When Iger came in he didn't want to be the next 'Walt Disney' like it felt early Eisner wanted (which caused backstage problems) and ran things behind the scenes and made changes. Iger is a person that seems more pure business focused and he let's creative heads handle the creative side mostly as he focuses how to strengthen from a business side. He does want to expand the Disney sandbox with long-term IPs of Disney and during this calculates and buys properties that the risk factors are favourable or help offer content and technology that can help the company. I think however the Fox buy was not just for more diverse IPs but to prepare for the next/present wave of media (cable falling to streaming services) gaining a good portion of Hulu and plus prepare for Disney's own Disney+ service. The one to be buying and just focusing on what Disney has not expanding the parks but changing them within. Iger announced he will retirement in 2021 which is also something different from past CEOs of Disney. To me past Disney CEO's made it personal and took things personally which was a positive and a negative. Bob remained distant much more and doing so that had it's own series of positives and negatives but helped the Disney Company.

    April 2019: “I’m expecting my contract to expire at the end of 2021,” said Iger Thursday. “And I was going to say ‘and this time I mean it,’ but I’ve said it before. I’ve been CEO since October of 2005 and as I’ve said many times, there’s a time for everything and 2021 will be the time for me to finally step down.” “There’s discussion about a succession and they’ve been engaged in a succession process. And we continue to feel that they will be able to identify my successor on a timely enough basis so this company has smooth transition.”

  2. #17
    Incredible Member AngelJD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Immortal Weapon View Post
    Video Games is the one industry Disney keeps failing at. Disney Interactive never got any major hits and they were quick to close down studios who's games didn't platform to expectation. It's shame as I liked the 2008 Turok reboot and Split/Second.
    I was disappointed when Disney Infinity shut down. Mainly they were making a story mode and a Spider-Gwen figure for the game.

  3. #18
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    It should be pointed out that technically Warner Brothers never bought National Periodical Publications (what we now call DC). The Kinney National Company bought NPP in 1967--as well as EC (publishers of MAD) and Panavision. They then bought the failing Warner Bros.-Seven Arts film studios in 1969. A financial scandal in 1972 caused Kinney National to split up its interest into two over-arching corporations. The non-entertainment company was called the National Kinney Corporation and the entertainment company (which included Warner Bros., NPP and Atlantic Records) was called Warner Communications, Inc.
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