Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 95
  1. #16
    White Walker Icefanatic's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    138

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Buttocks View Post

    Iceman Ė seems to be written as the joker of the group, but his dialogue isnít particularly great. One nice line towards Kurt, and thatís about it. If Fantomex is Grant Morrison, Iceman may well be Joe Casey, given his refusal to take his sunglasses off, even in the sewers at night using a flashlight. Thatís devotion to the look.
    Ian Churchill has said he based Iceman's look of off Joe Casey.

    Man, I was so excited that Ian Churchill was going to be drawing Iceman at the time... right up until he 'iced up'. The cool coat and shades then looked like a lab coat and 'geek glasses'. Epic fail.

  2. #17
    Fantastic Member Captain Buttocks's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thievery View Post
    As for 395, here's how I feel.

    Chamber get's off to a great start, as stated. Except for, in my opinion, Chamber's naivety.

    Much of the rest of the comic is unoriginal. You have the Mutant Massacre repeat, which isn't the type of story that you want to tell if you are trying to launch a bold new era.
    The B-Plot with Chamber is also unoriginal. I didn't know this at the time that I read Poptopia, but Sugar Kane and Chamber is a little bit of a replay of Lila Cheney and I believe Cannonball.

    Kane/Chamber at least has the idea of Sugar Kane only using Chamber as publicity going for it. The problem there though, is that I just don't picture Chamber as being naÔve enough to go along with this. I know that later on you get the feeling that Jono knows that he was being used, and was getting something from Sugar Kane himself. I also get that Chamber probably saw this as a way to avoid joining the X-Men, and doing things his own way. But, the idea that Jono would come across as oblivious to how the media would end up writing tabloid stories featuring Sugar and himself in a negative light comes across as a little half baked. Jono knows that mutants always are portrayed in a negative light by the press. Just my opinion.
    Yes - I always wonder if Sugar wanted publicity *that* bad if an actual celebrity mutant, and not just a Joe-regular might have been a better plot. Rather unfortunately for Casey, X-Force was at the time doing celebrity satire a great deal better.

    I also dont feel like its a bad comic (especially in hindsight) and it was a very competent - unfortunately we were promised more!

    As far as how Austen wrote woman, in my opinion he did a realy bad job with Stacey, Husk, and She-Hulk. But, the work that he did with Polaris leads to some great stories for the character, and helps lead her to a portrayal that I think that a lot of readers like. And, Nurse Annie gives off some Mary Sue vibes. She wasn't written to terribly, she just wasn't a very god character, in my opinion.
    A lot of Polaris fans also think Austen was great. I am a Polaris fan but I dont feel that every single other character in the comic needs to be written as utterly unobservant and dense just to give Lorna something interesting to do. I considered an issue-by-issue analysis of Chuck but it's been well covered by better writers than me elsewhere on the internet (I think Chris Sims did something similar)

    I never realized that Fantomex was meant to be a stand in for Morrison during his run. I feel bad for Morrison, given how hated that Fantomex seems to be.
    Morrison never stated so, it was more of a fan theory based on his portrayal of himself in The iNvisibles/Animal Man. I actually liked a fair few of the ideas around Fantomex, I just thought the execution was lacking in some spots. Much like Uncanny is about to, fill-in art kinda ripples some of the designs and story-telling.

    Quote Originally Posted by Su_Whisterfield View Post
    Could have been worse, could have been Rhyl. Or Wrexham.
    Or Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysilio gogogoch (longest-named town in Blighty)

    Quote Originally Posted by Icefanatic View Post
    Ian Churchill has said he based Iceman's look of off Joe Casey.

    Man, I was so excited that Ian Churchill was going to be drawing Iceman at the time... right up until he 'iced up'. The cool coat and shades then looked like a lab coat and 'geek glasses'. Epic fail.
    Harsh but...mostly fair! Thanks very much for confirming the Iceman/Casey comparison - much appreciated!


    Thanks for the feedback guys, should have the next issue up in the next couple of days (possibly tonight - middle chapters of storylines are oftena bit easier!)
    Last edited by Captain Buttocks; 02-07-2020 at 02:52 AM.

  3. #18
    Mighty Member Su_Whisterfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Buttocks View Post
    Or Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysilio gogogoch (longest-named town in Blighty
    Just off to Llandudno now, sunny day, going for walk on the Prom.

    Sugar can’t have been from Llandudno, she’s under the age of sixty. Not allowed to live there if you are under retirement age...

  4. #19
    Fantastic Member Captain Buttocks's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Su_Whisterfield View Post
    Just off to Llandudno now, sunny day, going for walk on the Prom.

    Sugar can’t have been from Llandudno, she’s under the age of sixty. Not allowed to live there if you are under retirement age...
    Don't spend too much in the arcades! (Although it's early in the day for gambling!)

  5. #20
    Mighty Member Su_Whisterfield's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,129

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Buttocks View Post
    Don't spend too much in the arcades! (Although it's early in the day for gambling!)
    There aren’t many in Llandudno, they might excite the residents too much. The one at the end of the pier was closed.
    Got five miles walking in, parked out near the Little Orme, walked to the end of the pier and back. Bloody cold wind.

    (For those not in the UK, wondering why Candy Kane coming from Llandudno is funny, it’s a seaside resort with lots of retirees, quiet back water, no nightclubs or anything like that, the only beats you hear are the synchronised thump of zimmer frames moving in unison towards Brexit.)

  6. #21
    Fantastic Member Captain Buttocks's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Uncanny X-Men #396 - The Glamorous Life

    Uncanny X-Men #396 hit comic store shelves on the 17th July 2001, shipping two weeks late. It sold a hugely impressive 132,705 copies to North American distributers according to diamond’s sales charts, which made it second for the month (once again, behind New X-Men).

    The creative team is once again Ian Churchill and Joe Casey, however this would be the final issue of Churchill’s run, leaving after only three issues.
    As this issue represents Ian Churchill’s final one on the book, let’s check in with Joe Casey regarding artwork:-

    “There was no consistent artistic vision to my stint on the book, which -- even in that bygone era of “Writer-driven” comics -- makes a big goddamn difference. Besides which, here are the artists I specifically brought to the X-party: Sean Phillips, Ashley Wood, Eddie Campbell, Javier Pulido. Compare that list to the artists that editors teamed me up with, without my input: Ian Churchill, Ron Garney, Aaron Lopestri. To me, those two lists are as stylistically different as night and day. Now, you can argue that the editors had more “mainstream” tastes and that I had more “alternative” tastes, but I know which type of artist I work better with. I didn’t stand up for myself the way I’ve learned to since then, and the book suffered because of it. Obviously, they're all skilled artists, but it’s rare that I’ll have that real, lasting, creative chemistry with artists that editors hook me up with (even when I get along with them, personally). Another lesson I learned the hard way.” (Joe Casey in conversation with Chad Nevett of CBR)

    There was never really a satisfactory explanation given for Ian Churchill’s abrupt departure from the books, although the most prominently offered one was that he decided the material wasn’t for him and just left. This does seem to square with Casey’s comments about creative chemistry (although we will take issue with some of his comments later on in the run). It’s very hard in hindsight to understand just what a massive headache Churchill leaving was for the X-offices as multiple books were running many weeks late at this point and there was a fair amount of ill-feeling towards Marvel over their two best-selling titles falling behind.

    Marvel also did not cover themselves in glory with their communication or indeed their contingency planning at this point, with woefully inconsistent fill-in artists being used (and in New X-Men’s case – a fill-in for a fill-in) and several “jam” issues with multiple pencillers and inkers. We’ll cover that more fully when we get to UXM #400.

    As for this issue, Casey continues the Poptopia storyline, with Chamber getting further involved with Sugar Kane, while the X-Men engage in a spot of fisticuffs with Mr Clean in the sewers. It’s one of the middle chapters of a four-part storyline so Casey gets around to fleshing out the lifestyle of Sugar Kane and the plot of Mr Clean, each to varying degrees of success.

    Sugar gives Chamber some chat about stardom being fleeting and enjoying the ride, and we see them at a couple of social gatherings in the circles she moves in, interestingly there’s also a passing reference made to the X-ranch, which we will encounter in the next story. It’s all a bit stereotypical, but decent enough. Sugar, at least at this moment, seems genuine enough although a few of the characters she meets are very one-note attempts at humour.

    Our plots intersect briefly as Iceman and Nightcrawler pop up to Chamber’s hotel room for a brief argument about the damage he is doing to the mutant cause. I’m not overtly thrilled by this as I’m not sure I follow Kurt’s argument that it’s bad for a mutant to be with a celebrity. He certainly has a point about it being a fad, but surely it’s a good thing? There’s also a moment which made me chuckle where Kurt teleports the amazing distance of about two feet just to shout at Jono. How lazy is Kurt?

    In the other (far less interesting) plot, the X-Men discover the remains of the Britlocks, and then have a fight with Mr Clean in the sewers which ends inconclusively. It’s all pretty mundane stuff, with some generic tough-guy chat from Mr Clean who still gets no development here, and the X-Men pretty much getting the worst of the confrontation. Mr Clean still appears to be nothing more than a bloke with a flamethrower (which gets destroyed) and some pistols and this isn’t really gripping stuff.

    Art-wise, Churchill still does a strong Chamber, a middling representation of everyone else, and as few backgrounds as possible. I have to give him huge credit for the cover in terms of both art and design – I think it’s absolutely stunning and one of the best UXM covers of all-time. Lovely stuff, and we would get another great cover from him next issue as his final entry in the series.

    Whilst never Churchill’s biggest fan, I feel like it’s a shame we didn’t get a full story-arc from him, purely to see if he might have grown into his role. As far as I am aware he has done no further work for the X-office since the end of his run here.

    How are our characters doing?

    Archangel – misses out on the chat with Jono as he is scanning for Mr Clean. Fares the worst in the sewer fight despite being the one to dispossess Mr Clean of his flamethrower, being stabbed in the back with dual knives. Still appears to be calling the shots, and comfortable in his role.

    Nightcrawler – has a pretty dreary moan at Jono and gets a smack in the face from Mr Clean after pulling a weird kung-fu pose. Not a shining issue for Kurt, who seems a bit of a misery-guts.

    Iceman – again gets the glib lines (one being oddly reminiscent of the Beast in the Genosha aftermath black humour vein) and doesn’t come off well during the scrap in the sewers, mostly just talking while Mr Clean kicks the crap outta everyone and shoots Bobby.

    Wolverine is again barely in the issue, showing up on the last page looking mean.

    Chamber has a row with the X-Men over them trying to run his life and has a point although he doesn’t make it very well. He’s again drawn well and seems consistent with the Gen X kid we all know and love.

    Who died and will HoXPoX resurrect them? This issue is casualty-free.

    What I Thought Then –It’s not quite ‘meh’, but definitely a bit ‘eh’. Lovely cover though.

    What I Think Now – Cover is great, art is iffy in places. The Britlocks have disappeared, Kurt is being whiny and Mr Clean is utterly forgettable. It’s not bad, it’s just not an issue that will grab you.

    Next issue – more lateness, Casey and the Neo-Nazis Part 1, Sean Phillips art, a classic cover and Archangel doesn’t like pubs. It’s Part 3 of Poptopia!
    Last edited by Captain Buttocks; 02-09-2020 at 03:14 PM. Reason: typo

  7. #22
    Mighty Member Thievery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    1,869

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Buttocks View Post

    A lot of Polaris fans also think Austen was great. I am a Polaris fan but I dont feel that every single other character in the comic needs to be written as utterly unobservant and dense just to give Lorna something interesting to do. I considered an issue-by-issue analysis of Chuck but it's been well covered by better writers than me elsewhere on the internet (I think Chris Sims did something similar)
    I'll agree that Austen made the rest of the X-Men look a little foolish for his Lorna story. The rest of the X-Men should have realized that Lorna was nuts as soon as she showed up, and tried to help her right away.

    Quote Originally Posted by Su_Whisterfield View Post
    There aren’t many in Llandudno, they might excite the residents too much. The one at the end of the pier was closed.
    Got five miles walking in, parked out near the Little Orme, walked to the end of the pier and back. Bloody cold wind.

    (For those not in the UK, wondering why Candy Kane coming from Llandudno is funny, it’s a seaside resort with lots of retirees, quiet back water, no nightclubs or anything like that, the only beats you hear are the synchronised thump of zimmer frames moving in unison towards Brexit.)
    Well, if that's the case, Casey probably made Sugar Kane's home town Llandudno as part of a joke.
    Last edited by Thievery; 02-10-2020 at 12:25 AM.

  8. #23
    Mighty Member Thievery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    1,869

    Default

    Getting back to the topic of Casey's X-Men, I kind of feel the same way about Poptopia as I did the Warp Savant issue. They read find, I mostly don't see a problem with them. They probably would have made more of an impact if they had come out right after Jim Lee and the other Image guys had left Marvel. I could see the Warp issue in particular gaining some buzz for reigniting Scott/Jean/Logan. And, Warp would have probably felt a little more novel at that time period. Stacey X would have definitely caused more of a stir if she had been introduced in the early 90's. Still think that he would have been better off starting with Stacey X, the X-Corp story, or the Vanisher. Just my opinion.

    Really, Casey's X-Men was pretty good. From what I gather from reading opinions on it, It just seems to be victimized by all of the hype surrounding it.

    I didn't mind reading them. How were the comics received online as they were being released? Did the old guard fans at the time like them or not?
    Last edited by Thievery; 02-10-2020 at 12:25 AM.

  9. #24
    Fantastic Member Captain Buttocks's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thievery View Post
    Getting back to the topic of Casey's X-Men, I kind of feel the same way about Poptopia as I did the Warp Savant issue. They read find, I mostly don't see a problem with them. They probably would have made more of an impact if they had come out right after Jim Lee and the other Image guys had left Marvel. I could see the Warp issue in particular gaining some buzz for reigniting Scott/Jean/Logan. And, Warp would have probably felt a little more novel at that time period. Stacey X would have definitely caused more of a stir if she had been introduced in the early 90's. Still think that he would have been better off starting with Stacey X, the X-Corp story, or the Vanisher. Just my opinion.
    The trouble was that the Scott/Jean/Logan thing really went nowhere. I cant see Marvel allowing a character like Stacey X in the 90s under the Harras/DeFalco regime, especially when they were still signed up to the Comics Code Authority

    Really, Casey's X-Men was pretty good. From what I gather from reading opinions on it, It just seems to be victimized by all of the hype surrounding it.

    I didn't mind reading them. How were the comics received online as they were being released? Did the old guard fans at the time like them or not?
    At the time, with online fandom in it's first "consistent" stage, it was very poorly received. Paul O'Brien of House to Astonish said until the Austen run it was the worst-received run on Uncanny ever. By the end of his run, Uncanny had slipped out of the top 10 for the first time since records were kept, and Casey had lost 40,000 sales (again - going by diamond North America).

    I'll discuss how fair/unfair that criticism was as we move forwards thanks again for the interesting comments/discussion points!

  10. #25
    Fantastic Member Captain Buttocks's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Uncanny X-Men #397 – A Complete Unknown

    Uncanny X-Men #397 hit comic store shelves on the 29th August 2001, shipping *four* weeks late. It sold a hefty 132,181 copies to North American distributers according to diamond’s sales charts, which made it second for the month (behind New X-Men).

    With Ian Churchill leaving abruptly and Marvel clearly struggling for a replacement artist, fill-in duties fell to Sean Phillips doing layouts and Mel Rubi the finished pencils. As mentioned above, the artistic flux was causing the book to run extremely late (although not as late as New X-Men) hence the multiple artists.

    The Poptopia storyline continues merrily along, with Casey fleshing out more of the background characters. We start with a look at Sugar Kane’s entourage and lifestyle. She goes to a party full of one-dimensional characters and has a one-dimensional bigot manager who employs some one-dimensional bodyguards. Sugar does still seem genuine in her affections for Chamber but Sim (the manager) warns Jono off, and one of the bodyguards gets a good slapping from Wolverine who pops into the toilets to give Jono another lecture (why was Jono using the toilet?). At the end of the issue a tabloid newspaper prints the story that Sugar is pregnant and Sim is ranting and raving. Ho-hum.

    Elsewhere, the Britlocks pop up again and seem like a pleasant if uninteresting bunch, having a wee bit of explanatory chat amongst themselves as they keep trying to move through the sewers and remain one step ahead of Mr Clean. We learn most of their names, but it’s thankfully a touch more subtle then the Claremont-style splash page introductions that were a hallmark of his second abortive run on the books.

    Mr Clean gets a page where he communicates with his employers, and we get our first reference to the Church of Humanity. It’s pretty uninspiring fare, but he finally let’s us know that he’s been “engineered” by the church to allow him to compete with the mutants. There are references to the Vicar General and the Supreme Pontiff and I shall resist the obvious Chuck Austen jokes at this point.

    Now – personal digression – I’m not a religious person, however the Church of Humanity already sounds like a bad idea. Religion has popped up a few times in the X-books, most memorably in God Loves, Man Kills and is a tricky topic, especially with the expanded pantheon of the Marvel Universe. Anyway, we’ll give Casey the benefit of the doubt at this point.

    There are a couple of memorable bits in this issue. It’s nice to see Wolverine, Iceman and Nightcrawler sinking a few beers in the boozer at the start and there’s a confrontation with some (sigh) one-dimensional neo-Nazi sorts in the subway, which Iceman finishes quickly, to the applause of passers-by which is a nice touch.

    Phillips and Rubi provide a low-key fill-in job, with some crisp art and some expressive faces. It’s serviceable and very pleasant in places, but both are obviously trying to be quite neutral so the eventual trade paperback wont look ridiculous (alas, next issue would scupper that). Generally I like it. There’s another nice intro page, some decent body language and Sugar looks less ridiculous.

    Once again I have to draw attention to the cover by Ian Churchill was is fabulous, original, well-drawn and well-coloured. Very good and a real eye-catcher on the shelves. I’m adding a cover-rating to the summary now.

    How are our characters doing?

    Archangel skips the festivities in the pub but meets up with Kurt and Bobby in the subway for the scuffle with the skinheads.

    Nightcrawler is far chirpier than last issue, presumably pleased at finally being drawn with a smile on his face.

    Iceman gets to show-off by icing up the subway thugs and smashing their boombox (vandalism!).

    Wolverine gets briefed by Kurt and Bobby in the pub and then goes to give Chamber a lecture, before doing his tough man schtick with one of the bodyguards. It’s Wolverine 101, but it’s decent enough.

    Chamber tries to fit in with Sugar’s lifestyle, but is a little bit passive in this issue as the focus switches to Sugar and her entourage, which isn’t exactly gripping reading given how one-note they are.

    Who died and will HoXPoX resurrect them? Nobody.

    Best cover thus far – this one *just* edges out 396, but it’s a tough call.

    Worst cover thus far – 394

    What I Thought Then – The cover is the best part of this. The rest is boring, when’s New X-Men out? (Amusingly enough, NXM #117 was SIX weeks late, as Marvel hired the only artist slower than Quitely to do fill-in work)

    What I Think Now – Actually, this is some Perfectly Acceptable X-Men-ing™. I actually prefer the art to Churchill’s, and the subway sequence was nice. The background characters don’t work though.

    Next issue – that “amazing creative synergy” Joe Casey was talking about with specific artists gets the first of three well-deserved kickings, and I swither between fog, sepia and haze to describe the art, before realising it’s all of the above. Yup – the final part of Poptopia is apparently in there too!

  11. #26
    All-New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Interesting thread...

    ... can't wait to see how it all shakes out.

  12. #27
    Fantastic Member Captain Buttocks's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Casey View Post
    Interesting thread...

    ... can't wait to see how it all shakes out.
    Hi Joe - thanks for dropping by! I hope you aren't too unhappy with anything I've said.

    Cheeky question - do you know who contributed the cover for UXM 405? It's one of my faves but I cant find it credited anywhere... at a guess I'd say Sean Phillips but I'm not 100%.

  13. #28
    Mighty Member Thievery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    1,869

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Buttocks View Post
    The trouble was that the Scott/Jean/Logan thing really went nowhere. I cant see Marvel allowing a character like Stacey X in the 90s under the Harras/DeFalco regime, especially when they were still signed up to the Comics Code Authority
    Ah, I think that Scott/Jean/Logan would have had some more legs back during the early 90's. It was still fairly popular back then, if I have my X-history correct. I read the triangle stories stories in hindsight. It would have probably been nice to see a little more of the triangle just to see it resolved once and for all. Reading the stories about Scott/Jean/Logan during Inferno and in that time period was all right. These days I honestly wish that the triangle would just go away. Hell, I wish that Scott and Jean had never gotten married n the first place, and wish that couple would go away also.

    As far as Stacey goes, it's possible that she wouldn't have been allowed back then. But, I believe that Daredevil's girlfriend had been a stripper. Could be wrong about that, seeing as I now very little about Daredevil. And, it's not like Stacey was shown having sex with her clients. She even told them that there was a no touching rule. Also, heros like Wolverine and Punisher were killing villains back then. I have no problems with heroes killing bad guys, but is killing really worse than sex?

    Now, on to issue 397.

    I think that Chamber and Sugar Kane get some nice character work.
    I haven't mentioned it yet, but Iceman get's some good character work that wouldn't be out of pace in todays comics.
    Nightcrwalers work is a matter of taste, I guess. He was written as being a bit mopey during some of Casey's issues.

    I think that I prefer Churchill's art on Poptopia. I like Phillips and Ruby, but I prefer one artist at a time on one single issue. Phillips would do some really great work on Casey's X-Men later on.

    As for the covers, I think that I prefer 396 to 397. But I like all the covers that have been used so far. And, there are later covers that I think that Iliked more than these three. So cover artwork was definitely good during Casey's X-Men.

    I'm not particularly religuos, but I don't mind religious villains being used if done well. I think that the best use of them is to make them Magnet type characters. Villains who think that they are in the right, but don't realize how far off the tracks that they have gone. People that have become that which they hate. And, they don't have to be portrayed as raving lunitics in every panel.
    Last edited by Thievery; 02-11-2020 at 10:19 AM.

  14. #29
    All-New Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Buttocks View Post
    do you know who contributed the cover for UXM 405? It's one of my faves but I cant find it credited anywhere... at a guess I'd say Sean Phillips but I'm not 100%.
    That was Sean. Great cover.

  15. #30
    Fantastic Member Captain Buttocks's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Edinburgh, Scotland
    Posts
    265

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Thievery View Post
    Ah, I think that Scott/Jean/Logan would have had some more legs back during the early 90's. It was still fairly popular back then, if I have my X-history correct. I read the triangle stories stories in hindsight. It would have probably been nice to see a little more of the triangle just to see it resolved once and for all. Reading the stories about Scott/Jean/Logan during Inferno and in that time period was all right. These days I honestly wish that the triangle would just go away. Hell, I wish that Scott and Jean had never gotten married n the first place, and wish that couple would go away also.
    Love triangles have never really been my thing in X-Men. I felt Scott/Jean/Logan was overdone by that point anyway, and Scott and jean had been married eight years or so (our time).

    As far as Stacey goes, it's possible that she wouldn't have been allowed back then. But, I believe that Daredevil's girlfriend had been a stripper. Could be wrong about that, seeing as I now very little about Daredevil. And, it's not like Stacey was shown having sex with her clients. She even told them that there was a no touching rule. Also, heros like Wolverine and Punisher were killing villains back then. I have no problems with heroes killing bad guys, but is killing really worse than sex?
    Depends on how you have sex I suppose !

    Now, on to issue 397.

    I think that Chamber and Sugar Kane get some nice character work.
    I haven't mentioned it yet, but Iceman get's some good character work that wouldn't be out of pace in todays comics.
    Nightcrwalers work is a matter of taste, I guess. He was written as being a bit mopey during some of Casey's issues.
    I think Casey's best work with Kurt is yet to come, although I'm already warming up the Random Untranslated German annoyance factor...(I did German in school, so I really shouldnt need auto-translate)

    I think that I prefer Churchill's art on Poptopia. I like Phillips and Ruby, but I prefer one artist at a time on one single issue. Phillips would do some really great work on Casey's X-Men later on.
    Agree with you on Phillips. Can certainly respect your point on Churchill but he's never quite been my cup of tea.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Casey View Post
    That was Sean. Great cover.
    Thank you - and yes, it's terrific!
    Last edited by Captain Buttocks; 02-12-2020 at 02:12 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •