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  1. #1
    Mighty Member babyblob's Avatar
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    Default Do we need a new age for comics?

    I ask this because the Modern Age has been going on for 30+ years. Should we start a new age of comics with a new age? Or rename the comic age from the late 80s to like the 2010s? Just a thought because havign 80s comics called modern age seems goofy. I dont know what you would call current issues. But with the start of 2020 come and gone i thought that would have been a good time for a new age.
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  2. #2
    Invincible Jersey Girl Tami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyblob View Post
    I ask this because the Modern Age has been going on for 30+ years. Should we start a new age of comics with a new age? Or rename the comic age from the late 80s to like the 2010s? Just a thought because havign 80s comics called modern age seems goofy. I dont know what you would call current issues. But with the start of 2020 come and gone i thought that would have been a good time for a new age.
    The Post-Modern Age?
    Original join date: 11/23/2004
    Eclectic Connoisseur of all things written, drawn or imaginatively created.

  3. #3
    Astonishing Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Are we in the Digital Age of Comics?

    The advent of the internet has changed the ways comics are created, bought, sold, discussed.

  4. #4
    Mighty Member C_Miller's Avatar
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    I think the ages stopped after the Bronze Age. After 1985, decades are far more relevant than trying to create clever names to group eras into.

    Also, you never create a name for an era in the time that it's happening. That stuff is left to people looking backwards.

  5. #5
    Astonishing Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Says who???

  6. #6
    Extraordinary Member Phoenixx9's Avatar
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    Age of Corona?

    Post Apocalyptic Corona?

    Post Corona Era?

  7. #7
    Boisterously Confused
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    Quote Originally Posted by C_Miller View Post
    I think the ages stopped after the Bronze Age. After 1985, decades are far more relevant than trying to create clever names to group eras into.

    Also, you never create a name for an era in the time that it's happening. That stuff is left to people looking backwards.
    Yeah, think C_Miller is talkin' The Tea here.

  8. #8
    Mighty Member babyblob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riv86672 View Post
    Are we in the Digital Age of Comics?

    The advent of the internet has changed the ways comics are created, bought, sold, discussed.
    I really like Digital Age.
    Favorite teams. Alpha Flight, Avengers, Fantastic Four, West Coast Avengers, Justice Society of America, Legion of Superheroes.

  9. #9
    Astonishing Member mathew101281's Avatar
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    golden age
    1938 to 1955
    Silver age
    1956 1970
    Bronze age
    1970-1985
    The Grim and Gritty era
    1985-1994
    The Reconstruction age
    1995-2010
    The mass media age
    2010-2019

    Golden Age
    the creation of Superman and the solidification of superhero archetypes. includes the WW2 era and declines with the publishing of Seduction of the Innocent.

    Silver Age
    The rebirth of the superhero genre. Starts with the recreation of the Flash includes the creation of Marvel and ends when Kirby leaves Marvel.

    Bronze Age
    Characterized by the maturing of comics as a whole, and the growth of other genres outside of superheroes. Also characterized by the diversification of kinds of superheroes being created. Starts with the creation of more socially relevant comics Like Green Arrow/Green Lantern and the Spiderman drug issue and ends with Crisis on infinite Earths.

    The Grim and gritty age.
    Characterized by superheroes taking a darker more serious tone, and the deconstruction of many of the genre conventions. begins with Watchman and Dark Knight Returns ends with ends with the mid 90's decline of Marvel and the aftermath of the Death of Superman gimmick. Includes the rise of Image and other indie publishers.

    The Reconstruction age
    Characterized by the return of silver and bronze age sensibilities to mainstream comics. It starts with the publication of Alex Ross classics like Marvels and Kingdom Come. Includes things like Geoff John's JSA run, and Green Lantern Rebirth. ends somewhere between 2008 and 2010. It also sees the rise of manga as a major alternative to American comics. Hollywood starts to make superhero movies that are actually liked by fans and non-fans alike.

    The mass Media age
    Superheroes become the dominant driver of pop culture. This pretty much co insides with Marvel's dominance in Hollywood. I think it might just have ended with Endgame, but we are to close to the event to know for sure.

  10. #10
    Mighty Member jb681131's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by babyblob View Post
    I ask this because the Modern Age has been going on for 30+ years. Should we start a new age of comics with a new age? Or rename the comic age from the late 80s to like the 2010s? Just a thought because havign 80s comics called modern age seems goofy. I dont know what you would call current issues. But with the start of 2020 come and gone i thought that would have been a good time for a new age.
    Well DC has sayd officially that from 198-2011 it's the Crisis age and from 2011-on it's the Flashpoint age.

    For a new age to exist amoung all companies, there should be some important change or event in publications, which hasn't been the cas since a long long time.

  11. #11
    Mighty Member jb681131's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mathew101281 View Post
    golden age
    1938 to 1955
    Silver age
    1956 1970
    Bronze age
    1970-1985
    The Grim and Gritty era
    1985-1994
    The Reconstruction age
    1995-2010
    The mass media age
    2010-2019
    There are more ages than that if you want to be complete !

    1500-1650 - Pioneer age
    1650-1800 - Victorian age
    1800-1938 - Platinum age
    1938-1950 - Golden age
    1950-1970 - Silver age
    1970-1986 - Bronze age (aka Silver age 2)
    1986-1992 - Iron age (aka Copper age, aka Dark age)
    1992-1998 - Baroque age (aka Image age)
    1998-2004 - Dynamique age (aka Millenium age)
    2000-Now - New age (aka Diamond age)

  12. #12
    Boisterously Confused
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    Thing about categorizing these eras of comics is that fans will get dialed in on the trends that they can see, like tone or maturity of content across multiple titles. Sometimes, the change comes in places that aren't as easy to see, or at least, not as easy to connect to the published content.

    Example: there was an extensive discussion on another thread about when exactly the Bronze Age began. It wasn't like the Golden/Silver Age boundary, where you had very clear changes in what was getting published. Opinions ranged from the late 1960s through the early 1970s. The answer I found that I preferred revolved around DC making major changes to its creative and editorial staff about 1968; that impacted not only what got written at DC, and how, but it changed the talent available to Marvel at the time. Symptoms of that included a move away from unquestioning US Nationalistic forms of patriotism, and early experiments with diversity and broadening the range of the superhero genre.

    A likely point to look for an age change might be 2011; Marvel's Cinematic Universe had not only proven that there were more than 3 comics characters in existence that could found and maintain a franchise, but that entire cinematic comic Pan-Franchise offerings (Panchises?) were possible, and incredibly lucrative. That was also the year that Disney, who had purchased Marvel in 2009, took control of Marvel Studios' marketing. That changed the importance WB attached to DC's IP, and the way that players like Sony began looking at superhero IP they held. All of that was bound to have impact on the comics. A lot of that, we couldn't see; oh, these forums were alive with discussion of what that kind of change Disney's moves might represent, but we couldn't be sure at the time.

    Contrast that with something else that might look like an inflection point to fans: Dan Didio's removal as DC's publisher. That is certainly having an influence on what DC publishes, but is it enough to move the whole industry? Doesn't seem likely, but it's too early to say.
    Last edited by DrNewGod; 06-01-2020 at 07:59 AM.

  13. #13
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
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    I think a key part here is to look not at creative stuff, but the publishing side as well. The rise of the direct market should definitely be part of discussing these ages, and so should the process we're going through right now, as the direct market loses its dominance.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  14. #14
    Invincible Member Digifiend's Avatar
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    How about 1985-1997, Dark Age, 1997-2019, Diamond Age (after Diamond Comic Distributors) and 2020 onwards, Digital Age?

    To clarify, the late 80s is often called the Dark Age, because comics got darker and edgier at this time. It's also when comics started vanishing from newsstands in the US. 1997 I picked as the end point as that's when Heroes Reborn happened, and around when Marvel nearly went bust. This led to the Diamond distribution monopoly, triggering a new era. The Coronavirus crisis has seen a lot of books go digital exclusive and Diamond's monopoly ended, so that's another new era.
    Last edited by Digifiend; 06-01-2020 at 10:14 AM.
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  15. #15
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
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    I would say that the mid 80s to the 90s are probably the dark age. One guy wrote a book about it.
    http://markvoger.com/the-dark-age-gr...ws-publishing/

    The phrase dark age can have dual meanings. Superhero comics started out often darker than what fans had been used to, so it fit in that way. In the space of little over an year in the Spider-Man comics, a long-standing character was killed in Berlin when his neck was slit, Spider-Man was tricked into killing an ex-girlfriend of Wolverine’s in a suicide by a cop style arrangement, he was buried alive by a villain who would go on to commit suicide, he found himself institutionalized, he learned that he had crippled a former enemy, and encountered a bigger nastier doppelganger. The reputation of comics at the time, as Marvel tried to ape the surface elements of successful books by artists turned writers gets to the other definition of dark age, “a period of intellectual darkness and barbarity.”

    The 21st century kicked off the cinematic age, with more writing for the trade, an abandonment of narrative exposition, an emphasis on writers, and an increase in quality of printing, especially color, which has allowed for more precise art.

    It will take some time to recognize a new era. The monicker the Silver Age was coined in a fan letter in 1966. We may very well be in a new age, exemplified by digital comics, an emphasis on diversity, and growing nicheification.
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

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