View Poll Results: Who is the definitive Superman writer?

Voters
59. You may not vote on this poll
  • Jerry Siegal

    5 8.47%
  • Otto Binder

    0 0%
  • Grant Morrison

    22 37.29%
  • Alan Moore

    4 6.78%
  • Mark Waid

    2 3.39%
  • Kurt Busiek

    2 3.39%
  • Eliott S! Maggin

    4 6.78%
  • John Byrne

    4 6.78%
  • Cary Bates

    2 3.39%
  • Mark Millar

    0 0%
  • Dan Jurgens

    7 11.86%
  • Jack Kirby

    0 0%
  • Geoff Johns

    2 3.39%
  • Other

    5 8.47%
  • See Results

    0 0%
Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst ... 34567
Results 91 to 101 of 101
  1. #91
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    758

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stanlos View Post
    There is a lot of discussion of the primacy of Supes or Clark and a lot seem to like the idea of Clark as a shell to lead in to Supes adventures with Supes being the authentic persona. I notice that was a point in the pitch posted in the thread from the millennium Braintree led by Morrison and Waid.

    I wanted to ask how you see that working and if there are any current example of the look and feel of that. I worry that the emphasis of distant lonely alien will get us the Snyder MOS Supes and I wondered if OI misinterpreted.
    To be honest, as much as I hate this I am in John Bryne's camp here, for Superman to have empathy and human feelings, he needs to be human first. Because he feels different he can sympathize with everyone, because he is strong he understands people's hard work from his parent. He understands sadness because he experienced sadness. He understands happiness because he experienced happiness. He understands anger because he always holds it. To understand and can convey it properly in the human term he needs to experience it from his human self.

    Superman self at the other hand to me is supposed to be his mask, a mask of a perfect hero an ever-smiling person that seems like Superpowered Fred Rogers. But that is just a facade, because Clark can't hold everything in his hands and that's where the interesting part of Superman start.

  2. #92
    Extraordinary Member manwhohaseverything's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    5,643

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laufeyson View Post
    To be honest, as much as I hate this I am in John Bryne's camp here, for Superman to have empathy and human feelings, he needs to be human first. Because he feels different he can sympathize with everyone, because he is strong he understands people's hard work from his parent. He understands sadness because he experienced sadness. He understands happiness because he experienced happiness. He understands anger because he always holds it. To understand and can convey it properly in the human term he needs to experience it from his human self.

    Superman self at the other hand to me is supposed to be his mask, a mask of a perfect hero an ever-smiling person that seems like Superpowered Fred Rogers. But that is just a facade, because Clark can't hold everything in his hands and that's where the interesting part of Superman start.
    I mean, goldenage superman was more relatable as working class dude. But, that's just me. Moreover, lonely alien isn't what you call him. He was more active than postcrisis. Alien is more silverage superman's deal.

    Superman being a mask is essentially telling readers that title of the book is not what you are getting and it doesn't matter. You are getting just a dude.

  3. #93
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    758

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by manwhohaseverything View Post
    I mean, goldenage superman was more relatable as working class dude. But, that's just me. Moreover, lonely alien isn't what you call him. He was more active than postcrisis. Alien is more silverage superman's deal.

    Superman being a mask is essentially telling readers that title of the book is not what you are getting and it doesn't matter. You are getting just a dude.
    I also like that Superman too, but to be honest every Superman that has his feeling of human in front is always my favorite. I think Superman being a mask essentially telling readers that the title is a lie is wrong. The way I think is that Superman is always there in that title. He is always inside every one of us. If Clark a shy, clumsy, yet kind-hearted good man can do his best for us, then we can also do it. It's not the power that made Superman, essentially it's the human self that made him into what he is. A Superhero.

    Lol, I read too much Kurt Busiek's stuff lately.

  4. #94
    Mighty Member Johnny Thunders!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    WGBS
    Posts
    1,909

    Default

    I just finished the first 4 Superman & Batman Generations story. I think this is the big nostalgia trip I expected from Byrne. It’s beautifully drawn and it shows he can tell a Superman story from any decade. It’s violent like the 90s but Byrne shows he could of thrived in the pre crisis Superman universe. It fits nicely with Maggin continuity. This reminds me of Byrnes FF run. Elseworlds were a nice format and Superman is right at home.

  5. #95
    BANNED
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    758

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Thunders! View Post
    I just finished the first 4 Superman & Batman Generations story. I think this is the big nostalgia trip I expected from Byrne. It’s beautifully drawn and it shows he can tell a Superman story from any decade. It’s violent like the 90s but Byrne shows he could of thrived in the pre crisis Superman universe. It fits nicely with Maggin continuity. This reminds me of Byrnes FF run. Elseworlds were a nice format and Superman is right at home.
    Oh yeah, I remember those books, I think the modern equivalent to that is the Spider-Man: Life Story. It's a good story that shows how much Byrne really understands his comic book history. But, still that books were amazing especially the ending where Superman and Batman are reminiscing their past in 2919 is really a nice touch to ending this book.
    Last edited by Laufeyson; 11-26-2020 at 08:20 AM.

  6. #96
    Standing Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    14,178

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Thunders! View Post
    I just finished the first 4 Superman & Batman Generations story. I think this is the big nostalgia trip I expected from Byrne. It’s beautifully drawn and it shows he can tell a Superman story from any decade. It’s violent like the 90s but Byrne shows he could of thrived in the pre crisis Superman universe. It fits nicely with Maggin continuity. This reminds me of Byrnes FF run. Elseworlds were a nice format and Superman is right at home.
    Wha? Are you saying you've never read them before? Or are you just going back to them again? I've already said how much I like those books. Not every decade was totally satisfying--some get pretty dark--but they each evoke something of the period that they're set in, comic book wise.
    🇨🇦
    [Exit, pursued
    by a bear.

  7. #97
    Mighty Member Johnny Thunders!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    WGBS
    Posts
    1,909

    Default

    I read them when they came out but I had given up on Byrne and new Superman comics.

  8. #98
    Mighty Member Johnny Thunders!'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    WGBS
    Posts
    1,909

    Default

    And boy do the decades fly by! I only have 4/12 of the 3rd series. I can’t believe I stopped. It’s 4th World and Wonder Woman?!?

  9. #99
    Extraordinary Member Vordan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    6,105

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Menacer View Post
    I really need someone to explain to me what is the appeal of this book.

    Let me preface that question with.

    I'm a massive Morrison fan.
    I love his new52 ac run.
    Morrison has other incredible work like Multiversity and Final Crisis...

    Then there's All Star Superman, one of the most pointed to go to stories by this community and seems commonly reveared.

    Let me also say I read primarly Superman in the 90s as a teenager ... then stopped. Since about 2016 I've been reading steady.

    I avoided buying All Star cause I hated the art, specifically that superman appears to be wearing a diaper and sweat pants in that rendition...

    Eventually I bought it at a used book store.

    Totally shocked at how basic and lame the story was. Visit to luthor, some demonstrations of strength, weird episode on bizarro world... not much going on...

    The Animated movie helped me enjoy the story more, but they refined a dud...

    Honestly it wasnt that bad, other then the art..



    Its just so so so hyped and I cant imagine why.

    I'd never point to such a basic story, as the best story of all time...

    Not trying to be rude but what do fan boys see in this particular story?

    So many great books, with great art... and this is everyones crown jewel???

    I voted Jurgens... but at least 5 or so of those names deserve big props.

    Morrison is definitely one of them
    I... don’t really know how to convince you otherwise? Like it seems like it’s just a matter of taste. If you don’t like Quietly’s art and aren’t impressed with the story, maybe it’s just not your thing? I myself am unimpressed with For All Seasons, I find that an incredibly basic book that doesn’t measure up at all to Loeb & Sale’s work on Batman and I don’t really understand why it’s so highly rated.

    The appeal of All-Star is that it’s a book that leans heavily into Superman’s mythos. It touches on everything from Lex to Ma & Pa, to Bizarro, to the Phantom Zone, to the Clark/Lois relationship. It showcases everything from Superman’s origin (reduced to a handful of panels that perfectly nails the core essentials) to his death and legacy (as seen with the Superman Squad and the appearance of Superman One Million). There’s some interesting analyses out there that dig deeper but at its surface it’s a love letter to every corner of the Superman universe. Supes even gets a character arc of coming to terms with how he’s made a mess of his personal life by keeping his true identity a secret from Lois for so long, and now that he’s trying to open up she doesn’t necessarily buy into the truth. And even as he tells her the truth of his identity, he still is keeping his approaching “death” a secret, showing that he’s still struggling to be completely honest.

  10. #100
    Standing Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    14,178

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vordan View Post
    If you donít like Quietlyís art and arenít impressed with the story, maybe itís just not your thing?
    Not a personal attack on you Vordan, but I see this spelling error so often, yours just gives me the chance to call it out, so maybe some folks will stop making it. Of course, this kind of error could happen for any number of reasons. My fingers seem to be dyslexic on the keyboard and I'm constantly combing through my posts to shift the order around, especially of vowels. Maybe our fingers just get in a habit, I don't know. And I have a friend, whose mother tongue is German, who always types quite for quiet and quiet for quite. My own errors make me sick--it's the worst thing when I see I've posted something wrong--and I'm vicariously getting sick over other folks' errors also.

    But the Frank Quitely error is so easy to catch, because if you type Quietly you're missing the joke. Vincent Deighan adopted the pen name "Frank Quitely" as a joke reversal of "Quite Frankly." So typing Quietly is like refusing to play along with Mr. Deighan's sense of humour.
    🇨🇦
    [Exit, pursued
    by a bear.

  11. #101
    Extraordinary Member Vordan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Posts
    6,105

    Default

    Lol no hard feelings. I didn’t even realize the pun but now I’ll hopefully remember the correct spelling going forward because of it.
    Last edited by Vordan; 11-26-2020 at 03:24 PM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •