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  1. #1
    Astonishing Member Electricmastro's Avatar
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    Default Examples of politics and social issues being written well in comic books.

    A thread meant to emphasize on positivity, comics that deserve more attention than they get, and maybe even some constructive criticism in regards to politics and social issues and how writers write them in comics, whether old or new.

  2. #2
    Extraordinary Member PaulBullion's Avatar
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    I think the first 30 or so issues of Ms. Marvel by G. Willow Wilson were almost flawless. Engaging teenage drama rarely seen since Ditko Spider-Man, real life problems of religious and sexual minorities, goofy villains. The social issues (like gentrification, islamophobia, bullying) were always obvious but never cringy.
    "How does the Green Goblin have anything to do with Herpes?" - The Dying Detective

    Hillary was right!

  3. #3
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    Amazing Spider-Man # 105 is an underrated issue from the Stan Lee era. Randy Robertson organizes a protest against Jameson's racism and sensationalism. Jameson being the elitist he is gets offended by being called a racist, so he physically assaults Randy. Before it can be made to look like a fight started (which the police and the media would have blamed Randy for), Spider-Man swings down and hangs Jameson from a flagpole. Jameson gets turned into a joke and the protest doesn't get ruined.

    JMS' Spider-Man challenges stereotypes about teachers while addressing systemic issues with the education system. It also addresses the relationship between bullying and socioeconomic issues.

    The first Ms. Marvel story arc addresses ageism towards Millennials. A cult leader convinces a group of Millennials to let him turn them into batteries. They're convinced it's the only way they can contribute to society. The book also addresses how ingrained ageism is in our culture. For example, young people are the only group it is acceptable to label "lazy" and "parasites" without it being considered hate speech.

  4. #4

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    Green Lantern/Green Arrow by Dennis O'Neil and Neal Adams did a good job reflecting on social issues

  5. #5
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    People forget there's a lot of political satire in Dark Knight Returns. Liberals are the target of much of it, but Miller doesn't spare conservatives.

    Electra: Assassin is overlooked in general, it's highly experimental and that might have caught some fans off guard. There's some funny regarding a presidential race between a crazed Nixon-ish republican and a phony Kennedy democrat.

  6. #6
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    X-men: the thread. They've been a concept mired in race relation politics from the 60's and have only down more political. This has extended into metaphors about the LGBT community. Hickman's X-men examines isolationism, bigotry, corruption, pragmatism, ethno states, trauma and justice.

  7. #7
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    Jungle Action #19-24 the Panther vs The Klan arc. Don McGregor left Marvel before he could finish it ( it was eventually wrapped up by other creators a couple years later in Marvel Premiere). Obviously it had to do with racism both in the past and present, but it also touched on things like the recession and white liberalism.
    Last edited by ed2962; 05-19-2020 at 07:30 AM.

  8. #8
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    Ex Machina the whole series. It's about a retired superhero who becomes the mayor of post 9-11 New York. We get flashbacks to his superhero days while the present is him dealing with various issues related to big city politics.

  9. #9
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    American Flagg I'm going to recommend issues #1-27 in general but #1-12 of vol 1 more specifically. Set in the near future, Howard Chaykin's stories of an actor turned cop deconstructs the media, race, sex, domestic terrorism, immigration, and other topics with dark humor and a great visual design sense.

  10. #10
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    Alan Moore’s Watchmen. That book was years before it’s time.
    Marshall Law.
    Peter David’s Hulk run (particularly during the Professor Hulk era).
    Ms Marvel volume 1 by G.Willow Wilson was brilliant
    "Obviously not all conservatives are racists/bigots but all racists/bigots claim to be conservative"- Unknown

  11. #11
    CBR's Good Fairy Kieran_Frost's Avatar
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    The entire mutant metaphor for homosexuality always worked really well; and offered powerful commentary (Magik's death, the Legacy Virus). Iceman coming out (both times) was handled beautifully, and very respectfully. Warren Ellis' commentary on society in his Thunderbolts run was a scathing critique of the mass populous eating up branding.
    "We are Shakespeare. We are Michelangelo. We are Tchaikovsky. We are Turing. We are Mercury. We are Wilde. We are Lincoln, Lorca, Leonardo da Vinci. We are Alexander the Great. We are Fredrick the Great. We are Rustin. We are Addams. We are Marsha! Marsha Marsha Marsha! We so generous, we DeGeneres. We are Ziggy Stardust hooked to the silver screen. Controversially we are Malcolm X. We are Plato. We are Aristotle. We are RuPaul, god dammit! And yes, we are Woolf."

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