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  1. #16
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    In addition to what the others have mentioned, it seems that the companies changed their production. This applies to Marvel primarily because for a good chunk of their history, the “Marvel house style” gave a lot of input to the artists. In some cases all the writers did was put words in the mouths of the characters while the artists did all the layouts and plotting (that’s part of the reason why guys like Kirby all the way to Liefeld claim a lot of creative control over the work they did at Marvel). That’s not to say that the writer did nothing but a good chunk of the work was left in the hands of the artists. In the past, Marvel sold their books primarily on the strength of their art and it’s safe to say that back in the day, the artists ruled the roost.

    After the Image exodus, Marvel downplayed this (for several reasons one of which being that Image took a huge chunk of their market share and were the number 2 comic publisher) and when Quesada came in, he deliberately shifted focus to the writers and started bringing in guys from Vertigo and guys that had done prose without much comic book work. Hence guys like Bendis becoming the top guy at Marvel. So much so that Axel Alonso almost entirely downplayed the role of the artist (which was a very foolish position to take because comics are a visual medium).

    Since the Quesada takeover, I can’t think of a single new superstar artist that made the sort of impact the Image guys did. Even moderns day superstars like Capullo and Bennet came up in the 90s (Capullo drew Spawn for a very long time). Most of the comic artists that can sell books came from that era and or worked at Image. Funny thing is, the Image guys- particularly Jim Lee- can still move comics on the strength of their names alone. When Portacio and Silvestri came back to Marvel, they books they worked on were top sellers. But with the emphasis now so much on the writers, I’m not sure those days will ever come back again.
    "Obviously not all conservatives are racists/bigots but all racists/bigots claim to be conservative"- Unknown

  2. #17
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNewGod View Post
    ...also because writers can craft books and screenplays. Illustrators that can't write, can't do that.
    That's a good point. Writers are more likely to come from outside of comics, or to do work outside of comics that raises their profile.
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  3. #18
    Astonishing Member jetengine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    That's a good point. Writers are more likely to come from outside of comics, or to do work outside of comics that raises their profile.
    I knew Dan Abnett long before I got into comics for his 40k Books. Until I got into comics the only artist I could MAYBE name would have been Jack Kirby because of the consistent linking of his name to multiple Marvel characters origins

  4. #19
    Astonishing Member MRP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetengine View Post
    I knew Dan Abnett long before I got into comics for his 40k Books. Until I got into comics the only artist I could MAYBE name would have been Jack Kirby because of the consistent linking of his name to multiple Marvel characters origins
    That's kind of ironic, because Annett started in comics as an inker teamed with Andy Lanning, then the ream got a chance to write comics together as well as ink, and Abnett parlayed that into a gig writing 40K novels, which as I understand it, was one of the things that led to the Abnett/Lanning team fracturing. So without his comic work, he would never have gotten the 40K gigs.



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  5. #20
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    Because they tend to also work outside of the comic industry -- even though I know more comic artists than writers by their style.

    Opena is why I started reading X-Factor again. Pichelli is why I read Spider-Man and Guardians of the Galaxy. Seinkiewicz is why I read the New Mutants. Bachalo is why I read Shade the Changing Man. Noto is why I read Black Widow. Leonardi is why I read Cloak and Dagger. Middleton is why I read NYX. Alphona is why I read Runaways and Ms. Marvel. Coipel is why I read Avengers. Campbell got me into Gen 13 while Ramos got me into DV8. Travis Charest piqued my interest in Wildcats once his talent developed to the level that I could no longer overlook it.

    Rick Leonardi, Arthur Adams, Paul Smith, John Byrne, Barry Windsor-Smith, Alan Davis, Neal Adams, Larry Stroman, Jim Lee, Stuart Immomen, Carlos Pacheco, Salvador Larocca (etc) are why I read the X-Books during their respective eras.

    Conversely, Rob Leifield is why I quit reading the New Mutants -- and by reading I mean buying.

    I have no problem buying a good-looking, badly written book but won't do the same for bad artwork unless the writing is Gaiman level.

    That said, as someone who both writes and illustrates, I can understand why writers tend to draw more attention outside of the industry.

    Edit: Opena did X-Force -- not X-Factor. On a related note, when he left I realized Remender wasn't why I read the book.
    Last edited by aja_christopher; 04-10-2020 at 02:30 PM.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Username taken View Post
    ...But with the emphasis now so much on the writers, I’m not sure those days will ever come back again.
    Never say never.

  7. #22
    Mighty Member LordMikel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Username taken View Post
    In addition to what the others have mentioned, it seems that the companies changed their production. This applies to Marvel primarily because for a good chunk of their history, the “Marvel house style” gave a lot of input to the artists. In some cases all the writers did was put words in the mouths of the characters while the artists did all the layouts and plotting (that’s part of the reason why guys like Kirby all the way to Liefeld claim a lot of creative control over the work they did at Marvel). That’s not to say that the writer did nothing but a good chunk of the work was left in the hands of the artists. In the past, Marvel sold their books primarily on the strength of their art and it’s safe to say that back in the day, the artists ruled the roost.

    After the Image exodus, Marvel downplayed this (for several reasons one of which being that Image took a huge chunk of their market share and were the number 2 comic publisher) and when Quesada came in, he deliberately shifted focus to the writers and started bringing in guys from Vertigo and guys that had done prose without much comic book work. Hence guys like Bendis becoming the top guy at Marvel. So much so that Axel Alonso almost entirely downplayed the role of the artist (which was a very foolish position to take because comics are a visual medium).

    Since the Quesada takeover, I can’t think of a single new superstar artist that made the sort of impact the Image guys did. Even moderns day superstars like Capullo and Bennet came up in the 90s (Capullo drew Spawn for a very long time). Most of the comic artists that can sell books came from that era and or worked at Image. Funny thing is, the Image guys- particularly Jim Lee- can still move comics on the strength of their names alone. When Portacio and Silvestri came back to Marvel, they books they worked on were top sellers. But with the emphasis now so much on the writers, I’m not sure those days will ever come back again.
    I was going to make this point, so I'm glad you did. But also to expand.
    When the top artists left for Image, a lot of other artists flocked to Image as well. The most notable person I can think of is Stephen Platt. He was a rising star in Marvel, but jumped to Image because that was the "cool" thing to do. Had a few comics that he did and then vanished shortly after that, leaving the industry. I think a lot of artists did that. They jumped to Image without having any kind of recognition, Image was having difficulties paying artists (At least Homage was) and I'm not sure if Marvel or DC was welcoming them back. So I think there became this big gap of new artists. Image was bringing in the rising star artists, but couldn't give them the notary that came from being big in Marvel or DC.
    I think restorative nostalgia is the number one issue with comic book fans.
    A fine distinction between two types of Nostalgia:

    Reflective Nostalgia allows us to savor our memories but accepts that they are in the past
    Restorative Nostalgia pushes back against the here and now, keeping us stuck trying to relive our glory days.

  8. #23
    Incredible Member TriggerWarning's Avatar
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    The difference between good art and average art is minor whereas the difference between good writing and average writing is Watchmen vs a forgettable issue of any monthly book.

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