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  1. #1
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    Question supermans suites

    my Q. is if superman's suit was made from the kryptonian fabric his mother wraped him in as a baby and turned in to his suite by Martha Kent if the suite gets wrecked how does he replace it ?

  2. #2
    Father Son Kamehameha < Kuwagaton's Avatar
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    Welcome to the CBR Superman , hope you stick around.

    His origin gets retold constantly and usually you can expect to see the details change. For the origins where his suit is made that way, in theory you can imagine some fabric left over. But in practice, the suit was indestructible so it was never an issue. Probably most of the few times you might see it damaged would be in stories where the damage was conveniently undone by the end.
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  3. #3
    Astonishing Member Vordan's Avatar
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    The Fortress should be able to provide more suits, but Supes’ suits are usually as indestructible as he is, so it’s not usually an issue. In the New 52 the suit was made of nanotech which could repair itself, that’s my personal headcanon for how the torn suits get repaired.

  4. #4
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    In pre-Crisis continuity, the fabric which becomes super under a yellow sun (and can be damaged under a red sun) is elastic--so it can be stretched into long strands (never mind the real life physics that a stretched strand also becomes much thinner). Superman would and did unravel the weave of these strands to create other temporary costumes and materials. So if the suit was damaged (let's say under a red sun), then he would just unravel the material (under a yellow sun) and weave it back together. And as Superman could do this at super-speed, you wouldn't even see him doing it.
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  5. #5
    Mighty Member Adekis's Avatar
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    So in the original version from the '30s and '40s, Superman's outfit wasn't alien, but a material he invented himself. Sometime between then and the '50s, the trend of Superman's blanket coming from Krypton and being sown into a costume got started. Both of these suits were basically never ever damaged in a permanent way as far as I know.

    In the mid '80s, there was a reboot, or a new version of Superman that started, separate from the previous ones. The rebooted Superman had a costume made by Martha, but out of ordinary Earth cloth. This costume was damaged fairly regularly whenever Superman got in a big fight, and presumably, all you have to do to replace the material is stop at Hobby Lobby.

    So I hope that helps.
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    In the Byrne reboot, Superman had an aura that protected his suit, which is how they explained it not getting damaged. But his cape wasn't protected by that aura, which allowed John Byrne to get his jollies drawing the tattered cape. Comic artists have to have their fun.
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    Kal-El's blanket couldn't have been indestructible, or Martha Kent couldn't have cut and sewn it into a costume in the first place. Byrne's "aura" makes the easiest explanation. I wonder whether it extends to his Clark Kent suits as well? Is he still wearing clothes (including underwear) from 20 years ago?

  8. #8
    Fantastic Member magha_regulus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by seismic-2 View Post
    Kal-El's blanket couldn't have been indestructible, or Martha Kent couldn't have cut and sewn it into a costume in the first place. Byrne's "aura" makes the easiest explanation. I wonder whether it extends to his Clark Kent suits as well? Is he still wearing clothes (including underwear) from 20 years ago?
    She didn't cut it she unwove the fabric and then rewove it into the suit

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by magha_regulus View Post
    She didn't cut it she unwove the fabric and then rewove it into the suit
    Also, in the 1960s stories, Kal-El on Krypton was shown to be a toddler and might have been as old as four by the time he got to Earth. He arrived in his baby clothes, which were the same clothes Superbaby was shown wearing on Earth. So Martha didn't have to make him a new outfit right away as he arrived in those duds. And the material is supposed to stretch as he grows. So it might not have been until he was eight years old that they had to make him a new outfit, by which time Martha could have enlisted Clark's assistance in stretching and reweaving the material.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Kelly View Post
    Also, in the 1960s stories, Kal-El on Krypton was shown to be a toddler and might have been as old as four by the time he got to Earth. He arrived in his baby clothes, which were the same clothes Superbaby was shown wearing on Earth. So Martha didn't have to make him a new outfit right away as he arrived in those duds. And the material is supposed to stretch as he grows. So it might not have been until he was eight years old that they had to make him a new outfit, by which time Martha could have enlisted Clark's assistance in stretching and reweaving the material.
    The interesting part of that explanation was always that the suit seemed to be the right size for an adult Superman, even when he wasn't wearing it. He swapped costumes with Batman in some stories to throw people off and somehow Bruce never had trouble getting it to fit.

    If it was the same suit he wore as Superboy, wouldn't it just go back to Superboy size (or smaller) when he took it off and it had nothing stretching it?
    Was it supposed to be stretchable by normal human strength people (and if so why didn't any villain ever stretch the sleeves or something to throw Superman off his game)?

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    error--never mind.
    Last edited by Jim Kelly; 07-26-2019 at 07:29 AM.

  12. #12
    Mighty Member Adekis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Kelly View Post
    In the Byrne reboot, Superman had an aura that protected his suit, which is how they explained it not getting damaged. But his cape wasn't protected by that aura, which allowed John Byrne to get his jollies drawing the tattered cape. Comic artists have to have their fun.
    Right, Superman's "bioelectric aura" extends beyond his body whenever he picks up something really heavy, or grabs something at high speed, to keep its structural integrity intact. This is how he can, for example, pick up a cruise ship in Byrne's The Man of Steel, or catch Lois falling out of a helicopter without Gwen Stacying her, but also how his action suit normally stays intact despite the harsh conditions of being Superman - the aura extends over his suit.

    But the way I always imagined it, when he's in a big fight, his aura draws closer and closer to his body in order to provide him greater protection as he comes under more physical harm, first drawing just to the skintight part of his costume, then drawing so close to his skin that his whole suit becomes vulnerable, which is why his action suit could take bullets normally, but could still tear when he's in a fight with someone like Doomsday. Just my own reading of that particular power.

    Of course, it's an awfully wordy and complicated explanation compared to the pre-Crisis "his costume is invulnerable," but it allows for more artistic expression, and who can complain about that?
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