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  1. #31
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    Does a satellite book have to coordinate with ASM? Can't it just do it's own thing?
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by WebSlingWonder View Post
    Does a satellite book have to coordinate with ASM? Can't it just do it's own thing?
    I think it has to coordinate to the extent that stories in both books shouldn't contradict the other and that there shouldn't be an overlap, like villains appearing in both books at the same time. Outside of that, I think being its own thing is fine.

    Satellites were such a Spidey staple for years, I don't know why it's become so hard to maintain them. Maybe the market is just different now.

    Definitely having ASM come out twice a month has made it less vital to have a second or even third Peter Parker Spidey book on the shelves.

    But I still think that with the right creative strategy, there's an audience that would support one.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof. Warren View Post
    I think it has to coordinate to the extent that stories in both books shouldn't contradict the other and that there shouldn't be an overlap, like villains appearing in both books at the same time. Outside of that, I think being its own thing is fine.

    Satellites were such a Spidey staple for years, I don't know why it's become so hard to maintain them. Maybe the market is just different now.

    Definitely having ASM come out twice a month has made it less vital to have a second or even third Peter Parker Spidey book on the shelves.

    But I still think that with the right creative strategy, there's an audience that would support one.
    With Zdarsky on Spectacular, the approach was to provide an alternative to Slott's 7 year two times a month take on Spider-Man, which proved strong enough in the beginning. Zdarsky eventually found a stronger footing as a Spider-Man writer and started knocking it out of the park. But that's a lightning in a bottle situation that Marvel has been trying to capture. So you're right, it would take the right approach, but also the right conditions.
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  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof. Warren View Post
    I think it has to coordinate to the extent that stories in both books shouldn't contradict the other and that there shouldn't be an overlap, like villains appearing in both books at the same time. Outside of that, I think being its own thing is fine.

    Satellites were such a Spidey staple for years, I don't know why it's become so hard to maintain them. Maybe the market is just different now.

    Definitely having ASM come out twice a month has made it less vital to have a second or even third Peter Parker Spidey book on the shelves.

    But I still think that with the right creative strategy, there's an audience that would support one.
    Part of the appeal of Spider-Man comics is that we're supposed to be invested in Peter Parker's story. That doesn't work as well with modern satellite books when you're not sure how one title reflects changes to Peter Parker in another.

    This has consistently been a problem with satellite books, although there were a few workarounds. Sometimes there was coordination, so Amazing Spider-Man would have Peter worried about what's going on with the Black Cat in Spectacular. There have also been efforts to focus on different supporting casts (IE- Spectacular Spider-Man with Peter's college stories, Amazing Spider-Man with the Daily Bugle.) It also helped to have shorter stories which made it easier to determine how everything was connected.

    One thing that helped when comic stories got longer was that Mary Jane was a consistent presence. That way she could talk in Amazing Spider-Man about how badly she was shook up by events in a six part Web of Spider-Man story, creating a bigger sense that these things matter.

    There may be a few hooks for satellite books that make it easier to coordinate Peter's life. A title that focuses on superheroes (Marvel Team Up, a Web of Spider-Man team book) doesn't have to focus that much on what's going on with Peter Parker's private life. A series based on his reporting (Michelinie's Web of Spider-Man took Peter out of New York City for Bugle assignments) also doesn't rely on the standard supporting cast. Editors can help coordinate to make the satellites appear more meaningful.

    Having ASM come out two times a month can make things tougher. In the middle of a four part monthly satellite arc, you'll have six issues of Amazing Spider-Man, which can complicate efforts to coordinate events.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    Part of the appeal of Spider-Man comics is that we're supposed to be invested in Peter Parker's story. That doesn't work as well with modern satellite books when you're not sure how one title reflects changes to Peter Parker in another.

    This has consistently been a problem with satellite books, although there were a few workarounds. Sometimes there was coordination, so Amazing Spider-Man would have Peter worried about what's going on with the Black Cat in Spectacular. There have also been efforts to focus on different supporting casts (IE- Spectacular Spider-Man with Peter's college stories, Amazing Spider-Man with the Daily Bugle.) It also helped to have shorter stories which made it easier to determine how everything was connected.

    One thing that helped when comic stories got longer was that Mary Jane was a consistent presence. That way she could talk in Amazing Spider-Man about how badly she was shook up by events in a six part Web of Spider-Man story, creating a bigger sense that these things matter.

    There may be a few hooks for satellite books that make it easier to coordinate Peter's life. A title that focuses on superheroes (Marvel Team Up, a Web of Spider-Man team book) doesn't have to focus that much on what's going on with Peter Parker's private life. A series based on his reporting (Michelinie's Web of Spider-Man took Peter out of New York City for Bugle assignments) also doesn't rely on the standard supporting cast. Editors can help coordinate to make the satellites appear more meaningful.

    Having ASM come out two times a month can make things tougher. In the middle of a four part monthly satellite arc, you'll have six issues of Amazing Spider-Man, which can complicate efforts to coordinate events.
    I've always said that they need to scale back the release schedule of ASM back to once a month, add a satellite book, and focus on shorter stories for both. That's what worked, but I don't know why it's so difficult now. Every incoming writer wants to tell the next big epic with the character.
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  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by WebSlingWonder View Post
    I've always said that they need to scale back the release schedule of ASM back to once a month, add a satellite book, and focus on shorter stories for both. That's what worked, but I don't know why it's so difficult now. Every incoming writer wants to tell the next big epic with the character.
    Longer stories do tend to sell well, and are sometimes quite good. Lists of the best Spider-Man stories are dominated by arcs that could be their own TPB: Kraven's Last Hunt, Ultimate Spider-Man Learning Curve, Coming Home, Return of the Sinister Six, Dying Wish, Spider Island, Spider-Verse, New Ways to Die, Death of Ultimate Spider-Man, Spider-Men, Back in Black, Blue, Marvel Knights Spider-Man, Negative Exposure, Ultimate Venom, The Death of Jean Dewolff, Shed, etc.

    Scaling back is probably a poor decision, creatively and financially. I don't think every story should be six issues long, but I would aim for something TPB length at least twice a year.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    Scaling back is probably a poor decision, creatively and financially.
    Yes, Marvel isn't about to scale back ASM. Personally, I wouldn't want them too. I like the pace that twice monthly shipping allows for.

    Without that, an arc like Hunted could take up the better part of a year.

  8. #38
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    I think I just want a consistent run again with one writer, one artist, one vision. I get the financial implications of it, and I understand why Marvel wouldn't do it. Maybe not one a month, but definitely have a consistent team.
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