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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by From The Shadows View Post
    James Cameron was set to direct both the X-Men and Spider-Man films way back in the 90s. It was stuck in some legal mess for years. And it fell through. This is ironic since his recent comments about Marvel films. I know this because it was in a lot of the comics I read back then.It was in the Stan Lee section if I remember.
    Cameron's Spider-man was wild. He merged Electro and Kingpin into "Carlton Strand" - a parody of corrupt capitalists. Sandman was in it, called Boyd, who got his powers from Philadelphia Experiment type thing which mixed his atoms. He would revel his identity to MJ, and they'd have sex on the Brooklyn Bride. It also had lots of swearing in it.

    Joss Whedon wrote a draft of X-men, the Brotherhood captured Wolverine for their machine in the Statue of Liberty - this went to Rogue when they filmed it.

    The original Wolverine they hired for X-men was Dougray Scott. He got injured filming a stunt on Mission: Impossible 2 so they hired Hugh Jackman and the rest is history.

  2. #32
    Astonishing Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirby101 View Post
    The original actors they wanted for Walter White in Breaking Bad were Mathew Broderick or John Cusack.
    Im a huge Cusack fan, so Id have prob. watched the show if theyd cast him.

  3. #33
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    The holiest of holies in Canada, STRANGE BREW, was co-written by Steve De Jarnatt, with Bob & Doug, in 1983. He had already written his script for THE MIRACLE MILE--which was judged one of the ten best unproduced screenplays at the time. Studios wanted to produce THE MIRACLE MILE but De Jarnatt wouldn't let them if he couldn't direct. He used the money he made from STRANGE BREW to finance making MIRACLE MILE himself.
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  4. #34
    Ultimate Member Kirby101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riv86672 View Post
    I’m a huge Cusack fan, so I’d have prob. watched the show if they’d cast him.
    You should still watch it. Cranston is nothing short of spectacular. He deserved all those Emmys.
    There came a time when the Old Gods died! The Brave died with the Cunning! The Noble perished locked in battle with unleashed Evil! It was the last day for them! An ancient era was passing in fiery holocaust!

  5. #35
    Extraordinary Member Jackalope89's Avatar
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    Jumping into the animated realm...
    The reason why Super Saiyan in Dragon Ball Z had blonde hair, was that in the manga, the hair wasn't colored in. It was Toriyama giving his assistant a break with all that (time consuming process to fill in the hair).

    As for the "False Super Saiyan" of DBZ Lord Slug, it was given the red glow because at the time, the colorists didn't know what Toriyama had planned for the actual transformation in the manga and anime.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirby101 View Post
    The original actors they wanted for Walter White in Breaking Bad were Mathew Broderick or John Cusack.
    Either probably could have done it, but I suspect it would have had a very different feel.

  7. #37
    Mighty Member 90'sCartoonMan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cyke View Post
    So this is weird in that I don't love any of the movies that I'm going to mention, but Better Luck Tomorrow predates the Fast and the Furious franchise, and indeed it was a small, indie, character driven drama. Except it introduced the character of Han, as a high schooler, played by Sung Hang. Years later, the Fast and the Furious franchise emerges and then Tokyo Drift, where Han reappears. At first there's no real thought to the connection -- it's just the same actor playing a character with coincidentally the same name at the surface. But Justin Lin directed Better Luck Tomorrow (that's how he got his big break), and when he became director for the franchise, he brought the character back, essentially making Better Luck Tomorrow as Han's origin film, or more appropriately, the Fast and the Furious absorbed the movie, retroactively making the older film canon.

    I can't think of many other examples of that happening with a franchise, but it'd be like finding out that Lost in Translation (2003) was a part of the MCU (2008) because Charlotte was actually Natasha, who debuted later in the franchise, in an undercover assignment.
    That is pretty crazy. I can think of some examples of characters appearing on one show and being carried over to another seemingly non-related one (like Mike from 30 Rock getting a much larger role on Kimmy Schmidt), but nothing to that extent.

    Quote Originally Posted by Riv86672 View Post
    Just found this one out.

    Desmond Llewelyn Has two records. He’s played the same character (Q) in the most movies, 17.
    And he’s played the same character (Q) the longest at 36 years.

    It started w. From Russia With Love (1963) and lasted till The World Is Not Enough (1999).
    What are the terms for that second record? Leonard Nimoy first played Spock in 1966, and his final performance was in 2013. So while there was a huge gap where he didn't play Spock at all, that's 47 years of playing the same character.

  8. #38
    Astonishing Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 90'sCartoonMan View Post
    What are the terms for that second record? Leonard Nimoy first played Spock in 1966, and his final performance was in 2013. So while there was a huge gap where he didn't play Spock at all, that's 47 years of playing the same character.
    Beats me; i didnt make that up, i just read it, thought it was cool, and shared it.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by 90'sCartoonMan View Post
    What are the terms for that second record? Leonard Nimoy first played Spock in 1966, and his final performance was in 2013. So while there was a huge gap where he didn't play Spock at all, that's 47 years of playing the same character.
    Helen Wagner played Nancy Hughes for 54 years on As The World Turns. The show debuted in 1956 and her character said the first words on the show. She was still playing the character in its final year of 2010. Unfortunately, she died before the final episode but she made several appearances in 2010 before she died.

  10. #40
    Astonishing Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    I’m watching SEINFELD right now. (s5 ep9 1993). Elaine’s dating a guy named Joel Rifkin; he has the same name as a serial killer who’d just recently been caught irl. She started suggesting he change his name, and looking at the sports section in the paper said Dion was pretty good, but the guy didn’t like it.
    Her next suggestion? O.J.

  11. #41
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    Ken Barlow (William Roache) has been on CORONATION STREET since it began in 1960. This is a pretty well known fact, so not something I'd consider trivia--I'm almost embarrassed to post it here, because it's so obvious. He's had to leave the show for extended periods--not of his own choosing--but he's always come back. Since Corrie has returned to filming, we haven't seen Ken--or any of the elderly actors, for their own safety--but here's hoping he'll return to the cobbles when it's safe to do so.
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  12. #42
    Astonishing Member ChrisIII's Avatar
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    Cranston also I think sort of had an 'everyman' kind of look to him as well. Apart from Malcolm in the middle and the Seinfeld dentist he was also a commercial pitchman for practically everything before he became big.
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  13. #43
    Astonishing Member ChrisIII's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNewGod View Post
    That one's interesting. Flemming's books featured an armorer named Major Boothroyde (sp?), who made a brief appearance in the film adaptation of Dr. No. Q turned up later and was purely a cinema creation. Anybody know why the films made the switch?
    According to Spy Who Loved Me, Boothryd and Q are the same character (Anya refers to him as "Major Boothryd"), although the one in Dr.No is obviously a different actor. So basically it's the film's first recasting of a supporting role, although not confirmed until later.


    The films were largely more focused on the gadgets while the novels didn't really bother that much apart from some practical stuff. Hence the need for a gadget character.
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  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisIII View Post
    According to Spy Who Loved Me, Boothryd and Q are the same character (Anya refers to him as "Major Boothryd"), although the one in Dr.No is obviously a different actor. So basically it's the film's first recasting of a supporting role, although not confirmed until later.


    The films were largely more focused on the gadgets while the novels didn't really bother that much apart from some practical stuff. Hence the need for a gadget character.
    I get that, I was just curious why they went from his literary name to the code name.

  15. #45
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    Everybody Loves Raymond - Ray Romano wanted the show to be about friends hanging out in a coffee shop talking about funny world events. Showrunner Phil Rosenthal reminded him that Seinfeld kind of already did that. It was Rosenthal who suggested the show be more about Ray's family. Romano actually had a brother who was a cop and was jealous of Ray's success. The other characters were based loosely on Rosenthal's family members.

    The season six episode "The Angry Family" in which Ray's son Michael writes a story about an angry family who is always yelling at each other and reads it aloud at school is based on something similar that Rosenthal's son Ben actually wrote in school about a mother and father who are always yelling.
    Last edited by caj; 09-23-2020 at 09:10 AM.

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