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  1. #1
    Astonishing Member Vordan's Avatar
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    Default The Ambitious Failure of For Tomorrow

    Ah For Tomorrow, a story that reaches for the stars and almost makes it. It’s a story that has its fair share of fans, including DCEU Superman Henry Cavill. It is not a traditional story in many respects and yet it is a story that may seem very familiar to some. In some regards this story personified both the virtues and the vices of the Post-Crisis Superman incarnation. So if you’re up for a trip back to a time when Supergirl was an angel and Jeph Loeb was the hottest writer in comics let’s strap in for Azzarello and Lee’s wild ride.
    864F502F-1ED3-49BC-937B-21F3A6556E30.jpg

    The story has two main protagonists, Superman (obviously) and his confessor Father Leone. Leone is undergoing a crisis of faith brought about by the real world sexual abuse scandals rocking the Catholic Church being reflected here as well as a cancer diagnosis. Superman is undergoing his own crisis brought about by the disappearance of millions of people while he was off saving Kyle Raynor in space. One of the disappeared is Superman’s wife Lois Lane, and Supes has to cope with almost an entire year of believing his wife and everyone else who disappeared is dead (remember when Lois dying didn’t make Superman cuckoo? I ‘member).

    Leone and Kal act as foils for one another, with each taking turns playing the confessor to one another. Kal vents about the cost being Superman has taken on his personal life, the limits of his ability to enact meaningful change, and his growing cynicism about humanity. Leone tries to guide Kal back to humanity while also harboring some desperate hope that Superman can cure cancer the same way he pulls off all kinds of other miracles. Meanwhile shadowy forces gather in the background seeking the source of the disappearance of people for their own purposes. This brings us to the first major misfire of the story: The main antagonists.

    50427476-CF68-4F2B-AAD5-776C364F1239.jpg
    Here’s the generic Jim Lee antagonists you ordered bro

    The White Spikey not!Doomsday knockoff is Equus and he’s really boring. He’s also the main antagonist for something like 2/3rd’s of the story. As far as I can tell this guy has no depth to him whatsoever than to be someone for Superman to punch. Honestly I can’t help but feel that Metallo would have fitted so much better into the role Equus plays in this story. Equus is basically a merc freak who gets rented out by the not!Illuminati to help some revolutionaries topple a petty dictator in exchange for the device that was responsible for the disappearances.

    Superman takes the device back to his Fortress and faces the heat from the public and JLA. Leone gets approached by Mr. Orr, a character who first showed up in Azz’s Luthor storyline as a mercenary. Now he’s working for the Illuminati and has been dicking around in the background using pawns to get what his bosses want. Cavill likes this guy so much he’s the reason Cavill grew a mustache for his Mission Impossible role. I like him to. He’s your typical Azzarello morally unscrupulous mercenary but he’s written well and he’s a far more interesting character than Equus is. He offers to cure Leone’s cancer if Leone helps him get the device from Supes.

    The final boss of the story is General Zod. I think this is the first time Zod shows up in Post Crisis canon as the main universe’s Kryptonian Zod who was exiled to the Phantom Zone. He’s your typical blustering egomaniac Zod, although he doesn’t scream “KNEEL” every five seconds which is nice. He hates Kal for being Jor’s Son and otherwise there’s not really much to say.

    It turns out the device responsible for the “Vanishing” was built by Kal himself. Lois asked him what he would do if Earth went the way of Krypton, and in a twist I wholeheartedly approve of, Kal doesn’t just dismiss her concerns and tell her to “hope harder” but actually decides to DO something. So he carves out a piece of the PZ with the aid of Kryptonian tech and builds a virtual paradise with robot servants to take care of it, so that if the worst ever comes to pass humanity can avoided dying like Krypton did. I like this development. I like Kal being proactive. I like Superman actually trying to do a little prep time of his own. I like that he’s smart enough to do this and that it actually works until Zod shows up and ruins it.

    The second major misfire is the ending. I really don’t like how Leone’s story ends. He betrays Superman to Orr for the cancer cure, gets turned into a freak like Equus called “Pilate” (notice all the subtle Jesus imagery in this story?) and is last seen punching Equus around in the PZ. That’s how his story ends and Superman doesn’t even really seem to care. In fact Superman is pretty damn cold throughout this entire story which is not surprising given who is writing and drawing it. Supes doesn’t seem to care that his PZ safety measure for Earth gets destroyed. Is he going to build another one? I guess not but we’re not really given another reason why. I like that he builds a base in the Amazon rainforest (and so does Morrison I guess given he calls back to this in his Action run). Superman does say that he realizes he’s been kind of a prick for the past year and he wants to do better and that’s nice. Hopefully Batman and WW don’t have any hard feelings about him being a dick to them.

    So why did this book kinda flop in the long term while Hush has kind of been viewed as a modern classic? Because while the two are very different, Lee was clearly trying to replicate his Batman success with Superman, and both this and his second attempt, Unchained with Snyder fell short. Well for one I think it had to do with the types of stories each one aimed to be. Hush was just Loeb riffing the Long Halloween with an in continuity at his prime Batman. It eases newcomers into Batman’s world by introducing all the major characters both heroes and villains, pays homage to iconic moments in Batman lore like his DKR fight with Superman, and manages to introduce some new components like Hush himself and letting Catwoman know his secret ID which are carried forward by other writers.

    In contrast For Tomorrow seems to want to be a character piece about Superman but it doesn’t actually really have anything to say. It’s crammed full of Jesus references like Man of Steel and like Man of Steel all I’m left feeling is “so what?” Ok he’s Space Jesus, so what? He doesn’t save Leone or Zod, something that would maybe make the Jesus iconography work. He saves Lois and the faceless victims of the Vanishing but Lois was never in any real danger and we don’t really care about the faceless masses. Superman is a dick for a while until he decides to stop. The enemies aren’t traditional Superman Rogues and except for Mr. Orr aren’t very interesting or fleshed out. The shadowy bad guys behind Orr and Equus are to my knowledge NEVER revealed or even named. So why should I care about them? Why did they even want the device anyway? Who knows? They never show up after Azzarello leaves. Lee’s art basically carried this whole story and it’s really is prime Jim Lee. It’s full of beautiful shots of Supes tearing stuff up although I think Unchained manages to surpass it.

    Ultimately I wish some aspects of the story had carried forward, like Superman building a safety net for Earth in the PZ. I wish Azz had done a better job fleshing out the villains or using more traditional Rogues. I think this story does have merits as an examination of an off his game Supes who is clearly bitter about how crappy things have gotten, but it doesn’t really do enough with any of the ideas it puts forward to really be effective.
    Last edited by Vordan; 09-06-2019 at 11:31 AM.

  2. #2
    Ultimate Member Ascended's Avatar
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    I agree with your synopsis.

    For Tomorrow feels like the first two-three issues of a six-eight issue arc, but drawn out to twelve issues without actually moving into the second Act.

    I really appreciate a lot of what Azzarello was doing in that story, and I love that he showed sides of Clark a lot of writers ignore (or have forgotten about). The fact that Clark had a contingency plan on this level.....it's perfect Superman, but Azzarello also showed why Clark doesn't make this sort of thing more of a habit. The priest was a fantastic character, and perfect for what this story, I think, was trying to be. There's individual scenes I adore, and I really like a lot of what For Tomorrow is trying to say. Even when the story fails at saying it, I appreciate the attempt. I think bold failures like this say and do more for Clark's character than the generic, run-of-the-mill successes.

    I think the things that don't really fit, like Equus, might have been an attempt to follow established comic troupes; big bad guy, requisite action sequence in each issue, etc. But For Tomorrow might have actually been better ignoring all that and just being a straight up character study with a tight focus and small cast. Just Clark, dealing with a huge mistake. People would decry it's lack of action and violence (just like Superman Returns) but at least it could've been celebrated as a excellent and in-depth exploration of Clark's character. I'm not saying they should've had no action at all, but I feel like in this case, less would've been more. I think it would've meant more if there werent things put in Clark's path for the sole, shallow purpose of being punched.

    And Lee's art......it's exactly what you want to see out of Jim Lee at his best. I recall some issues/panels/pages being noticeably rougher than others but by and large I think it's some of his strongest work. But I'm not sure if Lee was actually the best choice for this story. Lee does big pin-ups better than damn near anyone, but he's not the best with small, emotional moments. His facial expressions and body language aren't his strong suit as an artist (which is just an observation, not a criticism) and a lot of For Tomorrow relies largely on the inner drama and emotions of the cast.

    It's not a terribly well done story, but I think I learned more about Clark, had more elements of his personality crystallize for me here, than several other, better stories have managed. A beautiful failure, indeed.
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  3. #3
    Father Son Kamehameha < Kuwagaton's Avatar
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    Yeah, it's more or less defined as an Azzarello "cynical, sci fi potboiler" forced to occupy the same space as Jim Lee's"Labors of Superman." Bleak with shifty morality, complex issues both realistic and fantastic, insight into the psyche of Superman through an assortment of new characters as well as extended Bat and WW appearances... a bunch of things that sound good on paper. And there's a connection between the story Lee wants to draw and the story Azzarello wants to write. They both seem like cool guys, but they really didn't figure out how to make the stories one and the same, effectively adjusting for one another. You basically get Superman sitting mopey in a confessional postured like it's Asteroid M.

    Loeb not only had the critical and commercial groove of Batman but also happens to be exactly the kind of writer who understands how to write for Lee. Lee started For Tomorrow with the idea of another hush and they tapped Grant Morrison. Morrison's schedule didn't work for it then and essentially his half of the project became All Star. I like Azzarello but I think at that point Lee should have tried Warren Ellis. Gaiman probably wasn't available either but all you can do is ask. Azzarello incorporates very powerful figures to clash with but you don't get the sense that his heart is in that stuff. You can virtually imagine his story without any real action or DC lore.

    But you hit on what's sort of a positive in that ambition. No offense to Loeb but the story of Hush really didn't seem like a writing challenge. It didn't offer much new... for the OP points tbh I think Hush is a basic expy villain in some respects and Catwoman knowing who Batman is just brings us back to pre crisis. I think Azzarello worked pretty hard on making Superman both savior and villain with enough plot twists to safely return us to his character. It's interesting that this story is the epitome of the era complete with Birthright lip service. And finally, Jim Lee is maybe my all time favorite comic artist. However well I technically understand the art process, there's just always been the biggest spot in my heart for his work. Kaioh Zod (I think he ended up being from another universe) was a sweet design even if it started this weird trend of Zod wearing a Z on his chest. "Oh it's actually two scalene triangles!" Right. There's little that seems to make him Zod. He makes out just a little better in a big story with no other remarkable villains, but he's sort of obligated. I liked comparing this Superman to an earnest Vril Dox and I'm glad he didn't show up to beat the reader over the head.

    I feel like these posts come out as disjointed as For Tomorrow, but they didn't take a year and had no editorial. Man considering how this story was around for the beginning of my dedicated collecting, it was really a wash. All these big new comics with a plot that took forever, and the Azzarello dialogue that's so awkardly clever in beating around the bush. It's a decent answer to the "Space Jesus" thing but I always struggle to come away from any chapter very satisfied with this alternative.
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  4. #4
    Astonishing Member Vordan's Avatar
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    It’s funny because Hush is pretty much a more well known expy of Conduit who came first but never achieved the same recognition. They’re childhood friends/rivals of the hero who piece together the heroes secret ID and put together an organization to take the hero down. Their bitterness towards the hero is motivated by feelings of inferiority nurtured by their abusive parent always comparing them to Bruce/Clark and finding them wanting. They both even “die” at the end of their debut story, although Conduit stayed dead while Hush came back. It’s kind of why I want Conduit to come back, just rework his backstory and powers a bit.

    I was not surprised at all when Cavill namedropped For Tomorrow as one of his favorite Superman stories given it’s clear influences in Man of Steel, I think the priest he even goes see is supposed to be Father Leone. I was amused that he shares my liking for Mr. Orr. And you’re right that Azzarello deserves credit for trying to go deeper here. Loeb’s Hush is pretty straightforward and doesn’t really dig too deep, although I do have to give Loeb credit for having Bruce tell Selina who he was. For that time period that was a BIG step forward for Bruce who was still kind of an ass to everyone. But Azz was kind of the precursor to the Snyderverse in that he was trying to do a high profile story on Superman tackling “real” issues. But ultimately outside of Elseworlds that stuff is pretty much doomed to fail. Eliminating sources of conflict in the DCU would kill the storytelling so Superman HAS to fail. But even his failure doesn’t really have the impact it should. Like I said he doesn’t really seem to care that his safety net for a Krypton scenario got destroyed, or that Father Leone is maybe still out there. This reminds me of Birthright in that it feels like it’s meant to be a launchpad for a run but Azz was never going to stick around on this book.

    It still amazes me that he did such a great job (imo) on Wonder Woman even if that too feels like an Elseworld take (which it pretty much is these days). Maybe he learned some lessons here? Also his foreword to the trade Vol. 1 is hilarious. He doesn’t talk about the themes or why he did this at all, he just tells a weird anecdote about Didio. It’s clear he doesn’t really care about this story just like how Snyder didn’t really care about Unchained. More than anything I think it’s the simple fact that they don’t connect with Supes like they do with Bats that holds their work back when they tried to write him. They’re not the first writers to fail in that regard as O’Neil can attest.

  5. #5
    Father Son Kamehameha < Kuwagaton's Avatar
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    Ah, the collection I have doesn't show that. Just a two page origin recap that I don't remember from the regular issues and uh... some shots of Lee's Superman in front of cheesy digital crosses...

    Wonder Woman was a really good comic if not what WW fans actually wanted. I remember a lot of complaints on that he minimized Diana but it makes you wonder just how much he learned from this very different experience with plumbing the depths of Superman. Only to have that character come back and trouble him when they decided to do SMWW.

    And yeah considering how the Snyder films directly reference other stories it's strange how similar they are to the For Tomorrow tone. Despite calling the first film Man of Steel it's like the writers had a stack consisting of Birthright, For Tomorrow, and Death.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vordan View Post
    Ah For Tomorrow, a story that reaches for the stars and almost makes it. It’s a story that has its fair share of fans, including DCEU Superman Henry Cavill. It is not a traditional story in many respects and yet it is a story that may seem very familiar to some. In some regards this story personified both the virtues and the vices of the Post-Crisis Superman incarnation. So if you’re up for a trip back to a time when Supergirl was an angel and Jeph Loeb was the hottest writer in comics let’s strap in for Azzarello and Lee’s wild ride.
    864F502F-1ED3-49BC-937B-21F3A6556E30.jpg

    The story has two main protagonists, Superman (obviously) and his confessor Father Leone. Leone is undergoing a crisis of faith brought about by the real world sexual abuse scandals rocking the Catholic Church being reflected here as well as a cancer diagnosis. Superman is undergoing his own crisis brought about by the disappearance of millions of people while he was off saving Kyle Raynor in space. One of the disappeared is Superman’s wife Lois Lane, and Supes has to cope with almost an entire year of believing his wife and everyone else who disappeared is dead (remember when Lois dying didn’t make Superman cuckoo? I ‘member).

    Leone and Kal act as foils for one another, with each taking turns playing the confessor to one another. Kal vents about the cost being Superman has taken on his personal life, the limits of his ability to enact meaningful change, and his growing cynicism about humanity. Leone tries to guide Kal back to humanity while also harboring some desperate hope that Superman can cure cancer the same way he pulls off all kinds of other miracles. Meanwhile shadowy forces gather in the background seeking the source of the disappearance of people for their own purposes. This brings us to the first major misfire of the story: The main antagonists.

    50427476-CF68-4F2B-AAD5-776C364F1239.jpg
    Here’s the generic Jim Lee antagonists you ordered bro

    The White Spikey not!Doomsday knockoff is Equus and he’s really boring. He’s also the main antagonist for something like 2/3rd’s of the story. As far as I can tell this guy has no depth to him whatsoever than to be someone for Superman to punch. Honestly I can’t help but feel that Metallo would have fitted so much better into the role Equus plays in this story. Equus is basically a merc freak who gets rented out by the not!Illuminati to help some revolutionaries topple a petty dictator in exchange for the device that was responsible for the disappearances.

    Superman takes the device back to his Fortress and faces the heat from the public and JLA. Leone gets approached by Mr. Orr, a character who first showed up in Azz’s Luthor storyline as a mercenary. Now he’s working for the Illuminati and has been dicking around in the background using pawns to get what his bosses want. Cavill likes this guy so much he’s the reason Cavill grew a mustache for his Mission Impossible role. I like him to. He’s your typical Azzarello morally unscrupulous mercenary but he’s written well and he’s a far more interesting character than Equus is. He offers to cure Leone’s cancer if Leone helps him get the device from Supes.

    The final boss of the story is General Zod. I think this is the first time Zod shows up in Post Crisis canon as the main universe’s Kryptonian Zod who was exiled to the Phantom Zone. He’s your typical blustering egomaniac Zod, although he doesn’t scream “KNEEL” every five seconds which is nice. He hates Kal for being Jor’s Son and otherwise there’s not really much to say.

    It turns out the device responsible for the “Vanishing” was built by Kal himself. Lois asked him what he would do if Earth went the way of Krypton, and in a twist I wholeheartedly approve of, Kal doesn’t just dismiss her concerns and tell her to “hope harder” but actually decides to DO something. So he carves out a piece of the PZ with the aid of Kryptonian tech and builds a virtual paradise with robot servants to take care of it, so that if the worst ever comes to pass humanity can avoided dying like Krypton did. I like this development. I like Kal being proactive. I like Superman actually trying to do a little prep time of his own. I like that he’s smart enough to do this and that it actually works until Zod shows up and ruins it.

    The second major misfire is the ending. I really don’t like how Leone’s story ends. He betrays Superman to Orr for the cancer cure, gets turned into a freak like Equus called “Pilate” (notice all the subtle Jesus imagery in this story?) and is last seen punching Equus around in the PZ. That’s how his story ends and Superman doesn’t even really seem to care. In fact Superman is pretty damn cold throughout this entire story which is not surprising given who is writing and drawing it. Supes doesn’t seem to care that his PZ safety measure for Earth gets destroyed. Is he going to build another one? I guess not but we’re not really given another reason why. I like that he builds a base in the Amazon rainforest (and so does Morrison I guess given he calls back to this in his Action run). Superman does say that he realizes he’s been kind of a prick for the past year and he wants to do better and that’s nice. Hopefully Batman and WW don’t have any hard feelings about him being a dick to them.

    So why did this book kinda flop in the long term while Hush has kind of been viewed as a modern classic? Because while the two are very different, Lee was clearly trying to replicate his Batman success with Superman, and both this and his second attempt, Unchained with Snyder fell short. Well for one I think it had to do with the types of stories each one aimed to be. Hush was just Loeb riffing the Long Halloween with an in continuity at his prime Batman. It eases newcomers into Batman’s world by introducing all the major characters both heroes and villains, pays homage to iconic moments in Batman lore like his DKR fight with Superman, and manages to introduce some new components like Hush himself and letting Catwoman know his secret ID which are carried forward by other writers.

    In contrast For Tomorrow seems to want to be a character piece about Superman but it doesn’t actually really have anything to say. It’s crammed full of Jesus references like Man of Steel and like Man of Steel all I’m left feeling is “so what?” Ok he’s Space Jesus, so what? He doesn’t save Leone or Zod, something that would maybe make the Jesus iconography work. He saves Lois and the faceless victims of the Vanishing but Lois was never in any real danger and we don’t really care about the faceless masses. Superman is a dick for a while until he decides to stop. The enemies aren’t traditional Superman Rogues and except for Mr. Orr aren’t very interesting or fleshed out. The shadowy bad guys behind Orr and Equus are to my knowledge NEVER revealed or even named. So why should I care about them? Why did they even want the device anyway? Who knows? They never show up after Azzarello leaves. Lee’s art basically carried this whole story and it’s really is prime Jim Lee. It’s full of beautiful shots of Supes tearing stuff up although I think Unchained manages to surpass it.

    Ultimately I wish some aspects of the story had carried forward, like Superman building a safety net for Earth in the PZ. I wish Azz had done a better job fleshing out the villains or using more traditional Rogues. I think this story does have merits as an examination of an off his game Supes who is clearly bitter about how crappy things have gotten, but it doesn’t really do enough with any of the ideas it puts forward to really be effective.
    Regarding Equus, Pilate, and the shadowy figures--they were OMAC prototypes and the shadowy benefactor ended up being the Black King, Maxwell Lord.

  7. #7
    Astonishing Member Vordan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stanlos View Post
    Regarding Equus, Pilate, and the shadowy figures--they were OMAC prototypes and the shadowy benefactor ended up being the Black King, Maxwell Lord.
    Now that’s interesting, where was that revealed?

  8. #8
    Astonishing Member Clark_Kent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vordan View Post
    Now that’s interesting, where was that revealed?
    I'm curious about this too. It's been ages since I read that period, but I'm drawing a blank.
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  9. #9
    Mighty Member Yoda's Avatar
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    The OMAC connection is made in the book itself. Orr call's Pilate One Man Army Corps Version Four. Equus is version III. Once Pilate is finished they tell him they are going in a different direction. I think it's just implied it's Maxwell Lord driving it since the OMAC's in Infinite Crisis were the nanotech sleepers

  10. #10
    Astonishing Member Vordan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yoda View Post
    The OMAC connection is made in the book itself. Orr call's Pilate One Man Army Corps Version Four. Equus is version III. Once Pilate is finished they tell him they are going in a different direction. I think it's just implied it's Maxwell Lord driving it since the OMAC's in Infinite Crisis were the nanotech sleepers
    I got the OMAC reference but I did not think the guy in the shadows was Lord. That’s as solid an explanation as any I suppose.

  11. #11
    Fantastic Member llozymandias's Avatar
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    Two things I really despise about this story. First, it destroys the tesseract fortress. Second, Superman is written here as someone who is willing to commit mass murder. Remember the post-coie Kandor that was in the fortress at that time? Superman believed Kandor was destroyed when the fortress was destroyed. Oh btw he destroyed his fortress because Wonder Woman broke into it. Destroy your house because a friend breaks in. How stupid is that?
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  12. #12
    Mighty Member Adekis's Avatar
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    Seems somehow fitting that Henry Cavill's favorite Superman story would be an "ambitious failure," considering the popularity or lack thereof that his own Superman movies have had, unfortunately. That said, I don't recall liking For Tomorrow very much.
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  13. #13
    Astonishing Member Doctor Know's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by llozymandias View Post
    Two things I really despise about this story. First, it destroys the tesseract fortress. Second, Superman is written here as someone who is willing to commit mass murder. Remember the post-coie Kandor that was in the fortress at that time? Superman believed Kandor was destroyed when the fortress was destroyed. Oh btw he destroyed his fortress because Wonder Woman broke into it. Destroy your house because a friend breaks in. How stupid is that?
    I take it as an attempt to wipe the slate clean for the Post-IC/return of the Silver Age/Donner version elements that were introduced after Infinite Crisis.

    Johns brought back the crystal fortress, the Donner versions of Zod, Ursa and Non (no more post-crisis Zod, Faora and Quex-Ul), the REAL Kandor (after the Post-Crisis Kandor was revealed a shame during Buisek and Johns’ run post IC and 52) and the pre-Crisis Legion.

    In a way, For Tomorrow is the last “hurrah” for post-Crisis Supes. Beautiful art in a lopsided story.



    Quote Originally Posted by Adekis View Post
    Seems somehow fitting that Henry Cavill's favorite Superman story would be an "ambitious failure," considering the popularity or lack thereof that his own Superman movies have had, unfortunately. That said, I don't recall liking For Tomorrow very much.
    Cavil likes it because of the Jesus/savior symbolism. The potential to deliver a story where Superman actually changes the world.

  14. #14
    Amazing Member Heavunion's Avatar
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    I have a weird feeling with For Tomorrow. First time I read it, I wasn't a fan of it because it just conflicts with the idea I have of him but the more I read it, with a more elseworld approach to it, and the more I like and find it interesting. I think it's cool to have a story that push Superman on the edge, but one that portrays him as strong as ever rather than bringing him down and I really like how to explore the idea of saving people, if saving people is always the best thing to do.

    I do feel bad for Jim Lee however, he clearly put a lot of work into it but it's not a very blockbuster one. I do wonder why Jim didn't go with someone that would've been something more bombastic like Hush

  15. #15
    Astonishing Member Vordan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heavunion View Post
    I have a weird feeling with For Tomorrow. First time I read it, I wasn't a fan of it because it just conflicts with the idea I have of him but the more I read it, with a more elseworld approach to it, and the more I like and find it interesting. I think it's cool to have a story that push Superman on the edge, but one that portrays him as strong as ever rather than bringing him down and I really like how to explore the idea of saving people, if saving people is always the best thing to do.

    I do feel bad for Jim Lee however, he clearly put a lot of work into it but it's not a very blockbuster one. I do wonder why Jim didn't go with someone that would've been something more bombastic like Hush
    Originally he wanted to do a Superman book with Morrison. He also wanted to do LoSH with Bendis. Not sure where Azz was on his list of writers but he was asking others. I wonder why Loeb wasn’t interested in doing Superman with him? That seems the logical follow up.

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