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  1. #136
    Invincible Jersey Girl Tami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackDaw View Post
    That was very similar to my experience...except after 24 hours took paracetamol and felt substantially better very quickly.

    I afterwards found out that a fair number of nurses are advising taking paracetamol straight after Astra Zeneca jab, and I intend doing that when I get second dose. (Though I’d expect fewer side effects next time round anyway.)
    Not use to it being called that. You mean Tylenol or ************* as we say here in the States. Good to know that it helps.
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  2. #137
    Invincible Jersey Girl Tami's Avatar
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    The Story of One Dose Inside the sprawling operational puzzle of bringing the Johnson & Johnson COVID vaccine to the public.

    Pfizer and Moderna crossed the finish line first, neck and neck, in December. The third and most recently approved vaccine was from Johnson & Johnson. The J&J vaccine holds some crucial advantages: Only one dose is required rather than two, and while the other approved vaccines expire 30 days after thawing, Johnson & Johnson’s lasts three months, making it easier to distribute in countries that lack an advanced cold chain. The story of the vaccine’s path from development to mass distribution is a lesson in the power of the global capitalist system — the network of corporations and supply chains that, though it can suffocate and disempower us as individuals, can also summon forth immense material and intellectual resources and deploy them for the greater good.
    Pfizer and Moderna crossed the finish line first, neck and neck, in December. The third and most recently approved vaccine was from Johnson & Johnson. The J&J vaccine holds some crucial advantages: Only one dose is required rather than two, and while the other approved vaccines expire 30 days after thawing, Johnson & Johnson’s lasts three months, making it easier to distribute in countries that lack an advanced cold chain. The story of the vaccine’s path from development to mass distribution is a lesson in the power of the global capitalist system — the network of corporations and supply chains that, though it can suffocate and disempower us as individuals, can also summon forth immense material and intellectual resources and deploy them for the greater good.
    The setback was significant, but not fatal. The facility where the mix-up occurred was part of a production process that relies on a precise orchestration of timing, engineering, and logistical expertise across multiple continents, which makes it vulnerable to bad luck and human error. But the system is also resilient: When the batch of J&J doses was compromised, alternative supply lines were available to compensate for the failure. Here is how that entire tempestuous journey unfolded — the breakthroughs, the setbacks, and the way the pieces came together to bring vaccines to millions of arms.
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  3. #138
    Invincible Jersey Girl Tami's Avatar
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  4. #139
    Invincible Jersey Girl Tami's Avatar
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    Why covid arm and other post-vaccine rashes might actually be a ‘good thing’

    Tina Burke, 40, a nurse who works on the oncology floor at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), received her first coronavirus shot on Jan. 3. Six days later, she developed a rash on her injected arm but “thought nothing of it.” The next morning, however, she woke up and found her hands and the heels of her feet covered with itchy red bumps.

    “It spread all over my hands and around the heels of my feet, and I could even feel one on the roof of my mouth,” she says. “The itching was so bad I couldn’t sleep.”

    She thought the rash could be a side effect of the vaccine — in her case Moderna — and worried she wouldn’t be able to get her second dose.

    “That was my biggest fear,” she says. “I wanted to be able to get it. I was more anxious about not getting it, than I was about the reaction itself.”
    “Covid arm,” a red, rashlike skin reaction that can occur at the injection site days after inoculation, has been well-publicized. But some patients also are developing delayed skin reactions on other areas of the body after receiving one of the messenger RNA (mRNA) vaccines, which include one made by Pfizer-BioNTech.
    “We have been seeing other types of post-vaccine skin reactions on different parts of the body, in addition to rashes on the inoculated arm,” says Esther Freeman, director of Global Health Dermatology at MGH, associate professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School, and lead author of a paper on the topic published last week in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. “These reactions are unusual and generally mild, and typically resolve on their own or with over-the-counter treatment,” such as topical steroid creams and antihistamines.

    If they occur after the first dose, they shouldn’t prevent anyone from getting the second, experts say. “Even though skin reactions to a vaccine can look scary, most are not severe or long-lasting, and show us that your body likely is developing a nice strong immune response to the vaccine, which is a good thing,” Freeman says.
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  5. #140
    Invincible Jersey Girl Tami's Avatar
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    You've been vaccinated. So what should you do with your vaccine card?

    More than 100 million Americans have received at least one COVID-19 vaccine shot. The proof? A 4-by-3-inch paper "vaccination record card" issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    In a post-pandemic world, that humble card for those who are fully vaccinated could become an important document used for travel, attending events, returning to the post-pandemic office and other purposes. Here's what experts say you should know about vaccination cards.
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  6. #141
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
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    The idea of whether the vaccine card could be useful for public and private purposes is an interesting question.

    There's some concern about slippery slopes, although the situation is sui generis enough that it shouldn't lead to other restrictions.

    One persuasive argument is that allowing vaccination cards to have significant benefits could result in pushback from people who can't vaccinated yet, and dealt with major restrictions for a disease that was much more catastrophic for older and sicker people. There could be resentment if an 82 year old gets to travel thanks to a vaccine card, but a 24 year old can't get a vaccine appointment yet. This will be resolved soon enough, since we're getting to the point where pretty much any adult who wants can make an appointment.
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  7. #142
    All-New Member Kid Devil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    pretty much any adult who wants can make an appointment.
    In my college I was talking to five other people in my class and they all had the first dose or were scheduled for it. I was surprised since we are all in our early twenties, although I personally have not had an appointment for it or one planned.

  8. #143
    Astonishing Member Kusanagi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    The idea of whether the vaccine card could be useful for public and private purposes is an interesting question.

    There's some concern about slippery slopes, although the situation is sui generis enough that it shouldn't lead to other restrictions.

    One persuasive argument is that allowing vaccination cards to have significant benefits could result in pushback from people who can't vaccinated yet, and dealt with major restrictions for a disease that was much more catastrophic for older and sicker people. There could be resentment if an 82 year old gets to travel thanks to a vaccine card, but a 24 year old can't get a vaccine appointment yet. This will be resolved soon enough, since we're getting to the point where pretty much any adult who wants can make an appointment.
    I think this will be a bigger issue in countries that have stricter lockdowns, namely many European countries.

    In the US there aren't many things entirely unavailable, so long as your willing to wear a mask (in certain states there's no real restrictions at all), and with everyone over 16 soon to be eligible nation wide not getting vaccinated is soon to become a personal choice.

    Aside from international travel, and probably some events like concerts (theme parks?), I'm not sure what would actually require a vaccine passport.
    Last edited by Kusanagi; 04-12-2021 at 04:35 AM.
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  9. #144
    Old school comic book fan WestPhillyPunisher's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kusanagi View Post
    I think this will be a bigger issue in countries that have stricter lockdowns, namely many European countries.

    In the US there aren't many things entirely unavailable, so long as your willing to wear a mask (in certain states there's no real restrictions at all), and with everyone over 16 soon to be eligible nation wide not getting vaccinated is soon to become a personal choice.

    Aside from international travel, and probably some events like concerts (theme parks?), I'm note sure what would actually require a vaccine passport.
    What irks me is that there's no unified policy in the US about something as simple as mask wearing, and we have Donald Trump and the Republican Party to thank for that after they politicized what should NEVER have been an issue to begin with. You have states run by Democrats who've pushed masks and caution while states run by Republicans have mostly done the polar opposite. The whole thing is crazy and confusing.
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  10. #145
    Invincible Jersey Girl Tami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    The idea of whether the vaccine card could be useful for public and private purposes is an interesting question.

    There's some concern about slippery slopes, although the situation is sui generis enough that it shouldn't lead to other restrictions.

    One persuasive argument is that allowing vaccination cards to have significant benefits could result in pushback from people who can't vaccinated yet, and dealt with major restrictions for a disease that was much more catastrophic for older and sicker people. There could be resentment if an 82 year old gets to travel thanks to a vaccine card, but a 24 year old can't get a vaccine appointment yet. This will be resolved soon enough, since we're getting to the point where pretty much any adult who wants can make an appointment.
    For now, my only thought regarding my card is that I need to keep it safe [and away from my paper-loving dogs] long enough to bring it with me when I get my second dose. I kind of doubt that this card will be used as proof of vaccination for entry into stores or for travel.

    I think this will be a situation that evolves over time. Mostly dependant on how much under control the outbreak becomes, if it stays a long-lasting health threat or devolves into just another Flu that people get, then stay home from work for a day or three, then are fine afterward.

    If it is no longer a major health threat, if vaccinations become the norm, treatments become commonplace, and the risk of serious illness or death are minimized, then we won't need proof of vaccination.
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  11. #146
    Extraordinary Member Phoenixx9's Avatar
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    Right now, the cards are not needed for anything. Some few...people... are talking about using them for everything, from entry points to airflight, events, being able to shop, etc.

    Hopefully, smarter heads will prevail and these cards will be used just as the personal vaccination records for healthcare that they were meant to be.
    [Quote Originally Posted by Thor-El 10-15-2020 12:32 PM]


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  12. #147
    CBR's Good Fairy Kieran_Frost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phoenixx9 View Post
    Right now, the cards are not needed for anything. Some few...people... are talking about using them for everything, from entry points to airflight, events, being able to shop, etc.

    Hopefully, smarter heads will prevail and these cards will be used just as the personal vaccination records for healthcare that they were meant to be.
    It would be a helpful way to speed up opening the theatres. Right now the performance sector is HURTING! And can't open at half capacity, because they won't break even. The cards could help speed that up. But I agree it's a difficult situation... for all the positives, there can be some very serious negatives. I don't envy the people having to make this decision.
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  13. #148
    Extraordinary Member Phoenixx9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kieran_Frost View Post
    It would be a helpful way to speed up opening the theatres. Right now the performance sector is HURTING! And can't open at half capacity, because they won't break even. The cards could help speed that up. But I agree it's a difficult situation... for all the positives, there can be some very serious negatives. I don't envy the people having to make this decision.
    I can appreciate that. Business small and large are closing. Most people have been negatively impacted financially.

    But here in America, we (I) do not want a Police State let alone a Police Nation where we are scrambling through the streets like Mutants under Sentinel Rule.
    [Quote Originally Posted by Thor-El 10-15-2020 12:32 PM]


    "Jason Aaron should know there is already a winner of the Phoenix Force and his name is Phoenixx9."

  14. #149
    Fantastic Member CaptainEurope's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kieran_Frost View Post
    It would be a helpful way to speed up opening the theatres. Right now the performance sector is HURTING! And can't open at half capacity, because they won't break even. The cards could help speed that up. But I agree it's a difficult situation... for all the positives, there can be some very serious negatives. I don't envy the people having to make this decision.
    I agree with this, the movie theaters, the stage theaters, the spas, the brothels are all hurting, and it's hard to tell them: "Yeah, there are thousands of people out there now who are vaccinated and could safely use your establishments and save you from bankruptcy, but we don't want to hurt any feelings."

  15. #150
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    I run a little comic book show in Kenosha WI. I just canceled the May show because I don't trust the other guys to have there vaccinations. I'll be just done with my 2nd by then so I have to think about what level I'm comfortable with to start back up.

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