Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    All-New Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Posts
    1

    Default X-men philosophies for high school

    I'm looking for a specific issue of X-Men that I can use in a lesson for my high school English class. Can anyone point me in the direction of an issue, or at least a certain storyline, that really highlights Professor X and Magneto's differing philosophies? One of the ideas behind the lesson is that human nature is shaped by education so I would love to find something where Prof X and Magneto talk about the Mutant school and how each of them feels about the next generation of mutants.

  2. #2
    Extraordinary Member BroHomo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Da Souf
    Posts
    5,997

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dumont View Post
    I'm looking for a specific issue of X-Men that I can use in a lesson for my high school English class. Can anyone point me in the direction of an issue, or at least a certain storyline, that really highlights Professor X and Magneto's differing philosophies? One of the ideas behind the lesson is that human nature is shaped by education so I would love to find something where Prof X and Magneto talk about the Mutant school and how each of them feels about the next generation of mutants.
    Might have a better chance at finding easily digestible story points if you look at the dichotomy of Emma's Hellions at the Massachusetts Academy and Prof X's New Mutants in Westchester. Plus teens would probably pay closer attention to stories involving other teens
    GrindrStone(D)

  3. #3
    Spectacular Member BESTXMAN's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    163

    Default

    Uncanny X-Men 304 has an epic philosophical conversation between magneto and xavier.

    But that was 30 years ago when their dreams were opposed. Magneto wanted to save Mutants at any cost and was isolationist since he had given up on humanity. This made him an anti-villain, which is a person who does villainous things in the pursuit of a noble cause. Whereas Xavier was inclusive and wanted mutants to help mankind and thus gain their acceptance this way. Nowadays they are both isolationist but Magneto is less hardcore than he used to be and no longer does villainous things in pursuit of mutant kinds prosperity yet he will fight anyone over it. But so will Xavier. You can also look at this same story in the more recent schism event where Cyclops took the Isolationist approach out of necessity and Wolverine, who was always borderline isolationist took the inclusive approach because he believed Cyclops had become too militant and that was their gig not the childrens. But Cyclops thought humanity was not gonna let these children grow up if they stayed with their own naive approach. This happened after many traumatic events against mutant kind like genocide of genosha, like decimation, like second coming, etc. Now Xavier has done the same as Cyclops and everyone is on the same page, even Wolverine except they are still superheroes.
    Last edited by BESTXMAN; 03-03-2021 at 09:25 PM.

  4. #4
    Fantastic Member xfire2k13's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    310

    Default

    God Loves Man Kills? (especially at the end)
    Uncanny X-men 161? (vol 1)

    This may also help: https://uncannyxmen.net/character-re...er-and-magneto

  5. #5
    Astonishing Member Lucyinthesky's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,487

    Default

    This may help:



    X-Men and philosophy : astonishing insight and uncanny argument in the mutant X-verse

    Contributors: Housel, Rebecca. ; Wisnewski, Jeremy.
    2009, Book , xii, 251 pages :

    Summary

    X-Men is one of the most popular comic book franchisesever, with successful spin-offs that include several feature films,cartoon series, bestselling video games, and merchandise. This isthe first look at the deeper issues of the X-Men universe and thechoices facing its powerful "mutants," such as identity, humanethics versus mutant morality, and self-sacrifice.

    J. Jeremy Wisnewski (Oneonta, NY) is Assistant Professor ofPhilosophy at Hartwick College and the editor of Family Guy andPhilosophy (978-1-4051-6316-3) and The Office and Philosophy(978-1-4051-7555-5). Rebecca Housel (Rochester, NY) is a professorat Rochester Institute of Technology, where she teaches aboutwriting and pop culture. For William Irwin's biography, please seebelow.
    I guess Hickman changed a lot of this but still could be worth giving it a look, it covers the comcis and the movies.
    "The time for subtlety is passing. Now is the time for change." [New Mutants (Vol. 1) #38]

  6. #6
    Fantastic Member Foon4000's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    286

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dumont View Post
    I'm looking for a specific issue of X-Men that I can use in a lesson for my high school English class. Can anyone point me in the direction of an issue, or at least a certain storyline, that really highlights Professor X and Magneto's differing philosophies? One of the ideas behind the lesson is that human nature is shaped by education so I would love to find something where Prof X and Magneto talk about the Mutant school and how each of them feels about the next generation of mutants.
    Track down 1981's Uncanny X-Men #150?
    magneto18.jpg

    Rather than a single issue, it might be worth speed-reading Uncanny X-men 200, the issues immediately after and the early New Mutants period when Magneto was the head of Xavier's.

    Not sure of the issue number, but Xavier and astral-plane Magneto had a big existential conversation before Scott and Jean's wedding.

    Magneto's had a lot of changes of heart since he was introduced, so don't try and cover everything- just focus on a limited period or a handful of issues.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •