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  1. #1
    Astonishing Member Albert1981's Avatar
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    Default SHORT STORIES that CBR recommends?

    Hello folks,

    When it comes to reading, I've mostly stuck to full-length novels. And I've really enjoyed them. But now I want to focus a little bit more of my time on SHORT STORIES. I have read the Lottery by Shirley Jackson, the Sniper by Liam O'Flaherty, and the Bet by Anton Chekhov. Those were great. But I want to read more. Are there any that people here would recommend? Right now I'm reading the Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury, and it's been so much fun. Any recommendations would be welcome.

  2. #2
    Astonishing Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    So good...:


  3. #3
    Astonishing Member Albert1981's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riv86672 View Post
    So good...:

    Thanks for the recommendation! I didn't know Neil Gaiman wrote short stories!
    Last edited by Albert1981; 03-16-2021 at 08:26 PM.

  4. #4
    Astonishing Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Albert1981 View Post
    Thanks for the recommendation! I didn't Neil Gaiman wrote short stories!
    He has this collection...



    ...which has “Snow, Glass, Apples” in it.
    Lots of good stories in there.

  5. #5
    Ultimate Member Mister Mets's Avatar
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    If you liked Chekhov, I would highly recommend Richard Pevear and Larissa Volkohnosky's translation of his short stories. They also have an excellent translation of Tolstoy with The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Short Stories.

    Quote Originally Posted by Riv86672 View Post
    He has this collection...



    ...which has “Snow, Glass, Apples” in it.
    Lots of good stories in there.
    Study in Emerald is fantastic. It's Neil Gaiman's Sherlock Holmes encountering Lovecraft mythos.
    Sincerely,
    Thomas Mets

  6. #6
    Astonishing Member Albert1981's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Riv86672 View Post
    He has this collection...



    ...which has “Snow, Glass, Apples” in it.
    Lots of good stories in there.
    Ah, sounds very magical in nature. Looks like fun! Thank you.

  7. #7
    Astonishing Member Albert1981's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mister Mets View Post
    If you liked Chekhov, I would highly recommend Richard Pevear and Larissa Volkohnosky's translation of his short stories. They also have an excellent translation of Tolstoy with The Death of Ivan Ilyich and Other Short Stories.



    Study in Emerald is fantastic. It's Neil Gaiman's Sherlock Holmes encountering Lovecraft mythos.
    I can't believe Gaiman married the two together. How unconventional and unique. Thank you so much for the recommendation there. Sadly, my experience with Chekhov is limited to the Bet. I know he was a wonderful playwright though. Your suggestions appear very interesting!

  8. #8
    CBR's Good Fairy Kieran_Frost's Avatar
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    I'm a huge, huge fan of short stories. Because of plays, I find reading books quite a burden. But short stories work for me:
    - the Circus in Winter by Kathy Day. A collection of interlocking short stories set around historically real photos about a circus in the late 19th century. Each one unique and enthralling.
    - after the quake by Murakami. 8 short stories intertwined with the overall theme of the Kobe earthquake, where the fantastic and magical gets that little more real with each story.
    - anything by M.R. James. The grandfather of ghost-stories. All chillingly wonderful.
    "We are Shakespeare. We are Michelangelo. We are Tchaikovsky. We are Turing. We are Mercury. We are Wilde. We are Lincoln, Lorca, Leonardo da Vinci. We are Alexander the Great. We are Fredrick the Great. We are Rustin. We are Addams. We are Marsha! Marsha Marsha Marsha! We so generous, we DeGeneres. We are Ziggy Stardust hooked to the silver screen. Controversially we are Malcolm X. We are Plato. We are Aristotle. We are RuPaul, god dammit! And yes, we are Woolf."

  9. #9
    Astonishing Member kjn's Avatar
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    There is a semi-established subgenre of Lovecraftian Sherlock Holmes stories, though I readily admit that most of them are not written by writers of Gaiman's calibre.

    Anyway, most of this will have a slant towards sf and fantasy, because that is the genre I know best.

    The Hugo and Nebula awards generally list works of good to very high quality, and can be a good source to explore both old and recent sf and fantasy. This is especially interesting because a win there gives a rather high chance of the story remaining in print via anthologies. Some excellent short-story writers are Michael Swanwick, Lucius Sheperd, Charles de Lint, Theodore Sturgeon, Tanith Lee, James Tiptree jr (a pseudonym for Alice Sheldon). Among current writers you have names like Naomi Kritzer, NK Jemisin, and Ursula Vernon. If you're on the lookout for the short-short type of stories, I can recommend Robert Sheckley, together with the already mentioned Michael Swanwick.

    If you haven't read Tim O'Brien, he is excellent.
    «Speaking generally, it is because of the desire of the tragic poets for the marvellous that so varied and inconsistent an account of Medea has been given out» (Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History [4.56.1])

  10. #10
    Astonishing Member Albert1981's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kieran_Frost View Post
    I'm a huge, huge fan of short stories. Because of plays, I find reading books quite a burden. But short stories work for me:
    - the Circus in Winter by Kathy Day. A collection of interlocking short stories set around historically real photos about a circus in the late 19th century. Each one unique and enthralling.
    - after the quake by Murakami. 8 short stories intertwined with the overall theme of the Kobe earthquake, where the fantastic and magical gets that little more real with each story.
    - anything by M.R. James. The grandfather of ghost-stories. All chillingly wonderful.
    I'm interested in your recommendations. Very contemporary!

  11. #11
    Astonishing Member Albert1981's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kjn View Post
    There is a semi-established subgenre of Lovecraftian Sherlock Holmes stories, though I readily admit that most of them are not written by writers of Gaiman's calibre.

    Anyway, most of this will have a slant towards sf and fantasy, because that is the genre I know best.

    The Hugo and Nebula awards generally list works of good to very high quality, and can be a good source to explore both old and recent sf and fantasy. This is especially interesting because a win there gives a rather high chance of the story remaining in print via anthologies. Some excellent short-story writers are Michael Swanwick, Lucius Sheperd, Charles de Lint, Theodore Sturgeon, Tanith Lee, James Tiptree jr (a pseudonym for Alice Sheldon). Among current writers you have names like Naomi Kritzer, NK Jemisin, and Ursula Vernon. If you're on the lookout for the short-short type of stories, I can recommend Robert Sheckley, together with the already mentioned Michael Swanwick.

    If you haven't read Tim O'Brien, he is excellent.
    Oh yes, I appreciate the Hugo and Nebula awards references and your suggestions! They are most helpful.

  12. #12
    Astonishing Member Albert1981's Avatar
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    Just finished the Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury. Some of the best literature I have ever read. The Rocket Man is such a poignant, moving story.

  13. #13
    Invincible Member numberthirty's Avatar
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    While you are going to have to be able to accept Brown's style, some of the stuff in the collection Facing The Music is pretty solid.

    "Kubuku Rides" and "Leaving Town" stick out in my memory.

  14. #14
    Astonishing Member Albert1981's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by numberthirty View Post
    While you are going to have to be able to accept Brown's style, some of the stuff in the collection Facing The Music is pretty solid.

    "Kubuku Rides" and "Leaving Town" stick out in my memory.
    Thank you so much for the recommendations. I didn't know about Brown's debut here. I heard this work was particularly well-received. Will take a look!

  15. #15
    Astonishing Member Albert1981's Avatar
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    Just wanted to let folks know that PBS will be airing a documentary on noted American short story author Flannery O'Connor from 8:00 PM to 9:30 PM. Looks interesting!

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