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  1. #1
    Amazing Member Matches's Avatar
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    Default Looking to buy this giant Batman comic run, not sure what to offer

    Could not find anywhere else to get help


    A guy at a ship has Batman 560-713. Issues appear real nice and he is selling. he said make me an offer and really not sure what to say. I mean a few of the comic runs in this lot are highly prized.


    I looked around online found a few similar that were 450-500

    What do you think, he needs money and really want to unload some stuff

  2. #2
    Mighty Member LordMikel's Avatar
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    That is 153 comics. At 2.99 each, that is 457.47 total. Not every one of the issues was a 2.99 cover price, but close enough.

    I'm not looking at every issue, but I do see that the Jim Lee run on Batman is here. In my opinion, when I worked at a comic store, comics with a preferred artist were high priced in the guide, but in low demand and difficult to sell.
    I see Bruce Wayne Murderer. No Man's Land.

    Odds are good, your local comic store bought these off of someone and got them fairly cheap. That would be a reason to group them altogether like this.

    So you could offer $400, which would be a great sale for the day. I doubt the store would go lower than that.
    You could offer $500. If you can afford it, are thinking $400 is too low, and really want to help your comic store. I think the value of buying them is still a good discount.

    $600. This is when you will need to start looking at, if I bought each issue, what would it cost me? Is $600 still a good price? Once you've done all of that work, then you can decide how high is truly worthwhile. Go to e-bay, look up each comic, do an excel spreadsheet and tally it up. You don't want to offer that much, in fact you don't want to offer within 20% of that price. So if it summed to $1000, then don't offer over $800.

    I hope this helps and is simply my own personal opinion.
    I think restorative nostalgia is the number one issue with comic book fans.
    A fine distinction between two types of Nostalgia:

    Reflective Nostalgia allows us to savor our memories but accepts that they are in the past
    Restorative Nostalgia pushes back against the here and now, keeping us stuck trying to relive our glory days.

  3. #3
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    My opinion, would be the true worth, would be if the lot deal includes the issues that has Harley Quinn, which would mostly be around the No Man's Land and Hush issues. One thing I've long learned, that based on Harley Quinn being in it alone, that issue would be worth quite a few times more than the non-Harley Quinn issues around it.

    Never hurts to ask dealer to inspect the lot if it includes the Harley Quinn issues - which according to Comic Vine, Batman #570, #573 - 574, #613 - 614, and the semi-prose story of #663.
    Last edited by ngroove; 05-22-2020 at 06:03 PM.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by LordMikel View Post
    That is 153 comics. At 2.99 each, that is 457.47 total. Not every one of the issues was a 2.99 cover price, but close enough.

    I'm not looking at every issue, but I do see that the Jim Lee run on Batman is here. In my opinion, when I worked at a comic store, comics with a preferred artist were high priced in the guide, but in low demand and difficult to sell.
    I see Bruce Wayne Murderer. No Man's Land.

    Odds are good, your local comic store bought these off of someone and got them fairly cheap. That would be a reason to group them altogether like this.

    So you could offer $400, which would be a great sale for the day. I doubt the store would go lower than that.
    You could offer $500. If you can afford it, are thinking $400 is too low, and really want to help your comic store. I think the value of buying them is still a good discount.

    $600. This is when you will need to start looking at, if I bought each issue, what would it cost me? Is $600 still a good price? Once you've done all of that work, then you can decide how high is truly worthwhile. Go to e-bay, look up each comic, do an excel spreadsheet and tally it up. You don't want to offer that much, in fact you don't want to offer within 20% of that price. So if it summed to $1000, then don't offer over $800.

    I hope this helps and is simply my own personal opinion.
    Many modern era comics, from an age when the big companies flooded and inflated them in prints, today could be commonly found in dollar bins, rather than $2.99.

    The only exceptions, the "prized issues", would probably only be Hush, for the Jim Lee illustrations, and Harley Quinn issues.

    Everything else, common dollar bin fillers.
    Last edited by ngroove; 05-22-2020 at 05:57 PM.

  5. #5
    Astonishing Member Nick Miller's Avatar
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    Why would you pay cover price? I assume these are used?

    And OP, who exactly is selling these? The retailer or some guy you know?

    Offer 150. And negotiate from there.

  6. #6
    Astonishing Member OBrianTallent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Miller View Post
    Why would you pay cover price? I assume these are used?

    And OP, who exactly is selling these? The retailer or some guy you know?

    Offer 150. And negotiate from there.
    Having seen a lot of those issues at a local used book store, not a comic shop, for prices between fifty cents to 2.95, I was going to suggest an offer of $200, but yeah 150 might be a good place to start.

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