View Poll Results: Do 3D Models In Comics Bother You?

Voters
7. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    1 14.29%
  • No

    4 57.14%
  • Depends on how well they're used.

    2 28.57%
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Astonishing Member Timothy Hunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Underneath the Brooklyn Bridge
    Posts
    2,055

    Default Do Artists Using 3D Models In Comics Bother You?

    For the past couple decades, it has been commonplace for artists to use programs such as Google Sketchup for assistance on background and even characters in comics.

  2. #2

    Default

    I see it a lot in webcomics and mangas. I don't mind it because it makes it easier and less stressful for artists to do their jobs ¯\_(ツ)_/¯. Sometimes the story is so good I forget to notice the artist is tracing over 3d models or photographs for backgrounds.
    december 21st has passed where are my superpowers?

  3. #3
    Incredible Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    http://classiccomics.org
    Posts
    840

    Default

    Can someone post examples of work done with and without 3D models, so we can see what the difference is?
    --
    The discussion forum for fans of 20th-century comics: http://classiccomics.org

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Allen View Post
    Can someone post examples of work done with and without 3D models, so we can see what the difference is?
    Art with 3d models:


    december 21st has passed where are my superpowers?

  5. #5
    Astonishing Member CSTowle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    4,072

    Default

    Eh, tell me a good story using words and pictures and I'm not going to care much how you do it. In movies CGI doesn't register as live-action in my brain, so any scene that involves it (like Black Widow and the helicopter scene) just looks like a human interacting with a cartoon and has the same emotional impact as a cartoon for me. But other than that, don't much care. In comics I expect most actions to be artificial, regardless of whether they're drawn/painted or computer-generated. Live pictures interacting does bump me, though (like some Kirby stuff, or the occasional appearance of a human's photo in comics).
    Formerly finfangfool

  6. #6
    Astonishing Member MRP's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    3,612

    Default

    "Never draw what you can swipe. Never swipe what you can trace. Never trace what you can photocopy. Never photocopy what you can clip out and paste down"
    -Wally Wood

    It's just another step in a long legacy of comic artists using whatever material is available (from lightboxes, photo-references and files of stock poses to now online tools and computer modeling) to make the work easier and quicker. It's been done by the best in the business and the worst, since folks started making comics, so no it doesn't bother me.

    -M
    Comic fans get the comics their buying habits deserve.

  7. #7
    Astonishing Member Zelena's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    3,239

    Default

    The important part is the result… Does it show? Is it a problem?

    In the first example, I had to search the character in the scenery. In the second example, it looks like a photomontage. It’s true that I saw more homogeneous comic panels made by artists… who had probably more time to make their work.

    Anyway, it’s hard to judge a panel separately from the others… How many time would a reader stay on the panel in a normal reading? Hardly more a second.

  8. #8
    Ultimate Member Kirby101's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    14,966

    Default

    I don't mind, but it often feels more lifeless.
    There came a time when the Old Gods died! The Brave died with the Cunning! The Noble perished locked in battle with unleashed Evil! It was the last day for them! An ancient era was passing in fiery holocaust!

  9. #9
    Standing Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    15,608

    Default

    This is an "Art in current comic books" subject. Like with other current comic art, those examples are too crowded. It's about subtraction--taking away the details that overstuff the image and bringing out the details that are most important to the story.

    And as I learned from an old Superman comic, when some crooks had abducted an artist, he explained you can't just trace from a photograph. Because then the image looks wrong to us--you have to pull perspective to make it look right. Jimmy Stewart would get vertigo from looking at those cityscapes. It's not enough that all the lines meet at a vanishing point. The background is still pushing forward into the foreground. To fool the eye--the lines in the foreground have to be stronger to indicate that's closest to your eye. While the background detail needs to be lessened, so it looks further away. Even then, there should be some forced perspective to create a more dynamic panel.
    Say it's only an Opti-Screen show
    The kind they watch on Thraxx T.V.

  10. #10
    Astonishing Member Zelena's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    3,239

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Kelly View Post
    And as I learned from an old Superman comic, when some crooks had abducted an artist, he explained you can't just trace from a photograph. Because then the image looks wrong to us--you have to pull perspective to make it look right. Jimmy Stewart would get vertigo from looking at those cityscapes. It's not enough that all the lines meet at a vanishing point. The background is still pushing forward into the foreground. To fool the eye--the lines in the foreground have to be stronger to indicate that's closest to your eye. While the background detail needs to be lessened, so it looks further away. Even then, there should be some forced perspective to create a more dynamic panel.
    It’s true that a well-crafted work needs that every line must be what Benoît Peeters has called a “significant line”: when artists draw, they put everything in order to contribute to a meaning like the hierarchy of elements, the level of details… “Photographic lines” are not the result of an idea, a human goal.

    But between an artist work and a laborer work, there’s no comparison.


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •