Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 64
  1. #46
    Father Son Kamehameha < Kuwagaton's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    8,095

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SiegePerilous02 View Post
    They've stuck around, but have also been criticized as being a ripoff of the Hulk and Ross.

    And are either of those things big selling points for readers?
    Thunderbolt Lane is a pretty modern thing. It's as accurate to call it a New 52 thing as it is to call it "post Crisis."
    Welcome or welcome back! Please check out the updated
    CBR Community STANDARDS & RULES

  2. #47
    Astonishing Member HsssH's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    4,402

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DochaDocha View Post
    Okay, my memory is fuzzy here, but did the dialogue indicate it didn't happen, or did the dialogue indicate that they hoped nothing happened?
    Didn't Darkseid show some tapes to Miracle before all that? From my understanding implication was that Barda had done it with others before we got whole scene with Superman.

  3. #48
    Phantom Zone Escapee manofsteel1979's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Planet Houston
    Posts
    5,258

    Default

    Not that the writters weren't solid,but I'd echo others here in that the editorial team over the late 90s (Mike Carlin and Joey Calveri) were highly competent editors who were collaborative with their writers. I'd even put Eddie Berganza's early run with Jeph Loeb and Joe Kelly in that category up until around "Our Worlds At War."
    When it comes to comics,one person's "fan-service" is another persons personal cannon. So by definition it's ALL fan service. Aren't we ALL fans?
    SUPERMAN is the greatest fictional character ever created.

  4. #49
    (formerly "Superman") JAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    iowa
    Posts
    2,061

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by manofsteel1979 View Post
    Not that the writters weren't solid,but I'd echo others here in that the editorial team over the late 90s (Mike Carlin and Joey Calveri) were highly competent editors who were collaborative with their writers. I'd even put Eddie Berganza's early run with Jeph Loeb and Joe Kelly in that category up until around "Our Worlds At War."
    That's the draw for me, too.

    Individually, maybe they aren't "better" - but all of them as a team, frankly... they're still the best, imo.
    Hear my new CD "Love The World Away", available on iTunes, Google Music, Spotify, Shazam, and Amazon: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B01N5XYV..._waESybX1C0RXK via @amazon
    www.jamiekelleymusic.com
    TV interview here: https://snjtoday.com/snj-today-hotline-jamie-kelley/

  5. #50
    Astonishing Member Adekis's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,577

    Default

    I don't know if I think the post-Crisis writers and arcs and storylines were better, but those teams were phenomenal at balancing

    I don't always think their version of Clark/Superman himself is the best, frankly. It got better as time went on, but there's a while there where I'm going "jeez, can he please be a little smarter, more competent, more progressive?" But that balance of the expanded cast of Metropolis, its aesthetic, the Planet, including several of the characters' professional lives, with the science fiction action adventures of Superman, is undeniably a highwater mark for the franchise!

    Plus the Simonson and Bogdanove team is definitely in my top five favorite writer / artist collaborators in the history of the character!

    Maybe top three, heck.
    WHEN YOU DON'T VOTE, IT ISN'T REBELLION, IT'S SURRENDER!

    "You know the deal, Metropolis. Treat people right or expect a visit from me."

  6. #51
    Standing Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    15,197

    Default

    I think the 1970s had quite the expanded cast, too. If they could just take the cast from the 1970s and the cast from the 1990s and combine them (eliminating some of the duplications), then that would be a fine Metropolis.
    🇨🇦
    [Exit, pursued
    by a bear.

  7. #52
    (formerly "Superman") JAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    iowa
    Posts
    2,061

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Adekis View Post
    I don't know if I think the post-Crisis writers and arcs and storylines were better, but those teams were phenomenal at balancing

    I don't always think their version of Clark/Superman himself is the best, frankly. It got better as time went on, but there's a while there where I'm going "jeez, can he please be a little smarter, more competent, more progressive?" But that balance of the expanded cast of Metropolis, its aesthetic, the Planet, including several of the characters' professional lives, with the science fiction action adventures of Superman, is undeniably a highwater mark for the franchise!

    Plus the Simonson and Bogdanove team is definitely in my top five favorite writer / artist collaborators in the history of the character!

    Maybe top three, heck.
    Definitely! For me, it depends on what part of Post-Crisis we're talking - usually, when I think of it, I think more about the Triangle Era than the initial Post-Crisis time, itself.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Kelly View Post
    I think the 1970s had quite the expanded cast, too. If they could just take the cast from the 1970s and the cast from the 1990s and combine them (eliminating some of the duplications), then that would be a fine Metropolis.
    I think that was kinda the idea that Johns had in "Secret Origin," to be honest. Not a great execution, but that certainly seemed to be the plan.
    Hear my new CD "Love The World Away", available on iTunes, Google Music, Spotify, Shazam, and Amazon: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B01N5XYV..._waESybX1C0RXK via @amazon
    www.jamiekelleymusic.com
    TV interview here: https://snjtoday.com/snj-today-hotline-jamie-kelley/

  8. #53
    Spectacular Member The Frog Bros's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    214

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JAK View Post
    Definitely! For me, it depends on what part of Post-Crisis we're talking - usually, when I think of it, I think more about the Triangle Era than the initial Post-Crisis time, itself.



    I think that was kinda the idea that Johns had in "Secret Origin," to be honest. Not a great execution, but that certainly seemed to be the plan.
    Yeah, haven't re-read SO in a bit but I recall my initial thoughts on first reading were that it read like a greatest hits album. Not necessarily completely bad per se, but taking bits and pieces from various stories def made it feel like it lacked a cohesive or unique take of its own. Trying to please everybody by including multiple interpretations, it ended up a bit stale and boring.

    But hey, on the other hand, some people like greatest hits albums so that's cool too
    "There is nothing quite so perfect as the exact way in which comics combine the word and image." --Alan Moore
    "Before it was a Bomb, the Bomb was an Idea. Superman, however, was a Faster, Stronger, Better Idea." --Grant Morrison

  9. #54
    Standing Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    15,197

    Default

    I don't remember that from SECRET ORIGIN (but I wasn't able to find all the issues at my local shop at the time, so), but I do remember, I think, seeing Steve Lombard in the ACTION COMICS run. That got me excited, not much came of that. And as always with Geoff Johns, he chose to ignore what other writers had done with the character. Steve was supposed to be like Broadway Joe Namath, a guy who had been a great football quarterback who then became a sportscaster. The Johns Lombard didn't seem like he'd ever been a great athlete, or had the heroic nature of Steve Lombard. Yes, Lombard was a jerk, but he had other admirable qualities. And I believe the Johns version was balding.

    Were there other characters from 1970s Metropolis--Clark's neighbours, people he knew in the city, co-workers, T.V. personalities--that Johns used? Or people from Smallville?
    🇨🇦
    [Exit, pursued
    by a bear.

  10. #55
    (formerly "Superman") JAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    iowa
    Posts
    2,061

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by The Frog Bros View Post
    Yeah, haven't re-read SO in a bit but I recall my initial thoughts on first reading were that it read like a greatest hits album. Not necessarily completely bad per se, but taking bits and pieces from various stories def made it feel like it lacked a cohesive or unique take of its own. Trying to please everybody by including multiple interpretations, it ended up a bit stale and boring.

    But hey, on the other hand, some people like greatest hits albums so that's cool too
    Oh, certainly - I remember it being an ok read, but more serving as a basic blueprint for just about anything to fit into. Which, as that, it does do pretty well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Kelly View Post
    I don't remember that from SECRET ORIGIN (but I wasn't able to find all the issues at my local shop at the time, so), but I do remember, I think, seeing Steve Lombard in the ACTION COMICS run. That got me excited, not much came of that. And as always with Geoff Johns, he chose to ignore what other writers had done with the character. Steve was supposed to be like Broadway Joe Namath, a guy who had been a great football quarterback who then became a sportscaster. The Johns Lombard didn't seem like he'd ever been a great athlete, or had the heroic nature of Steve Lombard. Yes, Lombard was a jerk, but he had other admirable qualities. And I believe the Johns version was balding.

    Were there other characters from 1970s Metropolis--Clark's neighbours, people he knew in the city, co-workers, T.V. personalities--that Johns used? Or people from Smallville?
    Yeah, that was (at the time) surprising to me. Johns only picked Steve and I think one or two others - and then misread half of him. But that's kind of a pattern; for all the hype he'd built around himself as a guy who could bring Pre-Crisis and Post-Crisis together, he did the same to Superboy Prime and a lot of other characters he's touched. A cursory read (and also misread) of a character, taking the bare graft of what he remembered and running with it. Plus, Lombard being a hollow jerk makes it easier for Johns to put Clark in his favorite characterization - namely the Donnerverse one.

    I do still think the overall idea of SO was solid as a concept, but I'd also like to see a more nuanced version of it that does a better job of giving all the characters three dimensions.
    Hear my new CD "Love The World Away", available on iTunes, Google Music, Spotify, Shazam, and Amazon: https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B01N5XYV..._waESybX1C0RXK via @amazon
    www.jamiekelleymusic.com
    TV interview here: https://snjtoday.com/snj-today-hotline-jamie-kelley/

  11. #56
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    90

    Default

    Ive mostly been reading post crisis comics and to be honest i've thoroughly enjoyed them. I have however kept clear of silver age material due to how ridiculously powerful he was back then, but i'f actually like to experience how he was back then when he was written at his best as far as that point in time, so any silver age recommendations guys?

  12. #57
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dralokonda View Post
    Ive mostly been reading post crisis comics and to be honest i've thoroughly enjoyed them. I have however kept clear of silver age material due to how ridiculously powerful he was back then, but i'f actually like to experience how he was back then when he was written at his best as far as that point in time, so any silver age recommendations guys?
    Hmmm, I canít recommend anything specific off the top of my head, but expect something completely different from if youíre used to reading post-Crisis serialized stories. Silver Age stories are usually one-and-done and I just tend to randomly pick stuff. Hereís a playlist of some Silver Age stories though:

    https://youtube.com/playlist?list=PL...zRkqxGFJD-Y8q2

    And I donít think you need to be put-off by Silver Age Clarkís power levels as they arenít meant to be quantified; Silver Age Supes is wild, whimsical, fantastical wish fulfillment for kids and powers get made up to service a story. He can shoot mini-versions of himself from his hands, blow away a solar system by sneezing at it, and create rainbow sculptures out of clouds. Also heís a bit of a jerk but I like that he just has fun with his powers rather than feels burdened by them. The Willy Wonka of Superman, if you will. And also a totally different guy from Post-Crisis Supes. If you like the sound of that youíll like the Silver Age!

  13. #58
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    90

    Default

    That sounds alot like the stuff anti superman fans say that makes superman appear as a mary sue character, but i'll have a look nonetheless, thankyou

  14. #59
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Posts
    89

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dralokonda View Post
    That sounds alot like the stuff anti superman fans say that makes superman appear as a mary sue character, but i'll have a look nonetheless, thankyou
    Heh, then I’ll say they have no sense of wonder or fun

    Though I wouldn’t say Silver Age Supes is a Mary Sue because again, the power levels aren’t the point for that era. Think of SA stories as...fairytales, instead of Greek myths. They operate on their own whimsical logic. But with superheroes. Plus SA Supes is more of a chaotic prankster character than a moral, god-like one.

    But I’m arguing with what some antis might have said or not said so I’ll just leave it there haha

  15. #60
    Ultimate Member SiegePerilous02's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    12,847

    Default

    The Silver Age comics were more like a demented sitcom with a neurotic God-like alien prankster as the star. In which case power levels aren't really an issue because they weren't used for the standard conflicts we have now.

    I'd say Bronze Age Superman is a satisfying mix between the two eras; he's more toned down than the SA version but still has all of that lore attached to him, plus some of the characterizations. Just more mature. Go to Pre-Crisis stories from that era are usually Alan Moore's stories and Elliot Maggin's, including "Must there be a Superman?," "Who took the super out of Superman?" and his two novels.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •