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  1. #1
    Boisterously Confused
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    Default Cool (at least, to you) Trivia About TV Shows Or Films You Love

    Easier to show than to tell you.

    Perry Mason (1957-1966): The show had a reputation among writers as The Hardest Gig In Hollywood. After being infuriated by studios' treatment of his attorney/detective in 1940s B films, Earl Stanley Gardener wouldn't give up his creation to TV until he had a rock solid contract that guaranteed him script-approval. Every polished script was only a penultimate draft. It next had to endure Gardener's withering scrutiny to ensure accuracy of legal procedure. He frequently ripped the guts out of scripts whose plots depended on things that would not work in a court.

    Was it 100% real-life? Nah. Was it as close as it could get? Probably.

  2. #2
    Mighty Member TriggerWarning's Avatar
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    Battlestar Galactica is in large part directly lifted from the book of Mormon. The creator, Glen Larson, was a devout mormon and lifted names, symbology, and ideas straight from the Book of Mormon. As such even the remake has mormon ties since the names and ideas didn't change, just the execution of such.

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    Astonishing Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    I heard the first home computer on a TV show belonged The Addams Family.

    Chandler was the only male FRIENDS uh, friend, who never dated a black woman.
    Ross and Joey both dated Aisha Tyler, and both dated Gabrielle Union.

    Buffy The Vampire Slayer was the first TV show to use the word Google as a verb.
    Last edited by Riv86672; 08-04-2020 at 06:38 PM.

  4. #4
    Mighty Member Gaius's Avatar
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    More retroactive trivia but Jurassic Park III portrayed Spinosaurus as able to swim underwater years before it was believed to have been either a semi-aquatic or aquatic Dinosaur.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TriggerWarning View Post
    Battlestar Galactica is in large part directly lifted from the book of Mormon. The creator, Glen Larson, was a devout mormon and lifted names, symbology, and ideas straight from the Book of Mormon. As such even the remake has mormon ties since the names and ideas didn't change, just the execution of such.
    Huh. I thought it came out of Chariots Of The Gods/Ancient Astronauts stuff. Not disputing, merely seeking clarity.
    Last edited by DrNewGod; 08-04-2020 at 08:09 PM.

  6. #6
    A Wearied Madness Vakanai's Avatar
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    Christopher Lee is the only actor to play both Sherlock Holmes and his brother Mycroft, albeit in different films.

    Peter Cushing is the only actor to play Sherlock Holmes in two different versions of The Hound of the Baskervilles, first in film and once on television.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vakanai View Post
    Christopher Lee is the only actor to play both Sherlock Holmes and his brother Mycroft, albeit in different films.

    Peter Cushing is the only actor to play Sherlock Holmes in two different versions of The Hound of the Baskervilles, first in film and once on television.
    Neat! 10 char

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riv86672 View Post
    I heard the first home computer on a TV show belonged The Addams Family.

    Chandler was the only male FRIENDS uh, friend, who never dated a black woman.
    Ross and Joey both dated Aisha Tyler, and both dated Gabrielle Union.

    Buffy The Vampire Slayer was the first TV show to use the word Google as a verb.
    The Google thing surprises me.

  9. #9

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    1930s actor Buster Crabbe probably played the most amount of heroic roles from comic books, comic strips, and pulps:

    - Tarzan
    - Flash Gordon
    - Buck Rogers
    - Red Barry
    - Thun'da (a short-lived Frank Frazetta comic book character)
    - plus a somewhat heroic version of Billy the Kid/Billy Carson in 42 B-Westerns

  10. #10
    Put a smile on that face Immortal Weapon's Avatar
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    OJ Simpson was the original choice for the T-800 in Terminator. James Cameron rejected his casting saying he didn't have the look of a ruthless killer.

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    DALLAS - Bobby Ewing was supposed to die during the 5-part mini-series that introduced the series. The actual series was supposed to center on Pamela Barnes Ewing inheriting Bobby's stake in Ewing Oil and battling the Ewing family. The producers fell in love with actor Patrick Duffy and decided to change the format to make it brother vs brother. Duffy wanted to leave the series after the 5th full year (dvd season 6) but was persuaded to stay on for an additional two years more. Finally, Duffy was ready to leave and insisted that Bobby not die in a fireball airplane explosion or anything where he could come back as another actor. He wanted Bobby to die onscreen. Since the show had already bombed with trying to replace Miss Ellie with another actress, they agreed that Bobby should die with no way to bring him back. Two years later, Duffy decided to come back but only if he could play Bobby and not another character. Thus, Pam woke up from her dream of Bobby dying and the entire previous season was wiped out.

  12. #12
    Mighty Member TriggerWarning's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNewGod View Post
    Huh. I thought it came out of Chariots Of The Gods/Ancient Astronauts stuff. Not disputing, merely seeking clarity.
    https://www.deseret.com/2014/11/22/2...thing-profound

    Glen Larson, himself a Latter-day Saint, had infused his series mythology with too many Mormon references to ignore. His Twelve Colonies of Man were essentially the Lost Tribes of Israel whose history began at Kobol, an obvious anagram for Kolob, which, in Mormon theology, is the star nearest to the throne of God. The colonies were led by a "Quorum of 12," and marriages were referred to as “sealings” that extended beyond mortality and “through all the eternities.” The show never shied away from religious themes, and, at one point, the characters encounter a group of angels who paraphrase LDS Church President Lorenzo Snow.

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    THE GOLDEN GIRLS Was supposed to center on Dorothy, Blanche, Rose, and a gay cook named Coco. The character of Sophia was only supposed to show up occasionally. She would live in a retirement home and show up to visit every once in awhile. Estelle Getty blew the NBC brass away and the decision was made to keep Sophia full time and get rid of the gay cook. Rue McClanahan was hired to play Rose, a dim-witted character similar to other roles Rue had played. Betty White was supposed to play Blanche, and play her similar to Sue Ann Nivens, who she had played on Mary Tyler Moore. Jay Sandrich suggested that the ladies switch roles and it worked out perfectly for both actresses. Bea Arthur had initially not been interested in doing a show where 'Maude and Vivian meet Sue Ann Nivens'. But when Rue called her and told her that she and Betty had switched roles, she changed her mind and agreed to do the show.

    Thank goodness it worked out the way it did. The show was brilliantly funny.

  14. #14
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    The 1945 musical, STATE FAIR--starring Jeanne Crain, Dana Andrews, Dick Haymes and Vivian Blain--is the only musical written by Rodgers and Hammerstein directly for film and not as a stage production. It's based on a 1933 non-musical film by the same name, itself based on a novel.

    When the movie was remade in 1962--starring Pat Boone, Bobby Darin and Ann-Margret--Oscar Hammerstein had died and Richard Rodgers wrote both music and lyrics for songs added to the remake.

    One of my music teachers in school must have been a fan, because I remember learning songs from the movie--especially "It's a Grand Night for Singing" and "It Might as Well Be Spring."
    “A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds, adored by little statesmen and philosophers and divines."
    —Ralph Waldo Emerson

    🇨🇦

  15. #15
    Astonishing Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrNewGod View Post
    The Google thing surprises me.
    ^^^me too!
    I mean, it hadda happen somewhere I guess.

    Quote Originally Posted by Comic-Reader Lad View Post
    1930s actor Buster Crabbe probably played the most amount of heroic roles from comic books, comic strips, and pulps:

    - Tarzan
    - Flash Gordon
    - Buck Rogers
    - Red Barry
    - Thun'da (a short-lived Frank Frazetta comic book character)
    - plus a somewhat heroic version of Billy the Kid/Billy Carson in 42 B-Westerns
    ^^^thats a great body of work!

    I’d never heard of Thun’da, and Googled him just now. I guess Dynamite has or had the rights to him. He’s made some modern appearances!

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