Page 6 of 7 FirstFirst ... 234567 LastLast
Results 76 to 90 of 102
  1. #76

    Default

    58.The Day The Earth Stood Still(1951)
    59.The Conversation(1974)
    60.The Graduate(1967)
    61.The King of Comedy(1982)
    62.The Killing(1956)
    Keep Your Society. Take It With You To The Grave.

  2. #77
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    12,253

    Default

    Haven't updated in some time.



    Movie #17/ 1960s Movie #1/ Criterion Edition #1: Blast of Silence
    The early neo-noir has much to recommend: lovely cinematography, especially when it comes to the early 1960s New York locations, and a focus on the minutiae of being a hitman (scouting the target, obtaining weapons that require specialized modifications.) Director Allen Baron is able to explore the internal crisis of a professional killer who starts feeling lonely on Christmas in a way that doesnít hit the expected beats.
    8/10

    Movie #18/ Seen In Theaters #9/ 2019 Movie #7: 1917
    Seeing it again, maybe itís a little slow at times as a result of the mostly real-time single-take approach. Maybe. But thereís so much that works spectacularly well to highlight missions where itís dangerous even if you donít actually encounter the enemy.
    10/10

    Movie #19/ New Movie #11/ 1950s Movie #1: Daddy Long Legs
    The Fred Astaire/ Leslie Caron (two-time Academy Award nominee; lead in the Best Picture winner Gigi) has some impressive sequences, but canít get past a really skeevy story of a wealthy middle-aged trust-funder falling for an 18 year old orphan who becomes roommates with his niece after he sponsors her. The filmís characters become aware that thatís a little weird, and then the focus is on why the couple works so well despite that.
    6/10

    Movie #20/ New Movie #12/ 2010s Movie #2: The Tribe
    Itís a well-told story of a teen who comes to a new school and falls in with the wrong crowd, getting involved in very criminal behavior. Itís a standard enough coming of age story, except much much darker than usual (Larry Kramer has come up a lot in the reviews). The gimmick is that most of the characters are deaf, communicating exclusively through sign language, almost turning this into a silent film (the noise of the world still matters; there is simply the added tension that the characters are unaware of it all.) The nuance and specifics are lost, but much is gained in an unusual expressiveness where a slap or a punch is part of conversation.
    8/10

    Movie #21/ New Movie #13/ 1970s Movie #4: The Buddy Holly Story
    This musical biopic is pretty standard. Buddy Holly faces opposition in his burgeoning music career, and keeps succeeding by not being awesome and not compromising his values. Itís strange to see Gary Busey actually giving a really good performance, and while the movie is predictable and somewhat cliched (to be fair, some of that might be due to how later films like Bohemian Rhapsody told very similar stories of a lead singer facing conflict with his bandmates) but it is a lot of fun, and gets across the personality of one of the original rock and roll stars.
    8/10

    Movie #22/ New Movie #14/ 1930s Movie #1: Devil Dogs of the Air
    I watched this James Cagney/ Pat OíBrien pre-World War II marine film with my dad, and the main interest is the effects and the historical airplanes, rather than cliched conflicts, where there really isnít much of an enemy (these films get a lot better in World War II, where there are greater stakes.)
    7/10



    Movie #23/ 2000s Movie #1/ Finnish Movie #1: Helsinki Forever
    This take on Helsinki in film looks at the history of the city and the different sections, some of which are known much more to the locals than to the tourists. Itís very relaxing, and something that could be done to great effect with other cities. It could feel like a 70 minute Youtube video, but if so, itís a very well made one.
    8/10

    Movie #24/ New Movie #15/ Seen In Theaters #9/ 2020 Movie #5: The Invisible Man
    The Blumhouse reimagining considers the Invisible Man with a focus on the victim, ably played by Elizabeth Moss, who can obviously convey much more range than the typical horror movie screen queen (granted, there is a lot to terrify any lead here.) It explores more modern ideas of gaslighting, surveillance and abusive, powerful men. The twists are mostly excellent, although there are some questionable moments, even if one of the biggest (evidence that can prove someoneís innocence and left in the bad guyís mansion) has tremendous and satisfying payoff at the end.
    8/10

    Movie #25/ New Movie #16/ 1960s Movie #2/ Criterion Edition #2: Festival
    An impressive documentary capturing the folk scene in the mid-60s, with the expected standouts (lots of Dylan, Joan Baez and Peter, Paul and Mary) and some legends discovered in the nick of time, so their performances are still impressive. Itís fun and thereís a lot to appreciate (teens reverently listening to an old blues man singing about his nine inch candy stick; three Bob Dylan covers in very quick succession.) After Monterey Pop and Woodstock, Iím a bit disappointed to see a documentary where they wonít typically do the full songs, especially with a much-hyped single minute of a spaced out Johnny Cash doing ďWalk the Line.Ē
    9/10

    Movie #26/ 1930s Movie #2: Steamboat ĎRound the Bend
    Watching the John Ford/ Will Rogers comedy again, the good bits (a history museum retrofitted for a southern audience, a steamboat race, the search for a particular revivalist preacher) do hold up, even if much of it is dated, in terms of depictions of conflicts between the educated and the swamp people of Louisiana.
    7/10

    Movie #27/ 1990s Movie #3: The Truman Show
    Itís a clever concept; a man living in a seemingly ordinary life unaware that the rest of the world is watching, and they have some fun with it. Jim Carrey is great at depicting the dawning realization that something very strange is going on, as he starts testing the limits of the world. Ed Harris steals the show as the producer who has developed a paternal relationship with Truman, while controlling everything thatís going on in his life.
    9/10

    Movie #28/ 1990s Movie #4: Dazed and Confused
    Linklaterís comedy gets across the aimlessness of a group of teenagers in Austin, while also featuring some iconic moments, a high amount of which come from bit player Matthew McConaughey in his film debut.
    8/10

    Movie #29/ Silent Movie #1: The Thief of Bagdad
    This is just one of the great fantasy movies, and probably the best silent adventure fantasy film, with one of the all-time great charismatic leads in Douglas Fairbanks, and tremendous effects, sequences and production designs. There is a great sense of joy to it.
    10/10
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  3. #78
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    12,253

    Default



    Movie #30/ New Movie #17/ Estonian Film #1/ 2019 Movie #8: Truth & Justice
    This is the first Estonian film adaptation of the nationís great novel, so itís a relief that all involved handled it pretty well (even making the ten film short-list of best foreign language films, although not the final nominations.) Iím sure Estonian students are happy to have an alternative to reading the 550+ pages of the novel to get a sense of the major cultural touchstones. The story is intimate (set largely in a farm) but iconic, showing the struggles of a man trying to do what is right, while slowly getting corrupted and being blind to his own shortcomings. It gets the obvious stuff (one of the great neighbor rivalries in literature) as well as the subtle (the taciturn typically Estonian farmer unable to truly express himself.)
    9/10

    Movie #31/ New Movie #18/ 1930s Movie #3: Drums Along the Mohawk
    I had seen one John Ford film earlier in the year with Steamboat ĎRound the Bend, but I do aim to get some more use out of the massive Ford at Fox box set Iíve had for years. This is probably one of the least-remembered Ford/ Fonda collaborations. It was just bad luck to have a star-studded drama about newlyweds dealing with pivotal moments in American history come out in the same year as Gone With the Wind. This is an okay drama about the revolutionary war, which gets better with the arrival of Edna May Oliverís tough as nails widow, a curmudgeonly boss and ally. Itís John Fordís third best film from an year with Young Mr Lincoln and Stagecoach, but itís alright.
    7/10

    Movie #32/ New Film #19/ 1930s Movie #4: Doctor Bull
    The first collaboration between John Ford and Will Rogers suffers from some technical limitations that make it difficult to recommend (it was an early sound film so the quality isnít great even before considering the need for a more complex restoration.) This is the kind of story of one man standing up for old-fashioned small-town values that Capra would handle a lot better, although it is a decent showcase for one of the biggest movie stars of his day.
    6/10

    Movie #33/ 2010s Movie #3: Contagion
    This medical procedural has gotten much more relevant lately, as the situation is no longer a weird hypothetical but similar to something weíre dealing with now. Itís exceptional at showing the potential effects of a new pandemic, intersected with smaller stories.
    9/10

    Movie #34/ New Movie #20/ 1970s Movie #5: The Crazies
    George Romeroís non-zombie movie about a plague that makes people go crazy is certainly not subtle, but itís interesting to see a contagion film where the main civilian characters get into fatal encounters with the army. This is a story where there are no bad guys, and everyoneís out for themselves. It shows the potential chaos of a crisis.
    7/10

    Movie #35/ 2000s Movie #2: Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (Extended Edition)
    The Lord of the Rings trilogy continues to hold up. Peter Jackson & company avoid the problems of an overstuffed middle film, by setting up some of the most extraordinary battles in fantasy films, and showcasing Andy Serkisí Gollum, a different type of monster: pathetic and tragic, but still dangerous.
    10/10

    Movie #36/ John Ford Film #4/ Henry Fonda Film #2/ ďGreatest YearĒ Film #2/ 1930s Movie #5/ Criterion Edition #3: Young Mr Lincoln
    This is an interesting period legal drama, illustrating some of the legends about young Abraham Lincoln. Henry Fonda doesnít exactly disappear into the role, but it does fit his stoic but friendly demeanor.
    9/10



    Movie #37/1940s Film #1: My Darling Clementine
    Watching this, Iím almost convinced that no Western could be better. There are so many beats that are standard for westerns, but they work here because itís so mythic, depicting events that will be etched in the nationís memory. The rivalry between Henry Fondaís Wyatt Earp and Victor Matureís dying Doc Holiday does take some different turns, overshadowing the cattle thieves who are the ostensible villains, although they get their moments.
    10/10

    Movie #38/ New Movie #21/ 1980s Movie #1: Flesh & Blood
    The final collaboration between Paul Verhoeven & Rutger Hauer certainly shows the horrors of medieval Europe, in a way Game of Thrones fans might appreciate. Itís pretty nasty, with betrayal, rape, and the plague, although there is substance to it, in the stories of survival at any cost during changing times.
    7/10

    Movie #39/ 1940s Movie #2: The Lady Eve
    Itís Preston Sturges at his wittiest, Henry Fonda as an occasionally goofball straight man, and Barbara Stanwyck as the con artist who falls for him. Very funny and very charming.
    9/10

    Movie #40/ New Film#22/ 1930s Movie #6: Gunga Din
    Cary Grant, Victor McLaglen, and Douglas Fairbanks Jr make for a fun trio in an adventure movie, although it seems kinda slow after all the pastiches of the era (Spielbergís Indiana Jones, Joe Johnstonís Captain America.)
    7/10

    Movie #41/ New Film#23/ 1990s Movie #5: The Snapper
    This is a solid dramedy by Stephen Frears about a large tight-knit Irish family that has to adjust when the oldest daughter is pregnant and wonít say who the father is. Itís elevated by little touches that highlight the family and the culture.
    8/10

    Movie #42/ 1970s Movie #6: Invasion of the Body Snatchers
    With the Coronavirus, I can identify a lot more with the scenes where the main characters are worried about whether strangers will be able to pass on their condition. This is an effective invasion film, showing the arrival of something truly alien, and a slow building of paranoia.
    9/10

    Movie #43/ 1940s Movie #3: Laura
    The noir classic of an investigator who falls in love with the woman whose murder he is trying to solve is elevated by Clifton Webbís toxic broadcaster, and some classic twists that really change the story.
    9/10

    Movie #44/ Silent Movie #2: Phantom of the Opera (Kino Restoration)
    The Kino restoration is fantastic, showcasing the fantastic set design, as well as innovative uses of tinting/ color. Lon Chaneyís Phantom remains one of the great silent villains; sympathetic but also quite mad.
    10/10
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  4. #79
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    12,253

    Default



    Movie #45/ New Movie #24/Silent Movie #3: The Fall of the House of Usher
    This adaptation of several Edgar Allan Poe stories is short, but dreamlike. The sense of atmosphere and the visuals are extraordinary.
    9/10

    Movie #46/ ďGreatest YearĒ Film #4/ 1930s Movie #7: Ninotchka
    It might not be that surprising that a collaboration between Ernst Lubitsch and Billy Wilder results in one of the wittiest scripts ever, a clash of cultures of the freedom and decadence of France versus the coldness and efficiency of the Soviet Union, as exemplified in a romance between Greta Garboís initially cold Soviet envoy and Melvin Douglasís debonair playboy.
    10/10

    Movie #47/ New Film #25/ 1990s Movie #6/ Ebert Favorite #6/ Finnish Film #2/ Criterion Edition #4: The Match Factory Girl
    Aki Kaurismški tells a story of a melodramatic situation, with a character who is barely expressive. Thereís a scene where she writes a letter, and seems to talk more and with greater emotion than in the rest of the film combined. The style is fantastic, and there are some really great touches that establish the reasons for her simple but extraordinary revenge.
    9/10

    Movie #48/ New Film #26/ 1950s Movie #2/ French Film #3/ Criterion Edition #5: The Lovers
    Louis Malleís French New Wave drama provides an unconventional resolution to a love triangle as a house-wife deals with a stiff husband insisting the blowhard boyfriend come for a visit. Then her car breaks down, and a third option emerges.
    9/10

    Movie #49/ New Film #27/ 2010s Movie #4: Byzantium
    This is an odd vampire film by Neil Jordan. The concept of an immortal mother and daughter seemingly close in age has a lot of potential. The scenes largely cover their origins in Britain during the Napoleonic wars and the modern era, with nothing in between, so this is a film I didnít like that much, but could imagine as a TV show. It unravels pretty easily if you pull some threads apart, and the final showdown seems artificial, but thereís some good to it.
    6/10

    Movie #50/ 1960s Movie #3: Once Upon a Time in the West
    Seeing it after binging a few Henry Fonda films does highlight the boldness and effectiveness of the decision to cast him as the villain. There is a greater maturity to this than in the Dollars trilogy, exploring some common western themes (the changing of an era, a gunslinger seeking revenge on behalf of a loved one) with Leoneís signature aesthetic and a tremendous score by Ennio Morricone.
    10/10

    Movie #51/ New Movie #28/ 1980s Movie #2: The Navigator A Medieval Odyssey
    This is an interesting film in terms of perspective, as medieval villagers travel to a strange land: 1980s New Zealand. Thereís some fun with the culture clash, decent stakes due to a kidís prophecy, and some final twists that address some potential problems with the rules of the narrative.
    7/10

    Movie #52/ New Film #29/ Silent Movie #43: 3 Bad Men
    This John Ford silent western is fun, as three likable scoundrels take it upon themselves to protect a young woman. But itís also quite busy, dumping a lot of characters into a historically volatile time. Still, the payoff is fantastic with the final stand of the antiheroes.
    7/10

    Movie #53/ 2000s Film #3/ French Film #3: Amelie
    A quirky and fun film about a strange woman who decides to be an agent of good after changing one personís life for the better, elevated by all the details about the people in her life, the elaborateness of her plans to change everyone else, and her own struggles to accept the risks of seeking happiness for herself.
    10/10

    Movie #54/ 1930s Movie #8: Destry Ride Again
    Jimmy Stewart is pretty good as a man with modern (at least during 1939) sensibilities trying to change a nightmarish section of the American west. The film doesnít quite live up to the courage of its convictions, with a competent but generic conclusion. Marlene Dietrich is great as a flawed woman inspired to do good.
    8/10

    Movie #55/ New Film #30/ French Film #4: Battle of Algiers
    Some parts of the film do benefit from an understanding of a generations old struggle, although the Criterion collection has a lot of extras if youíre unclear about which group was responsible for which attack. The neorealist take on the conflicts between Algerian rebels and the French military highlights the shortcomings of both sides in a relatively nuanced way. This film has been used as an instruction manual by some groups, although thatís more about their problems than the movieís.
    10/10



    Movie #56/ New Movie #31/ 1960s Movie #5: A Safe Place
    This was in a box set of BBS films, showcasing a production company that was really important in the early days of the New Hollywood. Itís one of the lesser known films, although noteworthy for brief appearances by Orson Welles as a magician and Jack Nicholson as the type of jerk he plays so well in the 70s. Itís a convoluted narrative, jumping around in time, dealing with a main character who doesnít have the tightest grip on reality. Despite the flaws, there is a tremendous understanding of character.
    7/10

    Movie #56/ 1950s Movie #3: Shane
    This is a western with more green than Iím used to, taking a standard but certainly well-told story of a gunslinger getting involved in a clash between locals and ruthless criminals to another level with the relationship between the man and a boy he meets. Other great features include Jack Palancheís man in the black hat, the main bad guyís understandable motives, and the question of whether Alan Laddís generally likable Shane can fit in modern society. This is a film that understands that change comes with winners and losers, with the mastermind of the criminals trying to protect his way of life, albeit one that harmed others.
    10/10

    Movie #57/ New Movie #32/ 1990s Movie #4: Contact
    This is almost a sci-fi procedural, taking us through first contact step by step, emphasizing the political drama (including seamless insertions of actual Bill Clinton footage), character focus and moral questions more than the stuff about aliens and terrorists. Itís slow at times, and a bit obvious in some of the arguments about faith VS science, but it goes in some interesting directions, and does have a believable vision of what it would be like to meet visitors from another planet.
    8/10

    Movie #58/ New Movie #33/ 1960s Movie #6: A Report on the Party and the Guests
    Iíll admit I picked this as the shortest film in Criterionís ďPearls of the Czech New WaveĒ box set. Itís a solid but brief fable of parkgoers encountering strange bureaucrats who invite them to a party, and slowly strip away their sense that they have rights worth protecting.
    7/10

    Movie #60/ New Film #34/ 1950s Movie #4: A Man Escaped
    This is an astounding minimalist film that reminds me a lot of The Passion of Joan of Arc, a film Bresson essentially remade but didnít like. Usually, films where the style is supposed to be stripped of artifice are bleak and pessimistic, but this one takes it in a different direction. There is great power in the story of someone overcoming the terrible circumstances depicted so effectively and unambiguously. Yes, a man is a prisoner of the Nazis, with limited understandings of his environment, but that makes it all the more impressive when he determines a potential escape.
    10/10
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  5. #80
    Justice For Hungary Attila Kiss's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    dislocated by Treaty of Trianon (1920)
    Posts
    1,541

    Default Update 7

    61. Get In (2019) - Netflix
    62. Smokin' Aces (2006) - Netflix
    63. Hardware (1990) - VHS Collection
    64. The Adjustment Bureau (2011) - Netflix
    65. How Much Do You Love Me? (2005) - DVD Collection
    66. Cirque Du Freak: The Vampire's Assistant (2009) - Netflix
    67. From Paris With Love (2010) - DVD Collection
    68. Vanishing Act (1986) - VHS Collection
    69. The Debt Collector (2018) - Netflix
    70. Dangerous Lies (2020) - Netflix
    links to my books:
    "TWISTED HOLIDAY HORROR TALES"
    @ comiXology
    @ IndyPlanet
    "Blues Ratz"
    @ Amazon: Spec. BLUE Version Paperback
    @ IndyPlanet: Collected Edition

  6. #81
    Mighty Member C_Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,438

    Default

    60. The Lodge (2019)
    61. House (1977)
    62. Memories of Murder (2003)
    63. Armageddon (1998)*
    64. The Wizard of Oz (1939)*
    65. Sophie's Choice (1982)
    66. The Last Picture Show (1971)
    67. The French Connection (1971)
    68. A Clockwork Orange (1971)
    69. Frankenstein (1931)*
    70. Jaws (1975)*

  7. #82
    Mighty Member C_Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,438

    Default

    Being done with school and being out of work due to COVID, I have been able to watch a lot more movies. I am 1/5th of the way through the AFI Top 100 list, which has been one of my goals this year.

    71. Red Eye (2005)
    72. The Godfather Pt. 2 (1974)
    73. Toy Story (1995)*
    74. Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)*
    75. The Silence of the Lambs (1991)*
    76. E.T. the Extra Terrestrial (1982)*
    77. No Country for Old Men (2007)
    78. Bad Education (2019)
    79. Raging Bull (1980)
    80. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937)*

  8. #83
    Astonishing Member foxley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    2,421

    Default

    I just watched my 75th feature film for the year: Against All Flags, a lesser known Errol Flynn swashbuckler from 1952. Not Flynn's greatest film, but an enjoyable watch nonetheless (and a nice change from some of the exploitation films I've been watching recently), and greatly enhanced by Maureen O'Hara as female pirate captain 'Spitfire' Stephens, and Anthony Quinn as the suitably oily villain Capt. Roc Brasiliano. And there is some serious chemistry between Flynn and O'Hara.

    My films so far:

    1) Revenge (2017)
    2) The Gentlemen (2020)
    3) Knives Out (2019)
    4) Countess Dracula (1971)
    5) Jumanji: The Next Level (2019)
    6) The Mad Magician (1954)
    7) Once Upon a Spy (1980)
    8) Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019)
    9) Logan Lucky (2017)
    10) Frankenstein Island (1981)
    11) The Island (1980)
    12) Frozen II (2019)
    13) Hell Fest (2018)
    14) Escape Plan (2013)
    15) Bottle Rocket (1996)
    16) The Hoodlum (1951)
    17) American Mary (2012)
    18) Razors: The Return of Jack the Ripper (2016)
    19) Faster (2010)
    20) Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (2019)
    21) Snuff-Movie (2005)
    22) How to Rob a Bank (and 10 Tips to Actually Get Away with It) (2007)
    23) Birds of Prey and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn (2020)
    24) The Kunoichi: Ninja Girl (2011)
    25) I Saw What You Did (1965)
    26) Blackenstein (1973)
    27) Peeping Tom (1960)
    28) Hannie Caulder (1971)
    29) The Sniper (1952)
    30) More Dead Than Alive (1969)
    31) The Man Who Could Cheat Death (1959)
    32) Timber Falls (2007)
    33) Miss Fisher and the Crypt of Tears (2020)
    34) The Freakmaker (1974)
    35) Serial Mom (1994)
    36) Primal (2019)
    37) Grim Prairie Tales (1990)
    38) Death Line (1972)
    39) Hobo With a Shotgun (2011)
    40) Drive a Crooked Road (1954)
    41) Creepshow (1982)
    42) Killdozer (1974)
    43) Judas Kiss (1998)
    44) The Screaming Skull (1958)
    45) M.F.A. (2017)
    46) Scream and Scream Again (1970)
    47) Tales from the Hood 2 (2018)
    48) The Man Who Could Work Miracles (1937)
    49) Lady Ninja Kaede (2009)
    50) Slashers (2001)
    51) Money Movers (1978)
    52) Gunless (2010)
    53) The Man from Colorado (1948)
    54) Prairie Fever (2008)
    55) Wishmaster 2: Evil Never Dies (1999)
    56) Seven (1979)
    57) Tiger House (2015)
    58) Death Spa (1989)
    59) Starkweather (2004)
    60) Curse of the Headless Horseman (1972)
    61) Accident Man (2018)
    62) From Beyond the Grave (1974)
    63) The Bold Caballero (1936)
    64) Valdez Is Coming (1971)
    65) Swashbuckler (1976)
    66) Shrooms (2007)
    67) Killer Workout (1987)
    68) The Suckers (1972)
    69) Apache (1954)
    70) Van Helsing (2004)
    71) Scavenger Hunt (1979)
    72) The Notorious Daughter of Fanny Hill (1966)
    73) Bruiser (2000)
    74) John Tucker Must Die (2006)
    75) Against All Flags (1952)

  9. #84

    Default

    63.Justice League Dark: Apokolips War(2020)
    64.The Lighthouse(2019)
    65.The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog(1927)
    66.A Fistful of Dollars(1964)
    67.The Magician(1958)
    68.The Lion King(1994)
    69.The Man Who Knew Much(1956)
    70.Parasite(2019)
    71.The Man Who Laughs(1928)
    Keep Your Society. Take It With You To The Grave.

  10. #85
    Justice For Hungary Attila Kiss's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    dislocated by Treaty of Trianon (1920)
    Posts
    1,541

    Default Update 8

    71. Layer Cake (2004) - Netflix
    72. Taxi (1998) - DVD Collection
    73. Taxi 3 (2003) - DVD Collection
    74. Ski Patrol (1990) - VHS Collection
    75. The Extraordinary Adventures Of AdŤle Blanc-Sec (2010) - DVD Collection
    76. X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009) - DVD Collection
    77. Ski School 2 (1994) - DVD Collection
    78. The Wrong Missy (2020) - Netflix
    79. The Lovebirds (2020) - Netflix
    80. John Henry (2020) - Netflix
    links to my books:
    "TWISTED HOLIDAY HORROR TALES"
    @ comiXology
    @ IndyPlanet
    "Blues Ratz"
    @ Amazon: Spec. BLUE Version Paperback
    @ IndyPlanet: Collected Edition

  11. #86
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    12,253

    Default



    Movie #61/ New Movie #35/ 1990s Movie #5: City Slickers
    Jack Palanche is excellent as the last of the old breed, a contrast with Billy Crystalís city guy. The ďone thingĒ lesson may not be great advice, but itís an iconic moment. It was a fun film about the midlife crisis of a man who hasnít gotten to be the hero in a western.
    8/10

    Movie #62/ New Movie #36/ 1980s Movie #3: Zelig
    Woody Allenís mockumentary of a human chameleon is stylistically different from his usual work, but there are some great gags and absurd twists.
    8/10

    Movie #63/ 1930s Movie #9: Stagecoach
    Thomas Mitchell is decent in his Oscar-winning turn as a drunkard doctor forced to show his mettle. John Wayne is a movie star from his introduction 18 minutes in, so we donít mind the second climax to give his story a resolution after the stagecoach reaches its destination. Itís an easy concept for a great movie, with a group of unlikely companions travelling together through dangerous territory, but executed very well.
    10/10

    Movie #64/ New Movie #37/ 1970s Movie #7: Drive, He Said
    Jack Nicholsonís directorial debut provides an interesting capsule of the 1960s college atmosphere. The main story about a young athlete wondering what to do going forward is okay, although overshadowed by the complete breakdown of his best friend, a guy trying to avoid the draft by taking as many pills as possible.
    7/10



    Movie #65/ New Film #38/ 1960s Movie #7: Daisies
    The highest ranked Czech film on the They Shoot Pictures Donít They Top 1,000 and BBCís sixth best movie directed by a woman is a strange, experimental cartoon with mostly real people. A brief read of any article about it shows that the critique of culture and consumption is well-thought out, but it isnít some impenetrable avant-garde nonsense; itís also weird and fun nonsense.
    9/10

    Movie #66/ New Movie #39/ 1980s Movie #4: Ariel
    Aki Kaurismškiís crime drama ends up being more cheerful than Match Factory Girl, which was ostensible a comedy. He has a weird approach of putting droll blue-collar Finns into films weíve otherwise seen before, which does have satisfying results.
    8/10

    Movie #67/ 2000s Movie #4: Primer
    In this film, we can see both the low budget and the amount of thought writer/ director Shane Carruth put into his work. There are some compromises (a largely offscreen car chase, a pivotal event that occurs off-camera) that make a movie that already has a convoluted time-travel plot tougher to understand, but it is also satisfying in the depiction of ordinary people coming up a discovery with tremendous potential and risk. It works both because of their relationship, and the sense that this is how scientists stumbling on to something major would act.
    9/10

    Movie #68/ New Film #40/ 1960s Movie #8/ TSPDT List #4/ World War 2 Film #1/ French Film #4/ Criterion Edition #13: Army of Shadows
    This movie wasnít released in the United States until 2006 because French critics had trashed it for depicting De Gaulle in a positive light, which is an absurd criticism for a film about the struggles and shortcomings of the French resistance. Itís an excellent, powerful take about the reality of Nazi-occupied France.
    10/10



    Movie #69/ New Movie #41/ 1950s Movie #5: Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
    Marilyn Monroe at her loveliest, Jane Russell as her loyal but different-minded best friend, iconic musical numbers, and a script that isnít quite on the level of the best of Wilder, Lubitsch and Sturges, but close enough.
    9/10

    Movie #70/ New Movie #42/ 1980s Movie #5: Wild Style
    I checked this out because it played a part in Ed Piskorís Hip Hop Family Tree. Itís worth seeing more as a time capsule of the hip hop scene before it became a dominant cultural force, than for the story. There are some shortcomings for production values and performances, which makes it tough to appreciate the filmsí internal logic. Lead Lee QuiŮones is authentic when talking about what the art means for him (since he was a top graffiti artist), and the musical performances are excellent.
    7/10

    Movie #71/ 1940s Movie #4: The Big Sleep
    A depiction of the life the New Yorkers of City Slickers wanted to live for a little while. Itís an atypical western that earns the conflict between John Wayneís tough as nails cattle boss and Montgomery Clift as his adopted son.
    10/10

    Movie #72/ 1980s Movie #6: Batman
    This is a strangely paced superhero film, largely introducing Batman from the perspective of two reporters, so that itís not actually confirmed that Bruce Wayne is Batman until about halfway through. The production design is amazing, Keaton is affable, and Nicholsonís Joker is a lot of fun, but the movie is a bit of a mess with some strange internal logic at times.
    7/10

    Movie #73/ 1940s Movie #5: Red River
    A depiction of the life the New Yorkers of City Slickers wanted to live for a little while. Itís an atypical western that earns the conflict between John Wayneís tough as nails cattle boss and Montgomery Clift as his adopted son.
    10/10
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  12. #87
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    12,253

    Default



    Movie #74/ New Film #43/ 1970s Movie #8: The King of Marvin Gardens
    This isnít the first BBS film saved by its depiction of a particular location at an interesting time (Atlantic City between its boardwalk heyday and the advent of legal gambling.) There are some solid performances from a subdued Nicholson, an unhinged Ellen Burstyn, and Bruce Dernís manic con artist. It doesnít always work, but it is often powerful.
    7/10

    Movie #75/ New Movie #44: Four Sons
    Iíve thought that early Ford did the kind of movies that Capra would do better, but upon further reflection, this is also the kind of material that Ford will do better (How Green is My Valley, The Quiet Man.) This is a flawed but enjoyable film about the immigrant experience in the early 20th Century United States, and the losses in World War One.
    7/10

    Movie #76/ New Film #45/ 1960s Movie #9: Shadows of our Forgotten Ancestors
    Sergei Parajanov had a primitive take on young love in a Ukranian Hutsul village, which fit the setting, with an exploration of what happens after an intense young man loses the love of his life, and tries to go on living.
    9/10

    Movie #77/ 1980s Movie #7: Terms of Endearment
    James Brooksí confident debut as a director has a smart script about an intense but messy mother/ daughter relationship over the course of a pivotal decade, with terrific performances, netting two well-deserved acting Oscars, and two further acting nominations. He takes stories that could be in a melodrama (a housewife feeling underappreciated, affairs, the turn at the end) but adds goofiness and joy.
    9/10

    Movie #78/ New Movie #46/1940s Movie #6: Sands of Iwo Jima
    This was the film that got John Wayne his sole Oscar nomination from his first thirty years of stardom, and I can see why it went over so well. His performance as a tough sergeant is the highlight, and there is some complexity to it beyond the standard cliches. He is strict, and we certainly get a sense of a nice guy underneath, but he is also flawed and self-aware. The rest of the film isnít bad; a World War Two movie with more grit than you would anticipate from the late 1940s.
    8/10

    Movie #79/ 1930s Movie #10: Only Angels Have Wings
    I bought this film a few years back based on a criticís argument that it was the best Hollywood film of 1939. I still wouldnít go that far, but it is an exceptional drama of the people involved in a dangerous profession.
    10/10

    Movie #80/ New Movie #47/ 1950s Movie #6: When Willie Comes Marching Home
    Thereís a tonal inconsistency to this World War 2 comedy about a likable guy who wants to go to war, but canít earn the respect of his neighbors because heís stuck in town, training the real soldiers. The central conflict is a bit hard to accept, and doesnít really gel when heís finally offered a dangerous mission in Europe. Thereís a lot of charm, but the stakes are often just too low.
    7/10

    Movie #81/ New Movie #48/ 1940s Movie #7: Tobacco Road
    Fox thought this comedy about a poor family would be a bigger hit than The Grapes of Wrath. While it compromised on the source material, it is rare how this movie depicts the truly poor, often at their most pathetic and selfish. Even if it toned down the play it is based on, it is daring in the depiction of the grotesques.
    7/10



    Movie #82/ New Film #49/ 1960s Movie #10: It Happened Here
    I had been familiar with Kevin Brownlow as a film preservationist (he was largely responsible for restoring Abel Ganceís Napoleon to its five-hour length) so it was a little weird to discover that he had been responsible for an alternate history independent film Mark Kermode had recommended. It does convey the sense of an ordinary person trying to live a normal life in an England occupied by the Nazis, a powerful concept handled matter of factly.
    8/10

    Movie #83/ 1970s Movie #9: The Last Picture Show
    This is connected to a lot of films Iíve seen this month. Itís a BBS film, and Iím seeing plenty of those as part of the box set. Thereís a plot point about characters in the film watching Red River. There are some similarities between Curly and Sam the Lion (actors from Westerns in previous generations playing a mentor figure who seems to be from a different dying era, with a key scene where they recall a lost love and end up winning Oscars.) Itís one of the highlights of the new Hollywood of the 1970s, depicting the end of an earlier era, with one hell of a cast showing the stories of teenagers becoming adults.
    10/10

    Movie #84/ New Movie #50/ 2019 Film #9: Ashes in the Snow
    Itís a bit distracting that this film is in English. I get that a lot of films about events in Europe in modern memory are in English (Schindlerís List as the ultimate example) but those have the advantage of an all-star cast which isnít the case here. Itís not all that different from Holocaust dramas, although it depicts a different form of mass murder, with mass deportations of the Baltic nations, an event that is significant to me as it is something that happened to some of my ancestors. There was an anecdote about Crazy Rich Asians that might apply here. A white filmgoer said that it was derivative of romantic comedies, and Asian-American viewers yelled back that they wanted to see themselves in these stories. And there is something about seeing the stories of our ancestors, even if the actual execution of it is just okay.
    7/10

    Movie #85/ 1960s Movie #11: Easy Rider
    When this film came out, it was daring by speaking to the concerns and interests of a younger generation. Itís impossible to convey that to a modern audience, although what it loses by all the imitations it gains by its effectiveness as a time capsule, covering two young dopes, travelling the United States, sometimes finding friendly faces and sometimes facing opposition. The situations may occasionally be extreme, but itís not always what you expect.
    10/10

    Movie #86/ New Movie #51/ Silent Movie #6: Spies
    Fritz Langís silent espionage saga is sometimes slow and convoluted, but often quite clever with some astounding silent action sequences, and some decent twists in a clash between a spy network and the authorites.
    8/10

    Movie #87/ 1970s Movie #10: Five Easy Pieces
    As with Easy Rider, itís difficult to appreciate the impact of Nicholsonís Robert Dupea on younger audiences in the early 70s who saw themselves represented on film. This is still quite satisfying as the depiction of a truly alienated man. Iím not sure Nicholsonís ever been more sensitive (while still deeply flawed), although the film is more than just a showcase for him, given the variety of kooks he interacts with.
    9/10



    Movie #88/ New Movie #52/ 1950s Movie #7: Horse Soldiers
    The sole Ford/ Wayne collaboration in a ten film John Wayne DVD set isnít one of their better efforts. Wayneís tough Civil War colonel seems derivative of a few of his other performances, without the nuance of Sands of Iwo Jima or the fire of Red River. Itís Ford, so there are some great sequences, but itís also Golden Age of Hollywood, so the South is given more credit than they deserve.
    7/10

    Movie #89/ 1940s Film #8: The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
    This Huston/ Bogart collaboration feels more like a noir than a Golden Age of Hollywood adventure. Honestly, Bogart is darker and more despicable here than he is in any noir, in a story of down on their luck prospectors who very quickly get comfortable with the idea of killing strangers in order to maintain their wealth.
    10/10

    Movie #90/ New Movie #52/ 1970s Movie #11: The Shootist
    Wayne took this role after many others had turned it down, which seems a bit surprising, since no one else could have played this particular version of the story so well. He sells the performance of a dying legendary gunslinger in a movie that conveys the changes in the old west quite well; the West has gotten more crowded, and been changed with the arrival of modern amenities. Itís Don Siegel, so itís not subtle, although there are great supporting performances by Jimmy Stewart (who sells the idea of a deep shared history), Lauren Bacall and Ron Howard, as a slightly older version of the kid in Shane. The villains arenít great, but theyíre okay. I donít necessarily buy the reaction of the town.
    8/10

    Movie #91/ 1940s Movie #9: His Girl Friday
    This might have the fastest dialogue of any movie ever. Itís a great showcase for Hawks and one of the definitive Cary Grant performances as a charming but manipulative newspaper man trying to get his ex-wife/ best reporter back.
    9/10
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  13. #88
    Mighty Member C_Miller's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,438

    Default

    Finally cleared 100. I am now a third of the way through the AFI Top 100 list, which puts me in pretty good shape, though that should be done before the end of the summer (though we'll see if I can bring myself to watch It's a Wonderful Life in 90 degree weather). This stretch was pretty heavy on rewatches, so I've fallen behind on where I want to be on new to me films for my 150 new films in 2020 goal. My goal for 50 Foreign films in 2020 have taken a backseat to the AFI Top 100. I've also found myself distracted with the quarantine, so subtitled movies haven't been great. Hoping that changes now that I'm back at work. As always, starred films are rewatches.

    81. Air Force One (1997)*
    82. A Trip to the Moon (1902) - This is kind of a cheat as it's 15 minutes long, but its's one of the oldest examples of a narrative film. I'll watch at least 201.
    83. Toy Story 2 (1999)*
    84. Toy Story 3 (2010)*
    85. Network (1976)
    86. Some Like it Hot (1959)*
    87. On the Waterfront (1954)*
    88. Schindler's List (1994)
    89. Rear Window (1954)*
    90. Chinatown (1974)
    91. The General (1926)
    92. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)*
    93. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969)
    94. Bonnie & Clyde (1967)
    95. Titanic (1997)*
    96. King Kong (1933)
    97. All About Eve (1950)
    98. The Lovebirds (2020)
    99. The Half of It (2020)
    100. The Invisible Man (2020)

  14. #89
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    12,253

    Default

    I saw an interesting movie challenge online that could give ideas on anyone stuck on what to watch next.


    Seqart has also put two 80 minute documentaries on Warren Ellis & Grant Morrison on youtube.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OtnkhgDn8A8
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ZcflWe6Fhc

    Criterion has decided to show their support for the black lives matter movement by lifting some key films by African-American directors from the paywall, so that's another potential resource.
    https://www.indiewire.com/2020/06/cr...ng-1202235384/
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  15. #90
    Justice For Hungary Attila Kiss's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    dislocated by Treaty of Trianon (1920)
    Posts
    1,541

    Default Update 9

    81. Tank Girl (1995) - DVD Collection
    82. Top Secret! (1984) - DVD Collection
    83. Fire And Ice (1983) - DVD Collection
    84. Starship Troopers (1997) - DVD Collection
    85. The Corporal And The Others (1965) - DVD Collection
    86. Opium: Diary Of A Madwoman (2007) - DVD Collection
    87. The Witness (1969 banned until 1979) - DVD Collection
    88. Mortal Kombat (1995) - DVD Collection
    89. Bottom Of The World (2017) - Netflix
    90. The Shadow (1994) - DVD Collection
    links to my books:
    "TWISTED HOLIDAY HORROR TALES"
    @ comiXology
    @ IndyPlanet
    "Blues Ratz"
    @ Amazon: Spec. BLUE Version Paperback
    @ IndyPlanet: Collected Edition

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •