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  1. #1

    Default What are the most important Spider-Man comics of the 1960s?

    I've asked about this with every other decade, so what are the most important Spider-Man comics of his first decade?

    My guesses...
    10. Amazing Spider-Man #6: It's the first Lizard/ Curt Connors, and the first time Spider-Man leaves New York.
    9. Amazing Spider-Man #50: It has some of the most iconic moments in the series, and the debut of the Kingpin.
    8. Amazing Spider-Man #42: First Mary Jane
    7. Amazing Spider-Man #14: First Green Goblin
    6. Amazing Spider-Man #3: First Doctor Octopus
    5. Amazing Spider-Man #2: The first appearance of the Vulture. Peter Parker gets a job at the Daily Bugle.
    4. Amazing Spider-Man #39-40: The Green Goblin is unmasked, allowing him to remain Spider-Man's archenemy even when the mystery is resolved. John Romita Sr takes over as artist, allowing the book to thrive after the departure of Ditko. It could very well have not happened that way.
    3. Amazing Spider-Man #31-33: It has a few defining moments, as well as the first appearances of Gwen Stacy & Harry Osborn, and Peter Parker starting college.
    2. Amazing Spider-Man #1: It's the first regular issue, first crossover with the Marvel Universe, first recurring villain, and the first appearance of J. Jonah Jameson. This also kicks off the idea that Spider-Man isn't going to be very popular within the Marvel Universe
    1. Amazing Fantasy #15: Nuff said

    What say you guys?

  2. #2
    Astonishing Member Revolutionary_Jack's Avatar
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    I kind of think that almost everything in the 60s was important. But anyway:

    1) AF#15 -- Spider-Man's origin story which was so good that it led to the launch of an ongoing months after its publication and the cancellation of Amazing Fantasy.

    2) ASM #1 -- J. Jonah Jameson's first appearance.

    3) ASM Annual #1 -- First appearance of the Sinister Six, which also provided a showcase of Spider-Man's rogues gallery -- Dr. Octopus, Mysterio, Kraven the Hunter, Vulture, Electro, the Sandman).

    4) ASM #31-33 -- "If this be my destiny/Master Planner" which introduced major parts of Peter's supporting cast. Images and bits of this story remain relevant and constantly referenced and alluded to.

    5) ASM #5 -- This is the issue where Spider-Man fights Doctor Doom. It's important because Doom is the first Marvel-wide rogue Spider-Man fights, and likewise, Spider-Man is the first non-FF hero Doom fights. This issue cemented Spider-Man and Doom as respectively major Marvel-Wide characters, with Doom's dynamic with Spidey proving his versatility to menace virtually any hero Marvel can create from now onwards, while Spider-Man's tussle with Doom sets the stage for later encounters with Juggernaut and Firelord to name a few.

    6) ASM #39-40 -- This two-part issue is the first Post-Ditko one and the first with Romita Sr. It was a test as to whether Spider-Man could continue without the art (and more than that) of co-creator Ditko. It also had to resolve the Green Goblin mystery set up from before in a way that provided a decent payoff while also confirming Green Goblin's threat and menace level. Somehow it succeeded and this issue was a major success and iconic elements that endure to this day. Also the first ASM comic that both DeMatteis and Roger Stern read.

    7) ASM #42-43 -- The first on-panel appearance of Mary Jane Watson. As with Goblin, Romita Sr. had to provide a payoff to a Ditko-era subplot that lived up to the long build-up (MJ was first mentioned in ASM#15, so 27 issues in the making). Romita Sr. not only succeeded but exceeded expectations and provided an iconic and charismatic character introduction, as well as introduced the most important character in the stories after Peter Parker in the process. Also first appearance of Rhino, Romita Sr's first major new villain and an enduring Post-Ditko Rogue (that some actually think was made by him since it so clearly fits the theme and design principles of his rogues). MJ's characterization here, someone who likes both Peter and Spider-Man, who accommodates both roles, as when she helps Peter go the fight with Rhino also highlights the role she would eventually occupy.

    8) ASM #50-52 -- "Spider-Man No More", iconic splash image, cover, and recurring theme and motif. As well as first appearance of Kingpin, and more importantly first appearance of Joseph "Robbie" Robertson, a major supporting character and the first and longest-lasting and most important African-American supporting character in Spider-Man, an attempt by Lee, now that the Civil Rights was slowly becoming mainstream, to introduce diversity to what had been an all-white ensemble at the outset. Also featured the death of Frederick Foswell, major Ditko-era supporting character, which proved that violence would never be far in Spider-Man.

    9) ASM #47 -- This comic was a major touchstone in Spider-Man Blue and Spider-Man Life Story #1. The opening has a flashback retcon that reveals that Green Goblin had dealings with Kraven before his amnesia, which leads Kraven to attack Norman post-amnesia in the present. This is essentially the first Untold Tales of Spider-Man, with Stan Lee introducing a new story in a status-quo that had been broken in present but done so in a way that didn't contradict what had been established. The comic also had Flash Thompson going to Vietnam, with Peter wishing him goodbye. It also codified the Peter-MJ-Gwen romantic triangle, with the famous dance scene (reproduced in Blue, To have and to Hold).

    10) ASM #28 -- This issue featured the most lasting status-quo change of Peter graduating high school and going to college, going from teenager to young adult. After this one had to wait until ASM Annual #21, and unfortunately after OMD, one is yet again in a position of waiting.

  3. #3
    Kinky Lil' Canine Snoop Dogg's Avatar
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    in what issue does he bang under a desk
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  4. #4
    Mighty Member tbaron's Avatar
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    I cant think of a top ten like you guys. But one I would add to the list is Amazing Spiderman 16. It is his first meeting with Daredevil. It is also his first team up with another Marvel Superhero. He had met The Fantastic Four but he didnt team up with them to battle a villain like he did with Daredevil.
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  5. #5
    Astonishing Member Revolutionary_Jack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tbaron View Post
    I cant think of a top ten like you guys. But one I would add to the list is Amazing Spiderman 16. It is his first meeting with Daredevil. It is also his first team up with another Marvel Superhero. He had met The Fantastic Four but he didnt team up with them to battle a villain like he did with Daredevil.
    He did meet Incredible Hulk in ASM#14, though that was one where Spider-Man was fighting and running away from Hulk rather than teaming up with him.

    So I guess you are right.

  6. #6
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    Spider-Man and Human Torch teamed up in Strange Tales Annual #2, released the same time as Amazing Spider-Man #4. http://www.angelfire.com/comics/mcg-sac/1963.html

  7. #7
    Mighty Member tbaron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee View Post
    Spider-Man and Human Torch teamed up in Strange Tales Annual #2, released the same time as Amazing Spider-Man #4. http://www.angelfire.com/comics/mcg-sac/1963.html
    Oh man. I have never read that. That you for the info. Now I feel kind of foolish lol
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  8. #8

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    Some very important stories are listed here, but I also feel these stories are significant as well.


    Amazing Spider-Man 17-19 should be considered as one of the most important arcs, it defined what fragility of people a hero cares about adds to the weight of heroics and the burden that comes with them, without the cliched "villain is endangering my loved one". Plus it cemented Flash Thompson's position as a Spider-Man fan and advocate, paving way to how much influence a nerd can have on their bullies and how it informed the life of Eugene Thompson moving on.

    Amazing Spider-Man 16: Spider-Man's first actual team-up in his own book.

    Amazing Spider-Man 24: Mysterio coming to the Daily Bugle with his idea that Spider-Man is mentally ill and driving him to see a psychiatrist. The realization that a villain almost drove him to unmask himself helped cement the strong mind and will of our friendly neighborhood Spider-Man for future encounters like the one he had experiencing Goblin's hallucination gas bombs and overcoming them in Spectacular Magazine issue 2.

    Amazing Spider-Man 53-56: A lot of vital development with Doctor Octopus, starting with his image in the mind of Aunt May.
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  9. #9
    Extraordinary Member Celgress's Avatar
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    There are honestly so many important 1960s stories it is hard for me to narrow it down to just ten. AF #1 has to be number one, its placement is a no-brainer. Still, with that said, I think Mets did about the best one could do with his top ten. Kudos on another job well down Mets.
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Revolutionary_Jack View Post
    I kind of think that almost everything in the 60s was important. But anyway:

    1) AF#15 -- Spider-Man's origin story which was so good that it led to the launch of an ongoing months after its publication and the cancellation of Amazing Fantasy.

    2) ASM #1 -- J. Jonah Jameson's first appearance.

    3) ASM Annual #1 -- First appearance of the Sinister Six, which also provided a showcase of Spider-Man's rogues gallery -- Dr. Octopus, Mysterio, Kraven the Hunter, Vulture, Electro, the Sandman).

    4) ASM #31-33 -- "If this be my destiny/Master Planner" which introduced major parts of Peter's supporting cast. Images and bits of this story remain relevant and constantly referenced and alluded to.

    5) ASM #5 -- This is the issue where Spider-Man fights Doctor Doom. It's important because Doom is the first Marvel-wide rogue Spider-Man fights, and likewise, Spider-Man is the first non-FF hero Doom fights. This issue cemented Spider-Man and Doom as respectively major Marvel-Wide characters, with Doom's dynamic with Spidey proving his versatility to menace virtually any hero Marvel can create from now onwards, while Spider-Man's tussle with Doom sets the stage for later encounters with Juggernaut and Firelord to name a few.

    6) ASM #39-40 -- This two-part issue is the first Post-Ditko one and the first with Romita Sr. It was a test as to whether Spider-Man could continue without the art (and more than that) of co-creator Ditko. It also had to resolve the Green Goblin mystery set up from before in a way that provided a decent payoff while also confirming Green Goblin's threat and menace level. Somehow it succeeded and this issue was a major success and iconic elements that endure to this day. Also the first ASM comic that both DeMatteis and Roger Stern read.

    7) ASM #42-43 -- The first on-panel appearance of Mary Jane Watson. As with Goblin, Romita Sr. had to provide a payoff to a Ditko-era subplot that lived up to the long build-up (MJ was first mentioned in ASM#15, so 27 issues in the making). Romita Sr. not only succeeded but exceeded expectations and provided an iconic and charismatic character introduction, as well as introduced the most important character in the stories after Peter Parker in the process. Also first appearance of Rhino, Romita Sr's first major new villain and an enduring Post-Ditko Rogue (that some actually think was made by him since it so clearly fits the theme and design principles of his rogues). MJ's characterization here, someone who likes both Peter and Spider-Man, who accommodates both roles, as when she helps Peter go the fight with Rhino also highlights the role she would eventually occupy.

    8) ASM #50-52 -- "Spider-Man No More", iconic splash image, cover, and recurring theme and motif. As well as first appearance of Kingpin, and more importantly first appearance of Joseph "Robbie" Robertson, a major supporting character and the first and longest-lasting and most important African-American supporting character in Spider-Man, an attempt by Lee, now that the Civil Rights was slowly becoming mainstream, to introduce diversity to what had been an all-white ensemble at the outset. Also featured the death of Frederick Foswell, major Ditko-era supporting character, which proved that violence would never be far in Spider-Man.

    9) ASM #47 -- This comic was a major touchstone in Spider-Man Blue and Spider-Man Life Story #1. The opening has a flashback retcon that reveals that Green Goblin had dealings with Kraven before his amnesia, which leads Kraven to attack Norman post-amnesia in the present. This is essentially the first Untold Tales of Spider-Man, with Stan Lee introducing a new story in a status-quo that had been broken in present but done so in a way that didn't contradict what had been established. The comic also had Flash Thompson going to Vietnam, with Peter wishing him goodbye. It also codified the Peter-MJ-Gwen romantic triangle, with the famous dance scene (reproduced in Blue, To have and to Hold).

    10) ASM #28 -- This issue featured the most lasting status-quo change of Peter graduating high school and going to college, going from teenager to young adult. After this one had to wait until ASM Annual #21, and unfortunately after OMD, one is yet again in a position of waiting.
    I'm noticing that you're not picking the first appearances of any major villains. Is there a reason for that?

    Do you feel that it is more important that the Green Goblin is Norman Osborn than that Spider-Man encountered a bad guy for the first time in Amazing Spider-Man #14?

    Quote Originally Posted by tbaron View Post
    Oh man. I have never read that. That you for the info. Now I feel kind of foolish lol
    It's one of the most obscure early Spider-Man adventures.

    It doesn't appear in Amazing Spider-Man, or even the Fantastic Four proper.

  11. #11
    Astonishing Member Revolutionary_Jack's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    I'm noticing that you're not picking the first appearances of any major villains. Is there a reason for that?
    As I said, practically everything in the '60s was important. If you do "firsts" you can list practically everything. So I focused on nodal issues or key ones as well as highlight stuff that are important in ways people haven't noticed:
    -- The first Annual of the Sinister Six is a big showcase for Ditko's best rogues, showing all of them in a flash, and as such cementing Spider-Man's regular roster, while also featuring an iconic super-villain team-up. So that seems more important to me than listing the firsts of each character. In the case of Kraven, his most important story is decades away. Vulture's best stories would be Roger Stern's.
    -- I also highlighted ASM#5 as a "first" because it's more significant from a MU perspective. Spidey's first encounter with a Marvel-wide villain, and likewise Doctor Doom's first encounter with a non-FF hero. That set the stage for Doom to ultimately become the central villain of the Marvel Universe.

    Do you feel that it is more important that the Green Goblin is Norman Osborn than that Spider-Man encountered a bad guy for the first time in Amazing Spider-Man #14?
    The first appearances of characters are not always the determining stories of those characters. Like in the case of Doctor Octopus, it wasn't until the Master Planner Saga that he sported his iconic green-and-orange jumpsuit that has been his default outfit since then, going forward. In Green Goblin's first appearance, he rode a jet-broomstick, and didn't get his glider until the second story where he attacked Peter's high school.

    I might prefer the Crime Master 2-Parter or for that matter ASM#14 from a storytelling and art perspective but there's no doubt that ASM#39-40 is a far more important story in terms of the Green Goblin's history. That story made Green Goblin learn of Spider-Man's identity, and likewise revealed he was Norman Osborn. That stuff never really happened in a superhero story before, it didn't happen to Batman or Superman for instance at the time (later in the 70s Denny O'Neil had Ra's Al Ghul and later Englehart had Hugo Strange learn Batman's identity).

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snoop Dogg View Post
    in what issue does he bang under a desk
    Its the issue right after MJ figures out Peter is actually Spider-Man, and a while after Cindy gets bitten by the radioactive spider.
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