Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 63
  1. #46
    Extraordinary Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    8,528

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frontier View Post
    But Baen Book also doesn't publish an entire line of comics with multiple imprints, so I don't think it's a far comparison.

    I don't think the old guard is all that concerned or worried about the Zoom and Ink books.
    But you have others that do.

    I know one that has at least 50 books coming out at any given time. They just all share different brand names.

    Even Nickelodeon had books for their teen shows come out almost every three months and that was at least 7-10 shows.

  2. #47
    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    47,580

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skyvolt2000 View Post
    But you have others that do.

    I know one that has at least 50 books coming out at any given time. They just all share different brand names.

    Even Nickelodeon had books for their teen shows come out almost every three months and that was at least 7-10 shows.
    So what you're advocating is DC has another publisher handle these books like Marvel does with IDW for their kids comics?

  3. #48
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frontier View Post
    But Baen Book also doesn't publish an entire line of comics with multiple imprints, so I don't think it's a far comparison.

    I don't think the old guard is all that concerned or worried about the Zoom and Ink books.
    Once you add in all the trades and collections that DC publishes, the output from Zoom and Ink is rather small.

    Now, you're correct in that the old guard aren't worried about the Zoom and Ink books in and of themselves. Rather, I think it might be office politics. These two imprints (or what is now DC Young Reader, but whatever) is their own little office in DC that has seen great success and seemed poised to expand. Thus the possibility that the old guard of DC set out to make sure it didn't grow too much in size and influence within the company.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  4. #49
    Extraordinary Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    5,852

    Default

    I'm more wondering what their long term publishing strategy is.

    For some books they have planned to do 3 volumes, but most seem intended as one shots and with the current tempo they put them out, they have probably very soon done one for most of the somewhat popular characters.

    So are they turning some of the books into ongoing series of graphic novels or will they launch ongoings series in the future?

  5. #50
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3,740

    Default

    Good question.

    For DC Ink, I think it makes more sense to look at writers rather than trying to look at continuities. Batman: Nightwalker and Batman: Gotham High seems to be going for very different things, and the same is definitely true for Wonder Woman: Warbringer och Wonder Woman: Tempest Tossed. On theother hand, Kami Garcia seems to be intent on linking her Teen Titans books together.

    For DC Zoom, something similar seems to be true. Superman of Smallville and Superman Smashes the Klan are really dissimilar. I think they will try to keep some form of cohesiveness to DC Super Hero Girls, but otherwise the focus will be on one-and-finished stories throughout.

    It won't be that different from the way a lot of popular and young-ages literature has been published historically. The multi-volume continuity is a rather modern invention in fiction.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  6. #51
    Extraordinary Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    5,852

    Default

    But thing is that at the moment they are mostly doing origin stories, and that's not really a sustainable concept on the long run.

    And I'm also not sure if the concept of having multiple incarnation of the lesser know characters in the imprint really works if you want to build a fanbase for these characters. (Iconic Characters like Batman and Superman are little bit different since they don't change that much between different incarnations).

  7. #52
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3,740

    Default

    I think the reason they're mostly doing origin stories is partly because most superheroes have one great story, and that's the origin story. Another factor is of course that YA literature tends to be focused on young protagonists, and that also points towards origin stories.

    I'm also not sure it is dominated by origin stories right now, at least not in the classic sense. Diana Princess of Themyscira is more an introduction story of Diana on Themyscira. Tempest Tossed seems to be similar, though it's not out yet. Under the Moon and Ignite are arguably more introductory stories than origin stories as well. There is plenty of room for more character development and so on.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  8. #53
    Extraordinary Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    5,852

    Default

    But it doesn't really seem like continuations of these stories are planned down the road.

    And I'm also not sure what good an "introductory story" is when in the next story the character might drastically differ (since it is written by an other writer and set in an other continuity).

  9. #54
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3,740

    Default

    Under the Moon and Raven were certainly written with hooks for followups.

    My impression is that the editorial philosophy for Ink and Zoom is extremely different from the rest of DC. Writers get a lot more freedom to shape where their stories are going. Trying to apply the instincts of a continuity reader to the lines will only end in frustration.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  10. #55
    Incredible Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    570

    Default

    Or it could just be that they realised they could have sold even more with longer lead times and concentrating marketing budget on two books so that retailers know exactly what they have and can push them heavy. They could also have realised that parents actually want to buy them all but 3 books a month is making them choose between 1 or 2 of three so they are just cannibalising their own sales.

    But no the most obvious answer is a white middlecaged male conspiracy....

  11. #56
    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    47,580

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aahz View Post
    But it doesn't really seem like continuations of these stories are planned down the road.

    And I'm also not sure what good an "introductory story" is when in the next story the character might drastically differ (since it is written by an other writer and set in an other continuity).
    Quote Originally Posted by kjn View Post
    Under the Moon and Raven were certainly written with hooks for followups.

    My impression is that the editorial philosophy for Ink and Zoom is extremely different from the rest of DC. Writers get a lot more freedom to shape where their stories are going. Trying to apply the instincts of a continuity reader to the lines will only end in frustration.
    Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass also set up a lot of sequel hooks.

    If the books sell well and the authors are interested, I think the chances for sequels isn't 0.

    It seems like the other for the Raven and Beast Boy books plans to do books on all five of the cartoon Titans and then do a Titans book.

  12. #57
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3,740

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by iron chimp View Post
    Or it could just be that they realised they could have sold even more with longer lead times and concentrating marketing budget on two books so that retailers know exactly what they have and can push them heavy. They could also have realised that parents actually want to buy them all but 3 books a month is making them choose between 1 or 2 of three so they are just cannibalising their own sales.

    But no the most obvious answer is a white middlecaged male conspiracy....
    Am I certain it is due to DC interoffice politics? No. But I certainly wouldn't say it's not the case. For marketing in this respect, that is to booksellers and retailers, then it's probably easier to market four to six titles than it is to market two.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  13. #58
    Extraordinary Member WebLurker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    6,890

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aahz View Post
    But it doesn't really seem like continuations of these stories are planned down the road.

    And I'm also not sure what good an "introductory story" is when in the next story the character might drastically differ (since it is written by an other writer and set in an other continuity).
    Having read a couple of them, I can agree; they do feel like set up for something else. If nothing else, I'm left wanting to see more of these versions of the characters and what happens next to them.
    Doctor Strange: "You are the right person to replace Logan."
    X-23: "I know there are people who disapprove... Guys on the Internet mainly."
    (All-New Wolverine #4)

  14. #59
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3,740

    Default

    Bleeding Cool reports on more delayed books:

    Azzarello's and Luppachino's Birds of Prey delayed to March 4, meaning it loses all possible synergy with the movie.

    Batman Vs. Ra’s Al Ghul #5, originally planned for the 29th of January has slipped again, to the 18th of March.

    Doom Patrol: Weight Of The Worlds #7 also originally planned for the 29th of January has slipped again, to the 25th of March.

    And Inferior Five #5, originally scheduled for New Year’s Day, is almos four months late, at 25th of March. While #6 has been delayed from the 5th of February to the 8th of April…
    Together with all the earlier delays on other books, I wonder about how well managed the Black Label office is.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  15. #60
    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    47,580

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kjn View Post
    Bleeding Cool reports on more delayed books:

    Azzarello's and Luppachino's Birds of Prey delayed to March 4, meaning it loses all possible synergy with the movie.



    Together with all the earlier delays on other books, I wonder about how well managed the Black Label office is.
    Black Label's seemed to become pretty hectic after all the controversy of Azzarello's first book.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •