View Poll Results: How much should it matter?

Voters
12. You may not vote on this poll
  • A lot

    0 0%
  • it's an important element

    1 8.33%
  • not much

    3 25.00%
  • eehhhh it depends

    8 66.67%
Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Uncanny King-Kamalu lemonpeace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Brooklyn's WiFi
    Posts
    2,491

    Default How much should meta reading matter?

    simple enough, I've noticed that there is a dissonance between how fans read comics nowadays more so than other mediums. Fans seem to place a higher premium on the meta of the stories, what are the motives, politics, or "agenda" going into the story beats and how it affirms or does a disservice to the conventions of comic book storytelling. my question is how much should that stuff matter, and why?
    SIGNAL/Duke Thomas is the Midnight Sun of Gotham

    "power does not corrupt, power always reveals."

    Martin to Malcolm: militant Professor X is kinda the wave right now

    DC: Batman & The Outsiders, Teen Titans, Suicide Squad, The Flash, Justice League Odyssey, Far Sector, Red Hood/Outlaws

    Marvel: Immortal Hulk, Miles Morales: Spiderman, Black Panther, X-Men (2019), Venom, X-Force, Hellions, Giant Sized X-Men

    Anticipated titles: anything from Milestone*, X of Swords

  2. #2
    Boisterously Confused
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    5,802

    Default

    Sometimes, you just want to see a good guy punch a bad guy. Sometimes, it can be really engaging to see you a story go beyond that. It depends (for me, at least) on how well it's done.

  3. #3
    Astonishing Member Restingvoice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    4,732

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lemonpeace View Post
    simple enough, I've noticed that there is a dissonance between how fans read comics nowadays more so than other mediums. Fans seem to place a higher premium on the meta of the stories, what are the motives, politics, or "agenda" going into the story beats and how it affirms or does a disservice to the conventions of comic book storytelling. my question is how much should that stuff matter, and why?
    Well... it matters more in comics today because of what happens in meta directly affects the story inside. Just from what happened recently, there's Mxy fixing New 52 Superman and Lois to be classic Superman and Lois, the whole Doomsday Clock, or any attempt they make to fix the story within the story. Right now it's already built in the narrative.

    I don't like it when they use it to fix the story. I want the fixing to happen outside the story, not inside, because one, it took me out of the story, and two, it confirms that they have no intention to change and will write whatever they want with no concern of continuity, consistency, logic or empathy towards readers because they can always call Mxy or Greek Gods to fix it.

    Jokes are fine.

    It's also cool when they use it to speak about the medium, like how in Morrison's Action Comics, Superman thinks of their world as a paper while there's an enemy in a higher dimension stabbing the paper with a fork. That's a cool shout out to the medium, but the enemy's also still inside the story. Most importantly they don't use this story to cover their mistakes.

    Oh, wait you're asking about reading. It matters to me only if I know what you're doing with this story and I see what you're trying to say is affecting the way the story is told, good or bad. If there's no reason for it then I won't read it as meta.
    Last edited by Restingvoice; 06-01-2020 at 06:02 PM.

  4. #4

    Default

    I think it is an important element because audiences nowadays are trained to see the metatextual meaning within art.

    Because comics have become part of the dominant culture it matters even more-so as it frames a lot of the cultural values that are espoused by society.

    Back in the day it did not matter as much because comics spoke to only a small minority of people and as time went on the meta began to matter because the stories were no longer relevant to the growing diverse reading population.

    This is why comics that only focus on superhero daring-do are mostly seen as pedestrian or juvenile because that's an outmoded way to look at superhero comics.

    That's not to say that comics should only focus on the meta there needs to be a fine balance. For example, Civil War came out in the shadows of 9/11 and the argument over security vs freedom; which at the time really spoke to the ethos that the country was feeling and it was a massive hit. You can read it as a superhero fisticuffs or a story about the growing unease Americans felt with government overreach. Then you other examples that veer off too much like the ill-fated New Warriors which only focused on the meta.

    Now DC has a really bad habit on using meta to address their editorial issues and reboots and at this point it is hackneyed and trite.

    Snyder tried bringing back DC's flagships to their superhero ethos but he ends up falling flat because it is completely devoid of metatextual meaning. Think about the myriad of "epic" arcs that New 52 Batman had that didn't really matter or his Justice League or Metal event; they feel childish.

    Writer's need a deft hand at incorporating or not incorporating meta into their stories for DC I think John's Green Lantern is probably the best example, but his Doomsday Clock not so much.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •