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  2. #2
    The Comixeur Mel Dyer's Avatar
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    Good start.

    Etta sounds like Etta. Steve has added a third female character, a methodical personality to contrast Etta's wild daring. Both women embody different aspects of Diana's personality, making the three of them together a well spring of situation comedy, drama, etc...a sustainable one, for the right writers. Good start!

    Looking forward to seeing how Steve or some other male side-order characters will be worked into the narrative. Does returning her to Boston mean that Perez's heroic Hercules will be in play? I hope so.
    Last edited by Mel Dyer; 02-09-2020 at 09:19 PM.
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  3. #3
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    I'm looking forward to seeing the whole issue. I was excited when it was announced that Duursema was filling in; I think her only other work with Wondy beyond the odd cover was the pre-crisis #300 issue. The art in the preview doesn't quite meet my memories of her excellent work on Arion & on Star Wars back in the day, but I'm not mad at it.

    There's nothing new in the idea of a city being anxious about the damage from metahuman battles, but I find the idea of an agent assessing whether or not a superhero is too dangerous to have living there curious. What would the remedy be if she's deemed too dangerous? Dis-inviting her? A court order excluding her from city limits?

    Also, iirc, in the Loebs' run, Diana went on a rampage in Boston in search of Vanessa, who'd been kidnapped. The story had the misfortune to be badly drawn - it was in that period where a bunch of young artists were "auditioning" issue after issue (although that period yielded Deodato) - but I wonder if that story is still canon? It could certainly be a "we've been through this kind of thing with you before" point.

  4. #4
    Astonishing Member OBrianTallent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank View Post
    I'm looking forward to seeing the whole issue. I was excited when it was announced that Duursema was filling in; I think her only other work with Wondy beyond the odd cover was the pre-crisis #300 issue. The art in the preview doesn't quite meet my memories of her excellent work on Arion & on Star Wars back in the day, but I'm not mad at it.

    There's nothing new in the idea of a city being anxious about the damage from metahuman battles, but I find the idea of an agent assessing whether or not a superhero is too dangerous to have living there curious. What would the remedy be if she's deemed too dangerous? Dis-inviting her? A court order excluding her from city limits?

    Also, iirc, in the Loebs' run, Diana went on a rampage in Boston in search of Vanessa, who'd been kidnapped. The story had the misfortune to be badly drawn - it was in that period where a bunch of young artists were "auditioning" issue after issue (although that period yielded Deodato) - but I wonder if that story is still canon? It could certainly be a "we've been through this kind of thing with you before" point.
    I have to wonder if perhaps this wasnt an ideal inked for her...definitely some serious differences in her style.

  5. #5
    Mighty Member Koriand'r's Avatar
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    I liked the art, Wonder Woman was especially pretty this issue.

  6. #6
    Relic Seeker Pinsir's Avatar
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    You'd think with a character like WW you'd get more sexual depictions of her, but we really don't.
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  7. #7
    Mighty Member Koriand'r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinsir View Post
    You'd think with a character like WW you'd get more sexual depictions of her, but we really don't.
    I don't see Diana as "sexy". Lynda Carter certainly was and Gal Gadot has her moments, but the comics version is rarely blatantly drawn that way and she was so virginal for so long and is such an icon, it's kind of like saying Ruth Bader Ginsburg is sexy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ascended View Post
    Or the statue of liberty. I know Diana is supposed to be almost ungodly beautiful, but I just can't look at her, even the beautiful women who have played her in live action, and thought "Yeah, I'd hit it." It's Wonder Woman, you perverts! She can and should be comfortable with her sexuality and good for Steve, you lucky bastard you, but the idea of cuddling up to her feels almost indecent.

  8. #8
    Astonishing Member KangMiRae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Koriand'r View Post
    I don't see Diana as "sexy". Lynda Carter certainly was and Gal Gadot has her moments, but the comics version is rarely blatantly drawn that way and she was so virginal for so long and is such an icon, it's kind of like saying Ruth Bader Ginsburg is sexy.
    I think most would disagree. Wonder Woman has always meant to have some level of sexual appeal.
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  9. #9
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    I think most would disagree. Wonder Woman has always meant to have some level of sexual appeal.
    Yeah. In fact she was designed to be strong but still have a womanly character. She likes shopping a lot for exemple.

  10. #10
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
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    I think it largely depends on what is meant by "sexiness".

    If we take the stereotypical male gaze (really a combination of specific posings and perspectives) comics Diana is seldom "sexy" nowadays. But there is more than one way to be sexy. But the thing about the "male gaze" (though not necessarily unique to it) is that the subject is you the viewer, and the object the character on the page (or screen). For myself, I don't find that particularly sexy anymore, but that's how my sensibilities have evolved.

    I think most writers and artists of Diana take care to avoid the male gaze with Diana. That doesn't mean other ways to express sexiness cannot be used, but it means one must learn to see and appreciate them. Wonder Woman #61 by Xermanico is one good example. Look at how Aphrodite is presented, both with facial expressions and posture in the first two pages. The very first picture has her assessing Steve Trevor, and that assessment has a sexual element. She is more neutral (or as neutral as Aphrodite can be) until the last frame on the next page, where again she is drawn in a sexy pose, but again she is presented as a sexual subject, and her sexuality is directed at Steve; it's not an object for the reader.

    And if you find women who present themselves as confident and strong to be sexy, then Wonder Woman should be a feast.
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  11. #11
    Mighty Member Koriand'r's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjn View Post
    I think it largely depends on what is meant by "sexiness".

    If we take the stereotypical male gaze (really a combination of specific posings and perspectives) comics Diana is seldom "sexy" nowadays. But there is more than one way to be sexy. But the thing about the "male gaze" (though not necessarily unique to it) is that the subject is you the viewer, and the object the character on the page (or screen). For myself, I don't find that particularly sexy anymore, but that's how my sensibilities have evolved.

    I think most writers and artists of Diana take care to avoid the male gaze with Diana. That doesn't mean other ways to express sexiness cannot be used, but it means one must learn to see and appreciate them. Wonder Woman #61 by Xermanico is one good example. Look at how Aphrodite is presented, both with facial expressions and posture in the first two pages. The very first picture has her assessing Steve Trevor, and that assessment has a sexual element. She is more neutral (or as neutral as Aphrodite can be) until the last frame on the next page, where again she is drawn in a sexy pose, but again she is presented as a sexual subject, and her sexuality is directed at Steve; it's not an object for the reader.

    And if you find women who present themselves as confident and strong to be sexy, then Wonder Woman should be a feast.
    Sexiness is far more than visual. Saw Birds of Prey recently so I'll use that as an example. To me Margot Robbie isn't sexy in it, like at all, yet the same woman playing the same character was sexy in Suicide Squad. You'd think that be because her costuming was so different and the attire in the second film was toned drastically down, but that's not all of it. Robbie as producer and star of her own vehicle played her slightly differently. She emphasized the craziness and cuteness instead of the sensual and seductive.

    Wonder Woman never emphasizes the sensual or seductive as part of her personality. You can put her in the smallest thong and pose her that way, but it doesn't come across naturally from so pristine a character. That has nothing to do with power fantasies or her being a strong woman, she's just seems so far above baser instincts.

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