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  1. #31
    Uncanny King-Kamalu lemonpeace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. D. Guy View Post
    Over my time over the internet, I've heard contradictory things about this. From what I can recollect, it is those who don't speak fluent English who are more likely to pepper Spanish/whatever their first language is into their English speech.
    I can see that but in my experience (again, I can't speak to the experience of the latino/hispanic community as a whole) it's usually a matter of them not knowing the english word and asking how to say the Spanish word in English. but hey, maybe I've hung around some odd Hispanics, iunno. as I said up top, maybe I'm just sensitive to it because it was a trope I hadn't realize it until my Hispanic friends point out how unnaturally it's used in media. I have no issue throwing in another language into the story to illustrate that the character is of a particular culture but there are better, less jarringly cringe, ways of showcasing that a character's bilingual. especially here where the language aspect can be side-stepped entirely if they don't know or aren't confident in what they're doing.
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  2. #32
    Mighty Member Jody Garland's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bored at 3:00AM View Post

    Sorry, Nerd Brain gonna Nerd Brain. It's a sickness.

    I can't believe I can remember all this useless detail, but I still can't remember the Chinese word for "door".
    Don't apologize when that's what I was doing in the first place! Good to know more of the relevant backstory, especially since this run looks to be continuity-driven, what with the Starheart and Mosaic getting referenced.

  3. #33
    Fantastic Member ERON's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. D. Guy View Post
    Over my time over the internet, I've heard contradictory things about this. From what I can recollect, it is those who don't speak fluent English who are more likely to pepper Spanish/whatever their first language is into their English speech.
    At the high school where I teach, I have a lot of native Spanish speakers in my classes, and they do occasionally throw in Spanish words when speaking English - usually high-frequency words like "tambien" ("too" or "also") or interjections like "a la madre" (a mild swear) - but for the most part, they tend to stick to one language or the other.

    But on the other hand, I have a lot of German speakers in my family, and they do tend to switch from English to German on the fly, sometimes in mid sentence even.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by lemonpeace View Post
    I can see that but in my experience (again, I can't speak to the experience of the latino/hispanic community as a whole) it's usually a matter of them not knowing the english word and asking how to say the Spanish word in English. but hey, maybe I've hung around some odd Hispanics, iunno. as I said up top, maybe I'm just sensitive to it because it was a trope I hadn't realize it until my Hispanic friends point out how unnaturally it's used in media. I have no issue throwing in another language into the story to illustrate that the character is of a particular culture but there are better, less jarringly cringe, ways of showcasing that a character's bilingual. especially here where the language aspect can be side-stepped entirely if they don't know or aren't confident in what they're doing.
    Quote Originally Posted by ERON View Post
    At the high school where I teach, I have a lot of native Spanish speakers in my classes, and they do occasionally throw in Spanish words when speaking English - usually high-frequency words like "tambien" ("too" or "also") or interjections like "a la madre" (a mild swear) - but for the most part, they tend to stick to one language or the other.

    But on the other hand, I have a lot of German speakers in my family, and they do tend to switch from English to German on the fly, sometimes in mid sentence even.
    This is pretty fascinating! It's interesting to see/hear/read and learn about how different people adapt to similar or the same circumstances differently.

    Going from my post, ERON, how fluent are/were the native Spanish-speakers in your class with English?
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  5. #35
    Fantastic Member ERON's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J. D. Guy View Post
    This is pretty fascinating! It's interesting to see/hear/read and learn about how different people adapt to similar or the same circumstances differently.

    Going from my post, ERON, how fluent are/were the native Spanish-speakers in your class with English?
    It's a mixed bag. Some know just enough English to get by, while others are virtually indistinguishable from native English speakers, with most falling somewhere in between those two extremes. In years past, I've even had a few who needed translators in the classroom with them.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by ERON View Post
    It's a mixed bag. Some know just enough English to get by, while others are virtually indistinguishable from native English speakers, with most falling somewhere in between those two extremes. In years past, I've even had a few who needed translators in the classroom with them.
    Ah, okay.

    Thank you for elaborating.
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  7. #37
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    The highest compliment i can pay to Mr. Thorne is that Green Lantern #1 was worth the money i paid for it.

    I didn't finish the title skeptical of how the John Stewart would be depicted nor of the quality of writing. That's something i absolutely do not take for granted as a long time reader and as someone that pays attention to the business of entertainment media and associated product.

    If DC or Mr. Thorne specifically values financial support of their product / his written work he has earned it hands down. I'm going to keep paying for the product because this is what i want to see in the comics i purchase. DC needs to pay attention.



    Positive take away:
    -competent writing that wasn't culturally pandering nor condescending
    - high level art. Specifically plenty of border line "God Shots" of John. That matters if my main draw to the comic is John Stewart.
    - feats / action

    It isn't hard to have a successful comic if 2 of the 3 above are provided consistently *looks at the Space Ghost I.P.* .



    Negative take away:

    - The teen. Ehhhhhhhhhh..... I've learned long ago that using annoying children within a story is a device so i'll over look it for now. Let's hope she turns out to be as riveting as Gabi Braun.
    Don't complain. Create.

  8. #38
    Uncanny King-Kamalu lemonpeace's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Customizer View Post
    [....] Let's hope she turns out to be as riveting as Gabi Braun.


    we GBk over here sir
    Last edited by lemonpeace; 04-08-2021 at 08:23 PM.
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  9. #39
    Astonishing Member Sodam Yat's Avatar
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    This was an excellent issue. The writer seems pretty knowledgeable with the Green Lantern mythos. Usually some writers may have some very limited knowledge on franchise history. But Redjack seems to understand core concepts of Green Lantern. By him understanding that, he understands the dedicated Green Lantern readers. So that's a bonus. The art by both artists is terrific. I love how he writes John and showing him thinking critically on coming up with a solution. Commanding the Green Lantern Corps to power down takes a lot of responsibility. I'm glad we get to see why he's the best fit for that role.

    I'm also more curious about this source of peace that was created by the guardians

  10. #40
    It sucks to be right BohemiaDrinker's Avatar
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    Okay, here are my thoughts on the first issue.

    First, I had to re-read it. This is a good sign because usually I only re-read stuff like Morrison or Hickman before making a judgement. It means that this book packs a lot. First read I didn't like as much: it felt like Geoffrey Thorne (and since you do post on this boards sir, how do you prefer to be referred to? Geoffrey? Mr. Thorne? Redjack?) tried to solve every perceived problem with the GL franchise in the first issue. Then I thought about it some, and that's not a valid complaint; in fact it's exactly what I asked for. S I re-read it, realized I missed a bunch of stuff, and really, really liked this. There's too much for plain text so I'll try to make topics:

    • Characterization: Usually, character work is relegated to the second plane when a book has so many concepts as this one. Not here: there's great, and very subtle character work on this issue. From Jordan meaning well and treating John like an equal, but being sort of clueless about his mindset, to John and Simon's sort of shorthand, as if they know where the other stands, to Kelli's attitude, to John's introspective, almost strategic positioning in this world, these characters felt very real to me. The Guardian's self analysis was a plus, as were "greasy politician" Sinestro and all the Aliens. The captain in particular, with her disdain to human languages, plays on words and all reminded of that Thanagar issue of Morrison Animal-Man, she just portrays the "War-minded people which, yet, views everyone else as backward barbarians" so well. (The whole Jordan-John-Simon thing stuck with me, though. Seems like life, with so little dialogue)

    • Concepts: As someone used to play encyclopedia, there's a lot in this book. Lots of references, lots of moving parts, lots of shit I don't recognize - which is great since it doesn't happen often. Feels like everything GL was thrown into the mix, and my favorite hasn’t even showed up yet. (It’s Jo. I’m older reader, but I prefer new stuff.).

    • World Building: this felt like ASOIAF in space. I like ASOIAF very much, but I don’t like medieval fantasy, and I do like space. So, yeah!

    On top of that, the art was just beautiful. I believe that this book has potential. If it lasts enough - and I hope it does - it may become one of those things like Mark Waid’s Flash, which has to be referenced going forward whether the authors want it or not. It may be the book to finally elevate John among comic book audiences. I’m impressed, really.

    Count on me for the ride.
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  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rakzo View Post
    I'm going to ask this right away: Shouldn't this book be called Green Lantern Corps?

    Because that's pretty much what it is.

    Mind you, that's one of the few weird decisions in an otherwise solid first entry.

    Geoffrey Thorne who also handled the main sections of the Future State: Green Lantern title, is in charge of launching this new volume and he continues the same vibe as in that series. John Stewart continues to be the main character and, just like in Robert Venditti's run, he remains as leader of the Corps which has always been cool in my book since I believe John is the most capable for that role of all the Earth Lanterns, plus, Thorne gets his character fine showing how competent he is at leading the whole team and dealing with the new political course that his group has been assigned to.

    The rest of the cast also get decent moments. Unlike Brian Bendis, Thorne at the very least tries to justify very hard Teen Lantern's place on the team but unfortunately has to follow the same one-note portrayal that Bendis created along with adding some really irritating Spanglish lines that are not even properly written (again, people who don't know Spanish should really stop trying to write in Spanish). Simon and Guy get adequate scenes based on their previous portrayals in comparison.

    The plot is really intriguing so far due that it handles yet another Bendis' plot-point like the United Planets but in a more compelling manner with the Corps acting like ambassadors and controlling possible attacks that could disrupt the peace they're fighting for and the writer creates good solutions that go along with that mentality. There's also a nice amount of content in this chapter compared to other opening issues.

    Not so fond of the appearance of a Thanagarian woman that look suspiciously similar as Shayera Hol from the Justice League Animated series since it seems like Thorne might want to replicate the romance between John and her but who knows? Maybe he will bring some surprises about it.

    Dexter Soy does a fantastic job in pencils with a vibrant style and precise storytelling. Marco Santucci's work on the other hand, is just fine, not bad but not that impressive and doesn't contribute a lot to the story.

    Promising beginning. Let's see how things go on.
    I really REALLY enjoyed this first issue....and it's story foundations and world building is superb!!!

    Mr. G. Thorne brilliantly hammered it home. This is definitely a must read monthly.

    Finally the GLC and United Planets in the same story....and how Brilliant GL John deduced how to defeat that all consuming 'beast' which seemed almost unbeatable.

    Can't wait to read future issues.

    Glad to see some of the RLs but it would be nice to a group of United spectrum corps to protect the various parts of the United Planets as well as being the centre group to police inter-corp wars and/or rivlaries.

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