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  1. #16
    Astonishing Member Revolutionary_Jack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PCN24454 View Post
    We already have that. We might as well have Peter retire and replace him with one of the eight million other Spiders who could fill the role.
    The problem is that you are thinking of yourself. A version of Spider-Man representative of his actual history hasn't been since Weisman's Spectacular cartoon and the Fox cartoon before that.

    For young kids the last ten years have given them an on-screen Spider-Man who is some doofus who lags behind his superfriends or something like that. They haven't been introduced to the classic Spider-Man...I think ITSV was the first time they got a hint of classic Peter.

    So it's worth doing for that alone.

  2. #17
    Fantastic Member Hugo Strange's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revolutionary_Jack View Post
    For young kids the last ten years have given them an on-screen Spider-Man who is some doofus who lags behind his superfriends or something like that. They haven't been introduced to the classic Spider-Man...I think ITSV was the first time they got a hint of classic Peter.
    That explains MCU Spidey's sucess.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revolutionary_Jack View Post
    The problem is that you are thinking of yourself. A version of Spider-Man representative of his actual history hasn't been since Weisman's Spectacular cartoon and the Fox cartoon before that.

    For young kids the last ten years have given them an on-screen Spider-Man who is some doofus who lags behind his superfriends or something like that. They haven't been introduced to the classic Spider-Man...I think ITSV was the first time they got a hint of classic Peter.

    So it's worth doing for that alone.
    There’s no such thing as actual history!! Literally everyone has their own interpretation!! Besides, it’s not in American media’s nature to do one to one adaptations like Japan does with manga and anime.

  4. #19
    Spectacular Member Modamy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PCN24454 View Post
    Thereís no such thing as actual history!! Literally everyone has their own interpretation!! Besides, itís not in American mediaís nature to do one to one adaptations like Japan does with manga and anime.
    I don't think adaptation need to be one to one, so long as they actually capture the core of the character. Peter's been on his own and getting by based off of his own merits from the start. Things weren't easy for him and he was a loner pretty much due to his spite for other heroes that he thought had it easier. MCU Peter and cartoon Peter of the recent years don't really capture this part of the character. ITSV's version felt like the first adaptation in a while to capture the grounded issues that Peter deals with while also still being a hero.

  5. #20
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    When it comes to having a Spider-Man series about Peter Parker, I do think having him as an established adult would be the first thing make things stand out...(Granted he was a college student in things prior to Spectacular, but we can go grad student age). And given the NEED to keep Peter in a set age range, mid to late 20's wouldn't seem as jarring as keeping him perpetually in high school. [I'm 31 now and not too much is different from when I was 25)

    Another thing is to at least PRETEND to be for all ages. (One of the problems I've had with more modern interpretations is that it REALLY goes out of the way to remind me that I'm not in the demographic). I was actually wondering if maybe the cartoons I grew up with were similar, only I'm remembering them through nostalgia thus making it seem more complex and mature than they were. Then I realized that the cartoons right before the Disney buyout (Spectacular, Wolverine and the X-Men, Avengers: EMH, etc) I became a fan of as an adult...

    Focus in Spidey's corner of the MU: while it doesn't need to be as restricted as Spectacular (however, that restriction definitely helped the show play around with minor characters), I don't need to see Spider-Man going against Dr. Doom often. Using team ups sparingly like they did when I was a kid in the 90's definitely made things more special when it happened.



    Quote Originally Posted by Revolutionary_Jack View Post
    You know until Greg Weisman's The Spectacular Spider-Man cartoon in 2008...there wasn't a single Spider-Man cartoon that showed Peter in high school. Every cartoon before whether it's the 1967 one with the theme song, Amazing Friends, Fox Spider-Man, MTV Spider-Man, Spider-Man Unlimited...they were all set in college and had an adult Spider-Man. Into the Spider-Verse has three versions of Peter (Blonde, Peter B., Noir) and all are older dudes and non-teenagers.

    That just goes to show how this idea of Peter as this perpetual high school kid is something that was never a main defining thing in Spider-Man's history and is only something cooked up fairly recently. When Weisman made Spectacular he said that he wanted Peter to grow and age and he expected Peter to go to college in Season 3 and then age everyone alongside. That ended when the show got cancelled. But Weisman's approach was truest to the Lee-Ditko where Peter was a high school kid who was growing and aging and not a perpetual ageless kid.

    Then the series got cancelled and it went over to Disney and under Stephen Wacker and Quesada who produced the Ultimate Spider-Man cartoon and then the current nosh on TV, we have had ten years of Spider-Man as some brainless teenage doll who is dumber than anyone in his demographic.
    Yeah, while Spectacular was the first animated series or maybe even media outside of comics in general that focused on Peter in High School, it didn't feel like he would be there forever. They established that he was a Junior in High School, and while they planned for the entirety of a 5 season series to be in High School, time was CLEARLY passing (seasons, holidays, Flash turning 17, etc). I'm not sure if they would have been able to make their "Mask of the Phantasm" with the more mature DTVs they wanted to do, but at least the thought was there (I mean, it was one of the first adaptations to include Gwen in a meaningful role...[they clearly wanted to adapt the Night Gwen Stacy died])

  6. #21
    Incredible Member Jman27's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PCN24454 View Post
    There’s no such thing as actual history!! Literally everyone has their own interpretation!! Besides, it’s not in American media’s nature to do one to one adaptations like Japan does with manga and anime.
    aint that the truth
    "He's pure power and doesn't even know it. He's the best of us."-Matt Murdock

  7. #22
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    Well, all things considered, I think on the next animated series I would like to see Teresa Parker, Peter's long lost sister.

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mistah K88 View Post
    When it comes to having a Spider-Man series about Peter Parker, I do think having him as an established adult would be the first thing make things stand out...(Granted he was a college student in things prior to Spectacular, but we can go grad student age). And given the NEED to keep Peter in a set age range, mid to late 20's wouldn't seem as jarring as keeping him perpetually in high school. [I'm 31 now and not too much is different from when I was 25)

    Another thing is to at least PRETEND to be for all ages. (One of the problems I've had with more modern interpretations is that it REALLY goes out of the way to remind me that I'm not in the demographic). I was actually wondering if maybe the cartoons I grew up with were similar, only I'm remembering them through nostalgia thus making it seem more complex and mature than they were. Then I realized that the cartoons right before the Disney buyout (Spectacular, Wolverine and the X-Men, Avengers: EMH, etc) I became a fan of as an adult...

    Focus in Spidey's corner of the MU: while it doesn't need to be as restricted as Spectacular (however, that restriction definitely helped the show play around with minor characters), I don't need to see Spider-Man going against Dr. Doom often. Using team ups sparingly like they did when I was a kid in the 90's definitely made things more special when it happened.





    Yeah, while Spectacular was the first animated series or maybe even media outside of comics in general that focused on Peter in High School, it didn't feel like he would be there forever. They established that he was a Junior in High School, and while they planned for the entirety of a 5 season series to be in High School, time was CLEARLY passing (seasons, holidays, Flash turning 17, etc). I'm not sure if they would have been able to make their "Mask of the Phantasm" with the more mature DTVs they wanted to do, but at least the thought was there (I mean, it was one of the first adaptations to include Gwen in a meaningful role...[they clearly wanted to adapt the Night Gwen Stacy died])
    Actually, Weisman already said that he wouldn’t kill of Sally or Gwen. He might’ve changed his mind eventually but I like it better that he didn’t.

    I love that time actually passed in the show. That’s probably the thing that I loved most about it.

  9. #24

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    Something PG-13ish, like the Ultimate Spider-Man comics.

    I'd try to depict a Peter Parker who grows, in a series meant to last for several years where each season of the show covers one year of his life kinda Harry Potter style.

    Given that there have been multiple shows where he's in high school, I could see the wisdom with kicking off with him in college, just as that's a new environment for the cartoons. The problem with that is that it's a wobbly continuity with an already established Spider-Man.

  10. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by PCN24454 View Post
    Actually, Weisman already said that he wouldn’t kill of Sally or Gwen. He might’ve changed his mind eventually but I like it better that he didn’t.

    I love that time actually passed in the show. That’s probably the thing that I loved most about it.
    I would not mind them just bringing back the Weisman cartoon.

  11. #26
    Incredible Member Hybrid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    I would not mind them just bringing back the Weisman cartoon.
    As said in the OP, it's pretty unlikely due to time and rights unfortunately.

  12. #27
    Formerly Assassin Spider Huntsman Spider's Avatar
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    Six seasons and a finale movie, in the vein of Spider-Man: Life Story.

    Season 1 adapts and updates the 1960s comics and has Peter Parker in his final year of high school. He's been Spider-Man for almost two years, he's fought all his major (and some of his minor) foes at least once or twice, and he's scoping out colleges because his intelligence has earned him a free-ride scholarship to any university in New York state he wants. First half of the season is the Sinister Six banding together, led by the mysterious "Master Planner," culminating in an adaptation of "If This Be My Destiny." Second half is Peter settling on Empire State University, where he meets future classmates Harry Osborn and Gwen Stacy, along with Harry's father Norman Osborn and Gwen's father NYPD Captain George Stacy. At the same time, since the defeat of the Master Planner, a new crime boss has been rising in New York's underworld, a crime boss who goes by the moniker "the Green Goblin," and the more Spider-Man gets in the way of the Goblin consolidating the mobs and gangs under his leadership, the more determined the Goblin becomes to destroy him. Ultimately, he deduces Spider-Man's identity from having spied on him and he reveals his own identity, offering Peter the chance to join him for riches and power beyond his wildest dreams, the caveat being that if he turns the Goblin down, then the Goblin will destroy everything and everyone Peter loves and values. Naturally, Peter refuses and they throw down, with Spider-Man winning after an extremely hard-fought battle, but then he has to decide what to do with Norman when Norman loses his memory of being the Green Goblin --- and his choice sets the stage for season 2.

    Season 2 adapts the 1970s stories with Peter in college, specifically building up to Harry Osborn's descent into Goblin madness of his own as he blames Spider-Man for his father being in prison and the subsequent decline of Oscorp, which the board of directors would gladly sell off if Osborn's publicly revealed actions as the Green Goblin hadn't rendered the company such a toxic investment. Eventually, the Green Goblin begins to attack Norman Osborn's enemies, but has Norman somehow found a way to slip out of prison, or is it an increasingly maddened Harry taking revenge on his father's behalf? That's the big mystery, though even with this going on, Peter still has to keep his grades up and try to maintain a semblance of a social life as he finds himself on a blind date with Mary Jane Watson, Aunt May's best friend Anna Watson's niece, while alternately pursued and rebuffed by the ever-mercurial Gwen Stacy. Eventually, it comes down to a (seemingly) final clash between Spider-Man and the Green Goblin, but who's the Osborn behind the mask, and will everyone in Spider-Man's life walk away unscathed?

    Season 3 adapts the 1980s stories, starting with Secret Wars, which introduces Spider-Man to the other heroes of the Marvel Universe and has him returned to Earth at the conclusion of the arc in a shiny new black costume that responds to his thoughts and will . . . but with some very dark secrets and a dark will of its own. The passionate yet ill-fated romance with the Black Cat/Felicia Hardy will also be a major factor in this story, as after the traumas piled on Peter by the end of the last season, he's tempted to abandon his civilian life and go full-time Spider-Man. Eventually, he overcomes that temptation, as well as the temptation of his mysterious (and sentient) black suit, and rededicates himself to his life as Peter Parker as well as his heroics as Spider-Man, culminating in a reunion with Mary Jane that leads to a genuine romance between them and MJ revealing that she figured out Peter's double identity, cementing their relationship. Of course, there's still a new Goblin on the loose --- calling himself the Hobgoblin and ready to take up where the Green Goblin left off --- and Sergei Kravinoff is waiting in the wings for the right time to begin his final hunt, so it's not like Spider-Man's out of the woods yet.

    Season 4 adapts the 1990s stories, the first half being the return of the black suit, revealed to be a symbiote that has bonded with a new host, a host that shares its hatred for Spider-Man, though he and Spider-Man are eventually forced to work together to defeat the symbiote's spawn, who's bonded to a much more dangerous host, building up to Maximum Carnage as Spider-Man, Venom, and a contingent of "street-level" heroes take on Carnage and his band of murderous psychopaths. Following that, Spider-Man has to face off against the Sinister Six once again, brought back together for a new, deadlier scheme of revenge, even if this arc is actually a bridge between Maximum Carnage and the Clone Saga, which will take its cues more from the six-part miniseries retelling and streamlining the 90s Clone Saga and the Ultimate Spider-Man version of the Clone Saga.

    Season 5 adapts the 2000s comics, with Peter about to graduate from college and being headhunted by some of the most prestigious corporations specializing in advanced science and technology. However, all that promise might amount to nothing as he's being stalked by an ancient predator known as Morlun, "mentored" by an old man named Ezekiel who shares his abilities, but not necessarily his moral compass, and later roped into a superhero Civil War and forced to decide between Iron Man (who is also mentoring Peter Parker and has provided him with an improved and upgraded Spider-Man suit) and Captain America (who stands firmly against an act that would force superheroes to register their identities and abilities with the U.S. government under penalty of imprisonment or worse), a choice that might have severe consequences for him and his loved ones in the long run.

    Season 6 adapts the 2010s comics, starting with Peter joining Horizon Labs after graduating from Empire State University, choosing Horizon because after his experiences with Tony Stark last season, he's more than a bit burned out on big tech corporations. However, with Norman Osborn returning once again and taking advantage of the chaos of the superhero Civil War to rebuild and expand his own power base, Peter finds himself forced to step up his game as well if he's going to be able to match Osborn and unite the Civil War-torn superhero community against him. Even after the dust settles from that battle, though, Peter finds himself faced with the question of the legacy he and his alter ego will have left behind, as represented by the form of Miles Morales, a teenage Brooklyn boy who comes to Horizon Labs on a school field trip, only to get bitten by a spider exposed to a miniature particle accelerator on display there. At the same time, he must face off against Doctor Octopus's last chance to leave behind a lasting legacy for himself, and once that conflagration of a final battle is over, he has to decide if this is the end for Spider-Man, and if it is . . . will he go down swinging?

    Then there's the movie --- Peter Parker marries Mary Jane Watson at long last, but will they have their happily ever after? Not if an interdimensional conflict has its say, as Peter faces off against the worst enemy he has ever had, twisted reflections of himself and the darkest possibilities of his future, warring for the fate of the Web of Life and Destiny and their place in its vast tapestry. Even if Peter survives this . . . can he and MJ make it to (and through) their honeymoon?
    The spider is always on the hunt.

  13. #28
    Astonishing Member CrimsonEchidna's Avatar
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    I !mentioned before but I'd love to see a Miles Morales series. For added variety of make it an amalgamation of Miles origin with Mayday.

    Make it so at the start of the series, Pete is forced to retire after a final battle with the Green Goblin. During the fight, Pete lost his leg during the fight and Spider-Man is assumed dead by the public.

    5 Years later the Roxxon Corporation has reverse engineered the Spider formula. Aaron Davis aka the Prolwer ends up stealing it leading to his nephew getting bit by the Spider. With New York "needing" a new Spiderman, Miles steps up to the role.

    Eventually I would also.like to do time travel/future episodes where an older Maydayhas also become a superhero.
    The artist formerly known as OrpheusTelos.

  14. #29
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    I would have a Batman Beyond-esque story where Benjy, Peter’s son and the current Spider-Man, goes missing protecting Miles which causes Peter to come out of retirement to mentor Miles as the new Spider-Man.

    It would mostly be a combination of the Spectacular Spider-Girl and the 2010s Spider-Man stories.

  15. #30
    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrimsonEchidna View Post
    I !mentioned before but I'd love to see a Miles Morales series. For added variety of make it an amalgamation of Miles origin with Mayday.

    Make it so at the start of the series, Pete is forced to retire after a final battle with the Green Goblin. During the fight, Pete lost his leg during the fight and Spider-Man is assumed dead by the public.

    5 Years later the Roxxon Corporation has reverse engineered the Spider formula. Aaron Davis aka the Prolwer ends up stealing it leading to his nephew getting bit by the Spider. With New York "needing" a new Spiderman, Miles steps up to the role.

    Eventually I would also.like to do time travel/future episodes where an older Maydayhas also become a superhero.
    I know you'd say there would eventually be a point where Mayday gets to become her own hero, I would feel kind of miffed to see her origin and dynamic lifted for another character when she's never been properly adapted, unlike Miles who had Into the Spider-Verse.

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