Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 35 of 35
  1. #31
    Astonishing Member batnbreakfast's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3,053

    Default

    It makes me miss Mother Panic

  2. #32
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3,241

    Default

    Some thoughts on #2.

    Sadly, the art doesn't work for me. It's beautifully drawn, but lifeless. I'm not sure if it's the colouring or the linework, but it simply doesn't work for me, except for some very few frames. One example of that is when we see only Ivy's eyes in frame two on page 5, but that is undercut by that the emotional content of the previous frame is totally the opposite, and there is no signal on what caused the shift in Ivy's attitude.

    Ivy continues to be a tabula rasa and struggling with both powers, body, and memory after the events of Heroes in Crisis. But at least the comic is aware of this, and Harley is throughout depicted as someone who will literally go through fire to help her. And the comic continues to call out the stupidity of that comic. Or in Harley's words:

    Dunno if I really trust the good guys to not muck things up again. Not after Sanctuary.
    spoilers:
    In the end, Harley decides to seek the help of the Mad Hatter, who we find out in the last frame has been conspiring with Floronic Man.
    end of spoilers

    Plotwise, it's nothing special, but Harley's care for Ivy really shines through, even when she feels that everyone else have abandoned them.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  3. #33
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3,241

    Default

    No discussion about #2, and nothing yet for #3?

    Fun to see Poison Ivy go She-Hulk. And "a disturbance in the green"? Heh. But I think DC still is scared of showing Harley and Ivy as a real couple, and the comic is poorer for it. It feels like it's holding Houser's writing back. But she is making it very clear that even if Ivy and Harley might not understand each other perfectly, the other is clearly the most important thing in their world.

    It's also a nice touch how Ivy's clothing here is organic and constantly changing with her mood and situation.

    However, I'm not feeling the art. It has a static and plasticy feeling that I think is poorly suited for both of them, especially Ivy, and I'm not sure it really manages to support the emotional beats that Houser sets up. The only piece where I think the art really supported the narrative was when Harley had been stepford-ised by the Mad Hatter.

    So it's an OK issue, but it doesn't really lead anywhere or tell anything new.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  4. #34
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3,241

    Default

    I'm kinda bummed that there haven't been more discussion about this mini. I just read #4, but I think I want to take a step back and discuss all of the issues so far, and why I think this mini is doing a disservice to Harley Quinn and (especially) Poison Ivy.

    Basically, Harley and Ivy head out into the desert in an attempt to escape Floronic Man, and pause at Dinosaur World, where they encounter some D-list villains. After defeating the D-list villain and escaping an ambush from Floronic Man, they ride off into the sunset again.

    First is the art. It continues to feel more static than fluid, and more plastic than organic. I'm not sure if it's the colouring or the linework or the both in combination, but it's neither selling the action nor the emotional interplay to me, especially with Ivy. Not even in the issue's high point, after Ivy had found out how Floronic Man managed to track them.

    There is nothing wrong with Houser's narration and dialogue, but it also feels like Houser has to write an Ivy that is not to her liking—and given what DC did with Ivy in Heroes in Crisis, I can certainly sympathise. So when the artwork largely fails to get the emotional beats needed, the script feels hollow.

    But I think the big problem from a plot perspective is that this has largely been structured as a road trip. Now, a road trip is a classic plot device, but its episodic nature is not really suited to the theme of redemption or self-discovery that especially Ivy needs right now. Houser does her best, but it feels like she has to write with at least one hand tied behind her back, and got the job to fix some of the worst plotlines and character decisions DC has taken.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  5. #35
    Astonishing Member cranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    4,272

    Default

    I dropped it after the second issue as I had similar opinions on it at that point, without pointing fingers, I do not think the art helped the writing or vice versa, but I do lean towards different (not even necessarily better) art would have helped.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •