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  1. #91
    Extraordinary Member Fokken's Avatar
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    My headcanon is that Lorna straightens her hair because most of the female powerhouses have straight hair so she wants to be taken seriously. I have had many super curled gal pals over the course of my life and the majority say they straighten their hair to fit in with what they view as "the beauty standard".

    I hope that with Kate's remastered mane, so too will Lorna return to BIG and BOMBASTIC one day.

  2. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by nandes View Post
    It's not a theme. It's a individual scene where two friends joke around, and then a comment made by a villain. A villain always says bad things about the protagonists of the book - it doesn't mean the writer wants the reader to think these views are true. It's just the villain's point of view.

    What does "acknowledgment of how long she's been in the comics" mean? And why would she need to reference the Genoshan genocide in a completely different context? Nowhere also the book pretends that she never experienced the concept of death... It's a story set in the current status quo, an age where the mutants think they've conquered death and are invincible. The story in X-Factor #4 is about Lorna being somebody who's feels strongly about her teammate's death due to self-doubt and then enters into shock when she finds he can't be brought back. It's a huge surprise for the mutants in Krakoa in general because they thought they were past those days, and it hits Lorna the hardest because she feels responsible - not because she really was responsible for Rockslide's death, but because of her own struggles. Leah does not need to name all of her struggles for the reader to be able to understand that.
    You skipped the implication of Lorna being treated as "stupid" for not being able to get the prophecies out of her in X-Factor #4 until she was yelled at, and Lorna following up by outright calling it a humiliation. Three situations with three different characters across 6 issues with the same underlying message is a theme.

    Acknowledgment means demonstrating in some manner that Lorna has been around for a long time. It can be as simple as a line about how Lorna fought alongside Jean back when the X-Men started. Everything written thus far is written in such a way that long-time hardcore fans can technically claim it's acknowledging her history, while in reality remaining vague enough for new readers to easily think she's a random new character just created this decade and however she gets depicted here is just fine even if it goes completely against past development.

    X-Factor #4 demonstrates clearer than any other time why the Genoshan genocide needs to be referenced. Everything about her usage in X-Factor #4 goes against that experience and how she developed from it. It treated her like the Genoshan genocide never happened, which is akin to writing Batman and acting like he just randomly decided to dress up as a bat one day and is simply a goofy cosplayer who doesn't have any past trauma or understand how bad crime can be.

    Even with the constant, endless retelling of Batman's parents being murdered, I'm sure most people would complain if Batman had a huge breakdown over someone he doesn't know dying nearby. Lorna doesn't even have those retellings. She just has Marvel pretending the genocide never happened for the past 15 years.

    Leah doesn't need to name all of Lorna's struggles. But she DOES need to name the important struggles. The Genoshan genocide is not just an important struggle, it's the most important struggle she's ever had in her life. Everything else pales in comparison. You don't come out of surviving millions of people murdered around you all begging for you personally to save them, go through a period of PTSD so deep it guts you, and then just walk away from that never thinking about it ever again. Trauma isn't an on/off switch where you can just pretend it never happened when it's no longer convenient. Nobody's expecting Leah to whip out every minute detail of everything she's ever been through. Nobody's expecting her to write a five issue story arc on Lorna having body image issues because one writer way back in the 90s had one issue where Lorna talked about it. But she is expected to acknowledge and be informed by the greatest trauma Lorna's ever endured when writing her dealing with trauma. Just as you would not want someone to write Magneto acting like he can't handle the death of a mutant he never knew while ignoring that he's a Holocaust survivor.

    Your pointing out how mutants thought resurrection was infallible, only to find out otherwise during the event, could have made for a good story with Lorna if her Genoshan genocide history played into it. Lorna could've been written as someone who believed such a genocide could never happen again, that she or others would never again have to go through what she and the people on that day did, and finding out otherwise hit her hard. But we have to deal with the reality of what got published, and what got published didn't do any of that. What got published treated her like someone who doesn't have any concept of death and never had any experiences with it until that moment, let alone having witnessed millions of deaths that constantly replayed all around her before she was dug out of Genosha's ruins.

    There's a massive disconnect between who Lorna is and should be based on her experiences, and who Marvel wants to pretend she is and make people think she is to fit their nostalgia and stereotypes about her worth. X-Factor makes that gulf wider and clearer with every issue. If they can find the time to knock Lorna on three different occasions - even if we go along with your framing of it - then they can find the time to acknowledge what happened to her on Genosha. It can't be that hard to remove one case of someone implying Lorna's stupid to instead show some empathy for her as a genocide survivor.
    Last edited by salarta; 01-21-2021 at 11:37 AM.
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  3. #93
    Amazing Member UncannyLZ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by salarta View Post
    I haven't read the run, still don't want to, but I see that one thing as good especially immediately following how badly Claremont treated her.



    Exiles version Lorna is among the top depictions of her IMO, and I think the uniform is fine for that version but not for 616. It was pretty clear Jeff Parker was putting some real thought into Lorna and Wanda as sisters and the Magnus family in general.
    Wait...how is Exiles Lorna your top depiction if you’ve never read any other version including her X-Factor vol 1 era? That run seems to have given everything you’ve been asking for (body issues, experience with her powers, she breaks up with Havok etc).

  4. #94

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    Quote Originally Posted by UncannyLZ View Post
    Wait...how is Exiles Lorna your top depiction if you’ve never read any other version including her X-Factor vol 1 era? That run seems to have given everything you’ve been asking for (body issues, experience with her powers, she breaks up with Havok etc).
    I've read other versions of Lorna.

    Especially if your definition of version includes different periods of the 616.

    Saying I haven't read one run doesn't mean I haven't read anything. Also, saying I haven't read a run doesn't mean I haven't read parts of it.
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  5. #95
    Hi, Sage. nandes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by salarta View Post
    You skipped the implication of Lorna being treated as "stupid" for not being able to get the prophecies out of her in X-Factor #4 until she was yelled at, and Lorna following up by outright calling it a humiliation. Three situations with three different characters across 6 issues with the same underlying message is a theme.

    Acknowledgment means demonstrating in some manner that Lorna has been around for a long time. It can be as simple as a line about how Lorna fought alongside Jean back when the X-Men started. Everything written thus far is written in such a way that long-time hardcore fans can technically claim it's acknowledging her history, while in reality remaining vague enough for new readers to easily think she's a random new character just created this decade and however she gets depicted here is just fine even if it goes completely against past development.

    X-Factor #4 demonstrates clearer than any other time why the Genoshan genocide needs to be referenced. Everything about her usage in X-Factor #4 goes against that experience and how she developed from it. It treated her like the Genoshan genocide never happened, which is akin to writing Batman and acting like he just randomly decided to dress up as a bat one day and is simply a goofy cosplayer who doesn't have any past trauma or understand how bad crime can be.

    Even with the constant, endless retelling of Batman's parents being murdered, I'm sure most people would complain if Batman had a huge breakdown over someone he doesn't know dying nearby. Lorna doesn't even have those retellings. She just has Marvel pretending the genocide never happened for the past 15 years.

    Leah doesn't need to name all of Lorna's struggles. But she DOES need to name the important struggles. The Genoshan genocide is not just an important struggle, it's the most important struggle she's ever had in her life. Everything else pales in comparison. You don't come out of surviving millions of people murdered around you all begging for you personally to save them, go through a period of PTSD so deep it guts you, and then just walk away from that never thinking about it ever again. Trauma isn't an on/off switch where you can just pretend it never happened when it's no longer convenient. Nobody's expecting Leah to whip out every minute detail of everything she's ever been through. Nobody's expecting her to write a five issue story arc on Lorna having body image issues because one writer way back in the 90s had one issue where Lorna talked about it. But she is expected to acknowledge and be informed by the greatest trauma Lorna's ever endured when writing her dealing with trauma. Just as you would not want someone to write Magneto acting like he can't handle the death of a mutant he never knew while ignoring that he's a Holocaust survivor.

    Your pointing out how mutants thought resurrection was infallible, only to find out otherwise during the event, could have made for a good story with Lorna if her Genoshan genocide history played into it. Lorna could've been written as someone who believed such a genocide could never happen again, that she or others would never again have to go through what she and the people on that day did, and finding out otherwise hit her hard. But we have to deal with the reality of what got published, and what got published didn't do any of that. What got published treated her like someone who doesn't have any concept of death and never had any experiences with it until that moment, let alone having witnessed millions of deaths that constantly replayed all around her before she was dug out of Genosha's ruins.

    There's a massive disconnect between who Lorna is and should be based on her experiences, and who Marvel wants to pretend she is and make people think she is to fit their nostalgia and stereotypes about her worth. X-Factor makes that gulf wider and clearer with every issue. If they can find the time to knock Lorna on three different occasions - even if we go along with your framing of it - then they can find the time to acknowledge what happened to her on Genosha. It can't be that hard to remove one case of someone implying Lorna's stupid to instead show some empathy for her as a genocide survivor.
    She was already emotionally vulnerable and couldn't figure out the prophecy because she was affected by Rockslide's permanent death, with Magneto screaming at her being a demonstration of the heavy expectations he sets towards her. Again, not a story about her being "stupid' - unless deliberately taken out of context - but a empathetic portrayal of someone who's being pressured to do something when they have already many things to deal with mentally. Implying the writing isn't empathetic towards her is just completely different to what's actually on the page.

    So far, Leah has acknowledged Lorna's story with Krakoa, her relationships with other former X-Factor members, her family and her past leadership experience. Unless they completely skimmed the comics and missed all that, I really doubt any new reader would think she's a new character. If that was vague, then I'm not sure how anything could be more explicit other than a "check out Giant Size X-Men #1 to understand how Lorna catapulted Krakoa into space!" editor's note, which contemporary comics haven't done in a while.

    I've stated in other posts how everything in X-Factor #4 is informed by Lorna's past struggles. It does not treat her as if the Genoshan genocide never happened or if she has no idea of the concept of death. Marvel as a whole has not pretended the Genosha genocide hasn't happened for the last 15 years, in fact, it's a major point in HoXPoX as a reason for why mutants need to stand united and fortify themselves, and again in later issues it's stated as an objective for the ressurection protocols to bring back all the mutants who died. And again, implying that she had a breakdown "because of someone random who died" is ignoring the context of the story and how her reaction is informed by her own mental health - which is again relevant to the same trauma you claim "Marvel" has supposedly ignored.

  6. #96

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    Quote Originally Posted by nandes View Post
    She was already emotionally vulnerable and couldn't figure out the prophecy because she was affected by Rockslide's permanent death, with Magneto screaming at her being a demonstration of the heavy expectations he sets towards her. Again, not a story about her being "stupid' - unless deliberately taken out of context - but a empathetic portrayal of someone who's being pressured to do something when they have already many things to deal with mentally. Implying the writing isn't empathetic towards her is just completely different to what's actually on the page.

    So far, Leah has acknowledged Lorna's story with Krakoa, her relationships with other former X-Factor members, her family and her past leadership experience. Unless they completely skimmed the comics and missed all that, I really doubt any new reader would think she's a new character. If that was vague, then I'm not sure how anything could be more explicit other than a "check out Giant Size X-Men #1 to understand how Lorna catapulted Krakoa into space!" editor's note, which contemporary comics haven't done in a while.

    I've stated in other posts how everything in X-Factor #4 is informed by Lorna's past struggles. It does not treat her as if the Genoshan genocide never happened or if she has no idea of the concept of death. Marvel as a whole has not pretended the Genosha genocide hasn't happened for the last 15 years, in fact, it's a major point in HoXPoX as a reason for why mutants need to stand united and fortify themselves, and again in later issues it's stated as an objective for the ressurection protocols to bring back all the mutants who died. And again, implying that she had a breakdown "because of someone random who died" is ignoring the context of the story and how her reaction is informed by her own mental health - which is again relevant to the same trauma you claim "Marvel" has supposedly ignored.
    By itself, topic in first paragraph can be interpreted as you say. But with repeated incidents, especially the latest issue and dialogue with Siryn at the end, it becomes part of a pattern.

    You mention "deliberately taken out of context." Taking something out of context isn't just looking at one page and missing another. It's also looking at the scenes like they're entirely separate from each other, and as if they don't exist as multiple scenes across a whole run in aggregate. It's easy to think a problem doesn't exist if incidents are treated like they're completely separate and have no real bearing on each other or the project as a whole. If trying to keep a building secure, it's easier to shrug off a security lapse if each case is isolated and treated like a fluke that no one could have predicted. It's harder if you look at all the cases combined and see they're variations of the same underlying flaw.

    The writing of X-Factor #4 taken entirely by itself may be arguably empathetic to an idea of Lorna where she's a brand new character created by Leah. It's not empathetic to Lorna as an existing character whose history with trauma and responses to it we've seen previously, and how she developed over time from them. Which does not match what X-Factor #4 did.

    We saw how Lorna, overwhelmed and traumatized, tried to escape the horror of the Genoshan genocide.



    And if Lorna was never used after this moment - never had New X-Men #132, never had the Austen run, never had anything for the past 15 years - maybe X-Factor #4 would fit. But we've had stories since.

    We saw her, while still grappling with trauma, struggle with and question her mental state but then very quickly recompose and go on to do the task at hand.



    We saw her handle the trauma of losing her powers, very soon after losing so much else, by rushing in to a fight and nearly getting herself killed hoping her powers would come back.



    There are a lot of scenes I thought to post images of (as always, limited to 3). I opted for ones that I think are less commonly seen, and that I think fit closer to your argument. I could have posted pages where Lorna responded to other traumas by going power mad - reversing everyone's blood flow when left at the altar of her wedding and wanting to kill Annie, or nearly destroying the world after learning she killed her parents in her origin story. I could have posted from X-Factor #260, where Lorna responded to death within the team (who she was closer to than Rockslide) and the group disbanding by trying to drown her sorrows in alcohol, and violently lashing out at Pietro when he showed up. Those depictions all suggest a Lorna who would, when Rockslide died, react by taking a more aggressive stance. Compared to what X-Factor #4 did where its version of Lorna is incredibly passive, emotionally falling apart cause a mutant she didn't really know died near her, and for some reason part of her wishes she didn't exist. But I included the scenes above as they're closer to what X-Factor #4 did. And even being closer, where she's breaking down and incredibly vulnerable, they still show her quickly picking herself up, making her own plan of action (not having it told or compelled onto her) and following it.

    Fact of the matter is, the current X-Factor isn't writing from what Lorna's gone through. It's writing from a stereotype of who she is based on the 90s and earlier, but pretending it and she are all brand new.

    I've talked about this book's "acknowledgment" of Krakoa and such already. How it's written in such a way where you need to be a long-time hardcore X-Men fan to catch those things, and if you're not then it looks like quirky text that Leah just made up. The closest she's come so far to acknowledging Lorna's history was Lorna and Siryn talking about what Siryn had to do to help Lorna back in X-Factor #244; which notably DIDN'T acknowledge Lorna's origin story being told. It didn't say "Siryn had to do that to help Lorna deal with learning she killed her parents in a plane crash when her powers awoke as a kid." It just said, quote, "I once came so close to cracking this world apart like an egg that you had to make a deal to host an ancient death goddess just to save my 'fractured' mind..." Just enough to establish Lorna and Siryn have a history, which Siryn needs for a story arc focused on her. Not enough to learn something meaningful about Lorna herself.

    But, in fairness, the scene does for once acknowledge Lorna has some history. In that it acknowledges Lorna's existed as far back as 2012. It's better than past issues in that regard.

    Speaking of "better thans." I noted on other sites that while I stand by all my complaints to date on X-Factor, one silver lining is that at least what it did to Lorna in X-Factor #4 wasn't purely so a man could swoop in and comfort her or mansplain to her. We didn't see her acting like she doesn't know what surprise attacks are so Magneto can mansplain what surprise attacks to her, or breaking down and blaming herself for getting turned into Pestilence so Havok could be a big strong man whose shoulder she cries on. So in THAT sense, X-Factor's at least not being sexist toward Lorna, which is better than a lot of past treatment.

    But I see X-Factor's problems as worse - cutting at the character's core, and making sexism from future writers more likely because history that would dissuade it is being ignored (it's not a far jump from "Aww, Lorna can't handle Rockslide's death" to "Hey, maybe next time she has a break down like that a man can come in, wipe her tears and make the bogeyman go away"). And to make this very clear: I am not accusing Leah of deliberately setting Lorna up for such future writing. I'm saying treatment thus far increases the risk despite any intentions she has.

    No, the book acknowledging Lorna's history with Krakoa doesn't require citing a specific issue. But true acknowledgment would've been something along the lines like "Hey, remember when Storm, Cyclops, and Havok helped me throw you into space?" That provides readers a clear sense of "Huh, so she's been around a while and has history with familiar names." As opposed to what X-Factor #1 did where you could just as easily imagine she's Krakoa's ex-girlfriend and they had a bad break-up.

    And lastly, this

    Quote Originally Posted by nandes View Post
    Marvel as a whole has not pretended the Genosha genocide hasn't happened for the last 15 years, in fact, it's a major point in HoXPoX as a reason for why mutants need to stand united and fortify themselves, and again in later issues it's stated as an objective for the ressurection protocols to bring back all the mutants who died.
    is the whole point. The problem isn't Marvel pretending the Genoshan genocide itself didn't happen. The problem is Marvel pretending the Genoshan genocide didn't happen to Lorna. They have no problem with Jean having a big battle on X-Men Red with Cassandra Nova on Genosha's ruins, or Storm expressing outrage at its deaths, or Red Skull using its dead in Axis. But they apparently have a massive 15-year-old problem with the idea of Lorna being recognized as an important and meaningful figure in what happened there, and that it had a real impact on her. It's wrong that characters who had no stake in Genosha get to talk about it and use it, but a character who survived it and had major trauma from it worked out during Austen's run of the main X-Men title is ignored. This isn't a problem just with X-Factor. It's a problem with Marvel as a whole. But X-Factor exacerbated the problem by ignoring it even in X-Factor #4 where it should've had a huge impact on her depiction.

    And that's enough text for now, time for me to go get something to eat.
    Last edited by salarta; 01-25-2021 at 12:56 PM.
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  7. #97
    Hi, Sage. nandes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by salarta View Post
    By itself, topic in first paragraph can be interpreted as you say. But with repeated incidents, especially the latest issue and dialogue with Siryn at the end, it becomes part of a pattern.
    It's deliberately taken out of context because of the insistence of taking separate scenes with different meanings (friends joking around with eachother, an issue centering on Lorna's personal struggles and then a villain threatening Lorna) and merging them together as if they're part of a narrative that doesn't exist.

    Quote Originally Posted by salarta View Post
    The writing of X-Factor #4 taken entirely by itself may be arguably empathetic to an idea of Lorna where she's a brand new character created by Leah. It's not empathetic to Lorna as an existing character whose history with trauma and responses to it we've seen previously, and how she developed over time from them. Which does not match what X-Factor #4 did.

    There are a lot of scenes I thought to post images of (as always, limited to 3). I opted for ones that I think are less commonly seen, and that I think fit closer to your argument. I could have posted pages where Lorna responded to other traumas by going power mad - reversing everyone's blood flow when left at the altar of her wedding and wanting to kill Annie, or nearly destroying the world after learning she killed her parents in her origin story. I could have posted from X-Factor #260, where Lorna responded to death within the team (who she was closer to than Rockslide) and the group disbanding by trying to drown her sorrows in alcohol, and violently lashing out at Pietro when he showed up. Those depictions all suggest a Lorna who would, when Rockslide died, react by taking a more aggressive stance. Compared to what X-Factor #4 did where its version of Lorna is incredibly passive, emotionally falling apart cause a mutant she didn't really know died near her, and for some reason part of her wishes she didn't exist. But I included the scenes above as they're closer to what X-Factor #4 did. And even being closer, where she's breaking down and incredibly vulnerable, they still show her quickly picking herself up, making her own plan of action (not having it told or compelled onto her) and following it.

    Fact of the matter is, the current X-Factor isn't writing from what Lorna's gone through. It's writing from a stereotype of who she is based on the 90s and earlier, but pretending it and she are all brand new.
    Again, you're deliberately missing that the point of the issue is that Lorna's breakdown is not entirely motived due to Rockslide, but about her own personal struggles, which includes her past history with trauma. She also "picks herself up" at the end of the issue by constructing the shrine and helping the mutants to get into the tournament. And even if it that didn't happen at the end, it would still be a respectable portrayal of how grief can be intensified by shame and anxiety. The Lorna that was seen in the Austen or Milligan era has changed and moved past that as various other characters do, and even then, she wasn't only dealing her problems by being aggressive either.

    You can disagree with Leah's vision as freely as you like, I don't mind, but my problem is that there's no need to imply it's based on "nostalgia" or that she's writing a brand new character, because she has been respecting and acknowledging her history through the entire book.

    Quote Originally Posted by salarta View Post
    I've talked about this book's "acknowledgment" of Krakoa and such already. How it's written in such a way where you need to be a long-time hardcore X-Men fan to catch those things, and if you're not then it looks like quirky text that Leah just made up. The closest she's come so far to acknowledging Lorna's history was Lorna and Siryn talking about what Siryn had to do to help Lorna back in X-Factor #244; which notably DIDN'T acknowledge Lorna's origin story being told. It didn't say "Siryn had to do that to help Lorna deal with learning she killed her parents in a plane crash when her powers awoke as a kid." It just said, quote, "I once came so close to cracking this world apart like an egg that you had to make a deal to host an ancient death goddess just to save my 'fractured' mind..." Just enough to establish Lorna and Siryn have a history, which Siryn needs for a story arc focused on her. Not enough to learn something meaningful about Lorna herself.

    But, in fairness, the scene does for once acknowledge Lorna has some history. In that it acknowledges Lorna's existed as far back as 2012. It's better than past issues in that regard.

    No, the book acknowledging Lorna's history with Krakoa doesn't require citing a specific issue. But true acknowledgment would've been something along the lines like "Hey, remember when Storm, Cyclops, and Havok helped me throw you into space?" That provides readers a clear sense of "Huh, so she's been around a while and has history with familiar names." As opposed to what X-Factor #1 did where you could just as easily imagine she's Krakoa's ex-girlfriend and they had a bad break-up.
    Well that's entirely your reading of other people's potential impressions, but really any reader could understand that it's a reference and google it. Giant Size X-Men #1 also happens to be one of the most well known comic issues of all time.

    Quote Originally Posted by salarta View Post
    Speaking of "better thans." I noted on other sites that while I stand by all my complaints to date on X-Factor, one silver lining is that at least what it did to Lorna in X-Factor #4 wasn't purely so a man could swoop in and comfort her or mansplain to her. We didn't see her acting like she doesn't know what surprise attacks are so Magneto can mansplain what surprise attacks to her, or breaking down and blaming herself for getting turned into Pestilence so Havok could be a big strong man whose shoulder she cries on. So in THAT sense, X-Factor's at least not being sexist toward Lorna, which is better than a lot of past treatment.

    But I see X-Factor's problems as worse - cutting at the character's core, and making sexism from future writers more likely because history that would dissuade it is being ignored (it's not a far jump from "Aww, Lorna can't handle Rockslide's death" to "Hey, maybe next time she has a break down like that a man can come in, wipe her tears and make the bogeyman go away"). And to make this very clear: I am not accusing Leah of deliberately setting Lorna up for such future writing. I'm saying treatment thus far increases the risk despite any intentions she has.
    But you're still implying that a female writer writing a female character with mental health issues is somehow a path or short cut for sexism, which is way off the mark.
    Last edited by nandes; 01-24-2021 at 02:32 PM.

  8. #98
    Astonishing Member Soulsword323's Avatar
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    Polaris and her family.

    I don't know who exactly made these, so I'm just going to post the Tumblr link.

    https://betterthanlegos.tumblr.com/p...051904/xcerpts






  9. #99
    Extraordinary Member Phoenixx9's Avatar
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    So I have a question about Lorna's parents.

    In the issue before Lorna's introduction, the man running the modeling campaign where Jean was working was named "Mr Dane". I have never heard anyone mention this before. It seems too coincidental. What is known about Lorna's parents?
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  10. #100
    Astonishing Member Soulsword323's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phoenixx9 View Post
    So I have a question about Lorna's parents.

    In the issue before Lorna's introduction, the man running the modeling campaign where Jean was working was named "Mr Dane". I have never heard anyone mention this before. It seems too coincidental. What is known about Lorna's parents?
    Not much. We know her stepfather was a pilot, but we know next to nothing about Lorna's adoptive parents and Suzanna.

  11. #101
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    Isn’t there some confusion how she’s related to her adopted parents?

    I’ve heard her Foster father is Suzanna’s brother. But I’ve also heard her Foster mother is Suzanna’s sister.

  12. #102
    Extraordinary Member Phoenixx9's Avatar
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    When Lorna first appeared in San Francisco, she mentions something like she lives 1200 miles east of there and was confused as to how she arrived. Jean's modeling with "Mr Dane" was in New York City at the same time Lorna showed up on panel. Was there ever any mention of which state Lorna was from or where she grew up/lived?
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  13. #103
    Astonishing Member Soulsword323's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Evans View Post
    Isn’t there some confusion how she’s related to her adopted parents?

    I’ve heard her Foster father is Suzanna’s brother. But I’ve also heard her Foster mother is Suzanna’s sister.
    I believe it was stated that her adoptive mother was the sister of Arnold, her stepfather. Technically Dane wasn't her original last name.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phoenixx9 View Post
    When Lorna first appeared in San Francisco, she mentions something like she lives 1200 miles east of there and was confused as to how she arrived. Jean's modeling with "Mr Dane" was in New York City at the same time Lorna showed up on panel. Was there ever any mention of which state Lorna was from or where she grew up/lived?
    I don't recall. We don't know much about Lorna's childhood, other then she would dye her hair to blend in. I don't think there is a canon connection to the "Mr. Dane" you keep referring to.
    Last edited by Soulsword323; 01-25-2021 at 09:43 AM.

  14. #104
    Extraordinary Member Phoenixx9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Soulsword323 View Post
    I believe it was stated that her adoptive mother was the sister of Arnold, her stepfather. Technically Dane wasn't her original last name.



    I don't recall. We don't know much about Lorna' childhood, other then she would dye her hair to blend in. I don't think there is a canon connection to the "Mr. Dane" you keep referring to.
    Thanks. Just trying to piece together what I know and ask you all about what I do not. I always wondered about these things.
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    Astonishing Member Soulsword323's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phoenixx9 View Post
    Thanks. Just trying to piece together what I know and ask you all about what I do not. I always wondered about these things.
    You're welcome!

    I guess it was just a coincidence? I don't think there was a connection. We don't even know Polaris' adoptive parents names, or the surname of Zusanna. A lot left to flesh out when it comes to Lorna's past.

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