Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 74
  1. #1
    Incredible Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    748

    Default Is DC in trouble

    Im saying this because it seems like dc is putting fewer books each week and now vertigo is goon

  2. #2
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    2,763

    Default

    No. DC is in no danger of being shut down, it is profitable, and is key to holding a bunch of really valuable IPs.

    Yes. The entire business around floppies is aging and has a very hard time gaining new readers (though DC is experimenting with ways to get around that), which is a strategic challenge. DC also seems to have severe management and leadership issues, though a lot of what we know is rumours and Burbankology. DC also suffers from a creative crisis, where even good ideas are stifled or developed into poor executions.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  3. #3
    Incredible Member jb681131's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    640

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fin5 View Post
    Im saying this because it seems like dc is putting fewer books each week and now vertigo is goon
    Well it's a good ideao !
    DC and Marvel have too many books.
    No one can read them all !
    And the quality of each is not of hight quality.

    Less books, but with a better quality would be perfect.

  4. #4
    Mighty Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    1,831

    Default

    DC had more books during the 90s and better quality control then. So that particular argument is a bust.

  5. #5
    Benefactor / Malefactor H-E-D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    424

    Default

    The entire American comics industry is constantly teetering, because it's a very niche market. One that resists expansion regardless of whether that's healthy for it or not.

    Quote Originally Posted by jb681131 View Post
    Well it's a good ideao !
    DC and Marvel have too many books.
    No one can read them all !
    And the quality of each is not of hight quality.

    Less books, but with a better quality would be perfect.
    I mean, only in comics does the audience have this idea that they should be reading the publisher's entire output. Yes, nobody could reasonably pick up every Marvel book each month. I don't see what's wrong with that.

  6. #6
    Mighty Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    1,831

    Default

    The Marvel Zombie Demo (the read everything crowd) no longer exists. They have either aged out or were alienated from Marvel by the Quesada years.

  7. #7
    Incredible Member kingaliencracker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    936

    Default

    I can't really say how poorly or how well DC itself is doing as a company in terms of revenue and profit. I think sales are declining across the board and print is a dying medium, but I have to believe DC will stick around in some capacity, if just for their IPs.

    Having said that, I think fan dissatisfaction with the current management team is really, REALLY high, and there's a strong belief that TPTB don't really know what they're doing. The New 52 more or less sputtering out just a few years into the reboot is somewhat proof of this, as is the failure to capture the momentum created by Rebirth.
    Last edited by kingaliencracker; 06-24-2019 at 12:36 PM.

  8. #8
    Astonishing Member cranger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    3,825

    Default

    Right now they are trying to grow their presence in the book market. The direct market has for too long been trapped trying to outsell itself to an aging readership and done little to market itself to or structure itself for a younger readership.

    While less books might look like a bad sign (I guess it is, but that sign is of the market as a whole) it should be seen as a genuine attempt to grow it's business by reaching new readers where they are.

  9. #9
    Benefactor / Malefactor H-E-D's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    424

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cranger View Post
    Right now they are trying to grow their presence in the book market. The direct market has for too long been trapped trying to outsell itself to an aging readership and done little to market itself to or structure itself for a younger readership.

    While less books might look like a bad sign (I guess it is, but that sign is of the market as a whole) it should be seen as a genuine attempt to grow it's business by reaching new readers where they are.
    I think the Ink and Zoom books are the best idea the Big Two have had in ages. (Though they're dropping those imprint names)

  10. #10
    Ultimate Member MajorHoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    19,645

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fin5 View Post
    Im saying this because it seems like dc is putting fewer books each week
    Considering how some of those books were doing, dropping them is not a bad idea. And by reducing some titles from a twice-a-month to once-a-month schedule, it may reduce some of the strain on writers and artists.

    Quote Originally Posted by fin5 View Post
    and now vertigo is goon
    Vertigo has been a mere shadow of what it once was for quite a while now.

  11. #11
    Astonishing Member MRP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,343

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Wayne View Post
    DC had more books during the 90s and better quality control then. So that particular argument is a bust.
    There wa sa larger customer base to sell to in the 80s as well, allowing each book to be more profitable and pay for a larger staff to handle more books. The circumstances within the industry have changed, and trying to do thing the way they did in the 90s (or the 80s, 70s, 60s, etc.) now is a surefire way to fail as the marketplace and customer preferences have grown and changed since then and the business practices you use have to adapt and change with the times or your business shrinks or fails. Comparing the way they did business or handled the line in the 90s to now is an apple and oranges comparison. The fact the customer base has shrunk and the product has gone form a mainstream product available at several outlets to a niche product only available at select outlets (and usually only through pre-order as it is non-returnable and most retailers cannot bear the risk of buying in extra copies that might not sell and tied up their liquid cash flow) means they have to handle the line differently now than they did in the 90s, which means fewer books because there is fewer customers and less shelf space available.

    -M
    Comic fans get the comics their buying habits deserve.

  12. #12
    FF purist/snob CaptCleghorn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    5,837

    Default

    Do any of us really have a good idea of how DC Comics is doing? Number of books is one metric, but sales and licensing as well as digital and trade publications have a lot to do with it. But without seeing or even knowing what's used by management to judge the business, the most we can say is "DC doesn't do as much I like as they used to." or statements like that.

  13. #13
    Astonishing Member Restingvoice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    2,881

    Default

    No idea, and if it doesn't push them to care more about other characters than their cash cows, I don't care.

    On the other hand, if DC really only invest in their A-list heroes, which is the impression I got... wait, no... not really... they either invest on their cash cow, their preferred heroes, or their star writers.

    So I'd rather them slim down and really put their all in books they really interested, rather than churning out books starring other characters they don't really have interest in, then it peters out in spirit and quality as they go.

  14. #14
    Extraordinary Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    8,025

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Restingvoice View Post
    No idea, and if it doesn't push them to care more about other characters than their cash cows, I don't care.

    On the other hand, if DC really only invest in their A-list heroes, which is the impression I got... wait, no... not really... they either invest on their cash cow, their preferred heroes, or their star writers.

    So I'd rather them slim down and really put their all in books they really interested, rather than churning out books starring other characters they don't really have interest in, then it peters out in spirit and quality as they go.

    Then DC MUST be willing to accept whatever consequences that results from playing favorites and pets.

  15. #15
    Astonishing Member superduperman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Metropolis USA
    Posts
    3,693

    Default

    This isn't the 1990s anymore. Floppies are up to $4.00-$5.00 a pop. What is the average age of a comic book reader these days? mid-30s to mid-40s? Let's be honest, the kids aren't really into them these days. Maybe some of these new initiatives will change that. But right now, the same people who were reading them 20-30 years ago are still reading them today. I keep saying this because I think it's true. I believe floppies will be phased out within the next decade. I also kind of think that, if things continue on the path that they're on, upper management at either Warners or AT&T will step in and take over. How much creative control DC will have after that will probably diminish. I don't keep saying this because I necessarily want it to happen. But because I really do think this will happen unless things turn around. This may mean firing people like Didio and Lee. Or at least reassigning them. Didio actually has a lot of great ideas for reaching out to new readers. He should be put in charge of that. Lee needs to get back to the drawing board.
    Now listen to me, Clark! This great strength of yours--you've got to hide it from people or they'll be scared of you!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •