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  1. #16
    Astonishing Member David Walton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hypestyle View Post
    a year at the most. The current author isn't guaranteed to be here 4 years from now. See what happened with Hobgoblin. People have forgotten.
    I remembered the Hobgoblin and was pretty hyped for Hobgoblin Lives...but I had no recollection of Rodericky Kingsley whatsoever by the time that rolled around. So the resolution was a little unsatisfying, compared to Ned Leeds (or the other usual suspects). The story itself was great though, as to be expected when Stern is involved.

    If the reveal had gone as originally intended, I'm sure Roderick would have been fresher on my mind!

    I trust Spencer so whenever he wants to reveal it's fine with me. The industry has changed since the 80s and writers don't generally leave a book before their biggest arcs are resolved.
    Last edited by David Walton; 07-17-2019 at 06:59 AM.

  2. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Walton View Post
    I remembered the Hobgoblin and was pretty hyped for Hobgoblin Lives...but I had no recollection of Rodericky Kingsley whatsoever by the time that rolled around. So the resolution was a little unsatisfying, compared to Ned Leeds (or the other usual suspects). The story itself was great though, as to be expected when Stern is involved.

    If the reveal had gone as originally intended, I'm sure Roderick would have been fresher on my mind!

    I trust Spencer so whenever he wants to reveal it's fine with me. The industry has changed since the 80s and writers don't generally leave a book before their biggest arcs are resolved.
    Remember that Stern willingly chose to leave before revealing the Hobgoblin identity. He gave Tom Defalco his blessing to do as he wished with the Hobgoblin mystery. And Defalco wrote with a different character as the Hobgoblin (Richard Fisk), and then he got into a tiff with Christopher Priest (then editor of Spider-Man) who bored with the Hobgoblin mystery and having issues and grudges with Defalco ordered Ned Leeds revealed as the Hobgoblin and then had him killed in Spider-Man Vs. Wolverine for what was basically the most pointless editorial reason to kill off a long-term supporting character ever.

  3. #18
    Astonishing Member David Walton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revolutionary_Jack View Post
    Remember that Stern willingly chose to leave before revealing the Hobgoblin identity. He gave Tom Defalco his blessing to do as he wished with the Hobgoblin mystery. And Defalco wrote with a different character as the Hobgoblin (Richard Fisk), and then he got into a tiff with Christopher Priest (then editor of Spider-Man) who bored with the Hobgoblin mystery and having issues and grudges with Defalco ordered Ned Leeds revealed as the Hobgoblin and then had him killed in Spider-Man Vs. Wolverine for what was basically the most pointless editorial reason to kill off a long-term supporting character ever.
    Which is weird, because Stern only had what, a few issues left before he would have revealed Hobgoblin's true identity?

    I do wonder, though, would Hobgoblin have been as big of a deal if the mystery had only lasted 27 issues, given that he wasn't personally connected to Peter Parker? Impossible to say, but fun to speculate!

  4. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Walton View Post
    I remembered the Hobgoblin and was pretty hyped for Hobgoblin Lives...but I had no recollection of Rodericky Kingsley whatsoever by the time that rolled around. So the resolution was a little unsatisfying, compared to Ned Leeds (or the other usual suspects). The story itself was great though, as to be expected when Stern is involved.

    If the reveal had gone as originally intended, I'm sure Roderick would have been fresher on my mind!

    I trust Spencer so whenever he wants to reveal it's fine with me. The industry has changed since the 80s and writers don't generally leave a book before their biggest arcs are resolved.
    And the reasons for writers to leave books prematurely don't really apply to Spencer.

    Writers leave if they get fired, if they have a conflict about the vision of a title with editorial, or if they get a better offer.

    Sales are good, so it would absurd to fire Spencer, barring some kind of scandal.

    By all accounts, Spencer seems to be a team player and willing to go with different editorial visions (He was on board the title before he learned that he could reconcile Peter & MJ) so that scenario is unlikely. It also wouldn't prevent him from tying up loose ends.

    He seems to be a guy whose dream job was writing Spider-Man, so there probably won't be a better offer.

  5. #20
    Extraordinary Member John Ossie's Avatar
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    I'm personally not in any great hurry. I'm willing to be patient especially given that I'm enjoying the book so far under Spencer.

  6. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Walton View Post
    Which is weird, because Stern only had what, a few issues left before he would have revealed Hobgoblin's true identity?
    Not quite. Stern's intention was to reveal it one more than the Norman reveal (that was 27 issues, so Stern was aiming for 28). Hobgoblin's first appearance was ASM #238, so Stern was aiming to reveal it by ASM #265. Between ASM #252, Stern's last and ASM #265, you have 14 issues, i.e. 14 months. The aim was 28 issues or 28 months, so Stern only made it half way with Hobgoblin before stepping down.

    So no, Stern wasn't an issue or two away from revealing Hobby's identity. That's the reason Defalco prolonged the Hobgoblin mystery because Stern hadn't done enough to set up Roderick Kingsley as the bad guy or establish Kingsley as any fixture for that reveal to land.

    I do wonder, though, would Hobgoblin have been as big of a deal if the mystery had only lasted 27 issues, given that he wasn't personally connected to Peter Parker? Impossible to say, but fun to speculate!
    Richard Fisk wasn't exactly personally connected to Peter either at least in Defalco's vision. If Stern had stuck around, I am sure Kingsley's reveal would have landed. If Defalco had fallen in with Stern's' plan and also agreed with Kingsley, the reveal might have landed.

  7. #22
    Astonishing Member Inversed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    And the reasons for writers to leave books prematurely don't really apply to Spencer.

    Writers leave if they get fired, if they have a conflict about the vision of a title with editorial, or if they get a better offer.

    Sales are good, so it would absurd to fire Spencer, barring some kind of scandal.

    By all accounts, Spencer seems to be a team player and willing to go with different editorial visions (He was on board the title before he learned that he could reconcile Peter & MJ) so that scenario is unlikely. It also wouldn't prevent him from tying up loose ends.

    He seems to be a guy whose dream job was writing Spider-Man, so there probably won't be a better offer.
    I'm honestly betting we're gonna go for a Tom King Batman style approach to his run, ie: 100 issues over 4 years. It would be fairly shorter time wise than the past two ASM writers, but will still be in the same ballpark issue # wise, and so would be enough to tell a complete story of his. (JMS was 75 issues over about 6.5 years, and Slott was 154 issues over about 7.5 years.)
    Current Reading List: Amazing Spider-Man, Spider-Gwen, West Coast Avengers, Ms. Marvel, Peter Parker: The Spectacular Spider-Man, Avengers, Sonic The Hedgehog

  8. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Inversed View Post
    I'm honestly betting we're gonna go for a Tom King Batman style approach to his run, ie: 100 issues over 4 years.
    Ominous comparison because King didn't make it that far. Still Spencer isn't going to bank everything on an engagement story that he could never actually follow through on.

    It would be fairly shorter time wise than the past two ASM writers, but will still be in the same ballpark issue # wise, and so would be enough to tell a complete story of his. (JMS was 75 issues over about 6.5 years, and Slott was 154 issues over about 7.5 years.)
    The trend since David Michelinie is for a writer to have an extended run on Spider-Man.

    Spencer also has an advantage in that he's on the younger side as far as writers go. Or at least I think he is. For some reason, I am not able to find his DOB online. But he certainly seems younger than Slott (Born in 1967), JMS (Born 1954), David Michelinie (Born 1948). I think he's the same generation as Fraction and Zdarsky (both born in 1975).

  9. #24
    Kinky Lil' Canine Snoop Dogg's Avatar
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    If you track Nick's hair via interviews over years, you can see how the Cap books cost him 10 years.

  10. #25
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    I’ve always hated slow reveals simply because if the payoff isn’t worth it, then the entire journey gets tainted. Seeing as how absolute carnage is going to run through the summer I could see the reveal of Kindred happening sometime in December or a bit later. Honestly though the mystery has been great and has people, myself included interested in ASM again. I’m just hoping that Marvel doesn’t screw this up and stretch it out too long.

  11. #26
    I'm at least a C-Lister! exile001's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revolutionary_Jack View Post
    Ominous comparison because King didn't make it that far. Still Spencer isn't going to bank everything on an engagement story that he could never actually follow through on.
    King never intended to go through with the marriage, and moved from Batman to Batman/Catwoman due to other commitments. He'll only be shy a few issues.

    Quote Originally Posted by Revolutionary_Jack View Post
    The trend since David Michelinie is for a writer to have an extended run on Spider-Man.
    I agree for better or worse, I still don't feel Slott overstayed his welcome as some do. Michelinie, though... I mean robot parents? Also, I don't consider BND to be long run by a writer, it was a more think tank of revolving writers (though with Slott as a mainstay).

    Quote Originally Posted by Revolutionary_Jack View Post
    Spencer also has an advantage in that he's on the younger side as far as writers go. Or at least I think he is. For some reason, I am not able to find his DOB online. But he certainly seems younger than Slott (Born in 1967), JMS (Born 1954), David Michelinie (Born 1948). I think he's the same generation as Fraction and Zdarsky (both born in 1975).
    Bring on new, fresh takes! Hopefully, the editors will allow him the same freedoms Slott had (or even more).

    On Kindred himself, ASM #25 kind of suffered for him. His character seems a bit all over the place, and the full page of talking to "Peter" (i.e. ominously talking to the reader) was really bad. I hope they meet soon to know this on the head.
    Just. Be. Nice.

  12. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by exile001 View Post
    King never intended to go through with the marriage, and moved from Batman to Batman/Catwoman due to other commitments. He'll only be shy a few issues.
    If he never intended it, he should never have stretched it out as much as he did. I read his run regularly until The War of Jokes and Riddles and then intermittently because to me his run rested on Bat/Cat actually getting married or that whole thing being a waste of people's time. Since it proved to be the latter, that I think sunk that entire period for me. After that it was hit and miss, but mostly I think King's best work is stuff like Vision, Mr. Miracle, and Grayson.

    I agree for better or worse, I still don't feel Slott overstayed his welcome as some do. Michelinie, though... I mean robot parents?
    The Robotparents was a plot that editor Danny Fingeroth forced on Michelinie, as he has admitted many times. That happened near the end and it was one of the reasons he stepped down.

    Also, I don't consider BND to be long run by a writer, it was a more think tank of revolving writers (though with Slott as a mainstay).
    BND was a bit like the Clone Saga that followed Michelinie's run. Clone Saga was also a whole writer's room approach to Spider-Man and his supporting cast. BND was more successful than the Clone Saga in that their mandate was "Pretend OMD didn't happen" rather than decide on the cloning race horse. Slott wrote more issues of BND than anyone. But then again Slott's own run has 40 issues or so co-written and completed by Christos Gage and others.

    Bring on new, fresh takes! Hopefully, the editors will allow him the same freedoms Slott had (or even more).
    No writer on any licensed comic has freedom.

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