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  1. #1
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    Default How Important Is Fidelity To The Myths?

    I've complained about Hades being used as a villain and I'm fine if Ares isn't a villain in future stories. Then again, I'd be lying if I said I also had no problem with the Amazons not being evil misandrists. So how important is fidelity to the myths? How far can we take artistic license?

  2. #2
    Extraordinary Member Vordan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Z View Post
    I've complained about Hades being used as a villain and I'm fine if Ares isn't a villain in future stories. Then again, I'd be lying if I said I also had no problem with the Amazons not being evil misandrists. So how important is fidelity to the myths? How far can we take artistic license?
    So you want them to be evil misandrists? (I’m assuming you mean to say you’d be lying if you said you had no problem with them being evil misandrists).

    Fidelity doesn’t matter at all. Marston was actually all about subverting the myths, with the Amazons being portrayed as highly advanced peace loving philosopher warriors rather than barbaric backwards warrior women. So it’s fine if the way the Greek myths work in the DCU don’t match up with how the “real” myths work. The Norse mythos over at Marvel likewise aren’t very accurate to the “real” myths. Loki is Odin’s blood brother not Thor’s. Thor is married and has two sons in the myths. Changes are made to suit the nature of the character and the shared universe.

  3. #3
    Astonishing Member Gaius's Avatar
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    Even the Greeks had competing or different versions of the same myths. So differences from the actual myths don’t bother me for the most part.
    Last edited by Gaius; 11-15-2020 at 05:47 AM.

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    Astonishing Member Tzigone's Avatar
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    I think fidelity to the concepts of the fandom (which has good Amazons, evil Mars/Ares, etc.) is more important than fidelity to the myths. I could understand if a, for a new fandom altogether, someone was not interested in something that went against the myths. Really, subversion is just an overused trope as the original things that were subverted these days (Cinderella-is-evil, heroes-are-bad-people, villains-are-woobies, etc.). But when dealing with a fictional mythos that already exists, staying true to its mythology is more important than a real-world one. That doesn't mean it can never be changed, of course. Just that the priority always lie with what's established in this universe.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vordan View Post
    So you want them to be evil misandrists? (I’m assuming you mean to say you’d be lying if you said you had no problem with them being evil misandrists).
    No I absolutely mean I don't want them to be evil misandrists. I may have needed to phrase that better.

  6. #6
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
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    Fidelity to the myths is not necessary. But I think it's very important that Wonder Woman writers have a great understanding of both the myths and of the theories used to interrogate the myths. The writers (and editors) should be able to understand what they are doing with the mythical material, and why.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

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    Astonishing Member Tzigone's Avatar
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    But I think it's very important that Wonder Woman writers have a great understanding of both the myths and of the theories used to interrogate the myths.
    I honestly just don't think that matters. Good stories and consistent representation of the myths/mythological figures within the fiction is enough.

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    The Last Dragon masterwitcher88's Avatar
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    I'm of the general belief that fidelity to the myths should be placed were it can be that doesn't take away from the Wondermythos. For example: Herakles can keep all his adventures while still enslaving the amazons because actual myth Herc did similar things, its not OOC for him. I don't even mind Hera being an antagonistic character, so long as she has redeemable qualities, which she does for the most part.
    Zaldrīzes Buzdari Iksos Daor

  9. #9
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tzigone View Post
    I honestly just don't think that matters. Good stories and consistent representation of the myths/mythological figures within the fiction is enough.
    For a character like Marvel Thor, I'd agree. But Wonder Woman was born out of ideology.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  10. #10
    Moderator Nyssane's Avatar
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    I'd say it's close to zero importance for me. I like reimaginings of the ancient myths.

    That said, I'm kinda tired of seeing the same old tropes over and over again (Ares and Hades being villainous, Medusa being a monster instead of a victim, child of Zeus being a prominent theme, etc.) and I appreciate when mythological figures are used in new, surprising ways. Hercules being a scumbag, for example, is something I'm happy the Wonder Woman mythos has depicted.

  11. #11
    Ultimate Member SiegePerilous02's Avatar
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    Since the main thing this IP has done right out of the gate is flip the script on the Amazons and make them heroes, they are not the daughters of Ares and were instead created by Aphrodite and are in fact in conflict with him, and Hercules is a bad guy...I'd say fidelity isn't that much of a priority. With the precedent established, pretty much anything goes after that.

    I think fidelity can still lead to strong stories the work with the Wonder Woman mythos. Perez's run and Historia lean into more accuracy (though both did/look to have their own liberties being taken) and work well with the themes Wonder Woman needs to function. But so does a Disney-fied take on myth like in the Golden Age comics, in which they are mostly window dressing meant to embellish the themes unique to Wonder Woman. Whether the story works on its own merits, and is chiefly entertaining, matters more than 100% accuracy to the myths. And like its been said, the original myths weren't consistent anyway.

  12. #12
    Astonishing Member WonderScott's Avatar
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    I like some characterization qualities about the gods in broad strokes, but other than that have fun with it and change whatever you’d like.

  13. #13
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    Rewriting the myths in order to reflect Wonder Woman's themes is more important than being accurate to them.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Z View Post
    I've complained about Hades being used as a villain and I'm fine if Ares isn't a villain in future stories. Then again, I'd be lying if I said I also had no problem with the Amazons not being evil misandrists. So how important is fidelity to the myths? How far can we take artistic license?
    Fidelity to the myths is not a necessity. They are the backdrop and can serve as a rich source of inspiration. However I fully expect the continued evolution of the myths a la Marston and the way he portrayed Hippolyte. Rucka thus far has been the only forward thinking writer aligning with that idea

  15. #15
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    I was familiar with the Greek myths before I learned about Wonder Woman, so I do have some issues with the 'artistic license'. I just know how the gods are related and what their responsibilities are, and it rubs me the wrong way if there are significant deviations. For example, in the first Rucka run, when suddenly Demeter was shown with bow and arrow, because the goddess Artemis could not be used to avoid confusion with the amazon Artemis. (Did DC think their readers are imbeciles?)

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