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  1. #16
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    1990s = Age of Excess

  2. #17
    Loony Scott Taylor's Avatar
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    Personally I'd simplify things more into how comics were distributed.

    First Age - Distribution was supermarkets, dime stores, drug stores, you name it.
    Second Age - Direct market.
    Third Age - Graphic Novel market. All or most comics are being written to be sold as GNs
    Fourth Age - Digital being embraced rather than floppies. We have a ways to go, I think, before we get there
    Every day is a gift, not a given right.

  3. #18
    Ultimate Member Gray Lensman's Avatar
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    I want to call what DC is only just starting to move away from - the removal of as many legacy characters as possible and the return of the Silver Age versions to prominence - the Mercury Age. It looks like silver at a glance, but it's really, really toxic.
    "Theory: The Phoenix doesn't corrupt the characters, it corrupts the authors." Gambit, King of Thieves

  4. #19
    Boisterously Confused
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    Many submissions I see here are about "what I read" with no thought about "why it happened."

  5. #20
    Mighty Member jb681131's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNewGod View Post
    Many submissions I see here are about "what I read" with no thought about "why it happened."
    !? No.

    The Plantinum/Gold/Silver/Bronze/modern ages are all ages based on the real why reason !
    Pre-wartime, wartime, comics code time, lighter comics code, no more comics code !

    Then the modern age had no real very distinguishable reasons why it evolved like it did.
    So the reasons are eras are more defiened on the "what I read".

  6. #21
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jb681131 View Post
    The Plantinum/Gold/Silver/Bronze/modern ages are all ages based on the real why reason !
    Pre-wartime, wartime, comics code time, lighter comics code, no more comics code !

    Then the modern age had no real very distinguishable reasons why it evolved like it did.
    So the reasons are eras are more defiened on the "what I read".
    You forget distribution. Seen in that light, the Platinum age was the age of comics being syndicated in newspaper distribution, and the Golden Age was the rise of the floppies. The rise of the direct market and the collapse of the newsstand distribution ought to fit into one age as well, as does the rise of the digital market and the trade market.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  7. #22
    Mighty Member jb681131's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjn View Post
    You forget distribution. Seen in that light, the Platinum age was the age of comics being syndicated in newspaper distribution, and the Golden Age was the rise of the floppies. The rise of the direct market and the collapse of the newsstand distribution ought to fit into one age as well, as does the rise of the digital market and the trade market.
    Maybe, but that not why those ages appeared.
    Now we can see that comics are a lot digital, but it doesn't make a new age in style/content.

  8. #23
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jb681131 View Post
    Maybe, but that not why those ages appeared.
    Now we can see that comics are a lot digital, but it doesn't make a new age in style/content.
    Not necessarily, but they are a huge outside factor that govern what type of readers you get, what type of visibility you have from "mainstream" society, and what storytelling formats to use. A shift in distribution is likely to mean that publishers are in great need of new creators who can understand and work with the constraints of the new distribution format as well, as not all of the established creators will be able to make the leap.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  9. #24
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    1990s - mid-2000s: age of speculators
    since then: age of burst bubbles

  10. #25
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    The transition from one age to another isn't visible until years or decades after it happens. If you'd asked me in 1978, I would have said that we were still in the Silver Age. Nobody used the term Bronze Age until much later.
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    The new home of the pre-2014 CBR Classic Comics Forum community: http://classiccomics.org

  11. #26
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    2010 - present
    The movie age

  12. #27
    MXAAGVNIEETRO IS RIGHT MyriVerse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by C_Miller View Post
    I think the ages stopped after the Bronze Age. After 1985, decades are far more relevant than trying to create clever names to group eras into.

    Also, you never create a name for an era in the time that it's happening. That stuff is left to people looking backwards.
    Dark, Iron, and Modern have been used quite a bit.

    I think from 1999, onward, there should be a big reference to the Hollywood-ization of comics, but I don't know what.

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Allen View Post
    The transition from one age to another isn't visible until years or decades after it happens. If you'd asked me in 1978, I would have said that we were still in the Silver Age. Nobody used the term Bronze Age until much later.
    Yeah. For instance, "Golden Age" wasn't used until 1960, and it took several more years before we figured out what to call the Silver Age.
    Last edited by MyriVerse; 06-03-2020 at 01:14 PM.
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  13. #28
    Boisterously Confused
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyriVerse View Post
    ...I think from 1999, onward, there should be a big reference to the Hollywood-ization of comics, but I don't know what...
    I see that in two stages. The first being in (as you say) 1999, when both X-Men and Spider-Man were in development or post-production. The second I think comes in 2011, when Disney took over Marvel's marketing.

  14. #29
    MXAAGVNIEETRO IS RIGHT MyriVerse's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNewGod View Post
    I see that in two stages. The first being in (as you say) 1999, when both X-Men and Spider-Man were in development or post-production. The second I think comes in 2011, when Disney took over Marvel's marketing.
    I was thinking mainly about how comics were done in a more cinematic style (maybe starting with Ellis, but I'm not sure who should be credit for starting it), not necessarily superhero movies.
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  15. #30
    Boisterously Confused
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyriVerse View Post
    I was thinking mainly about how comics were done in a more cinematic style (maybe starting with Ellis, but I'm not sure who should be credit for starting it), not necessarily superhero movies.
    Ah. I noticed that. I'm not sure when it started, somewhere in the late 1990s? Early 2000?

    It was one of the things that turned me off. I had to wonder if some artists were auditioning for storyboard work.

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