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  1. #16
    Ultimate Member Lee Stone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adekis View Post
    I thought he was magenta.
    That would be Frances Kane.
    "There's magic in the sound of analog audio." - CNET.

  2. #17
    Extraordinary Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Stone View Post
    That would be Frances Kane.
    ^^^Good one!

    When I was a kid I pronounced her name as Magneta. I just never realized it was the color.

  3. #18
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    I assumed Frances Kane had a mild form of dyslexia--like my typing fingers or like Michael Scott who is NOT the father of Astird Levinson. She meant it to be Magneta, but spelled it Magenta. Like all those that write rogue when they mean rouge and rouge when they mean rogue. And this was hell for my fingers to type.
    Never desert Alex Désert when he's eating sugary sweet dessert in the sandy desert!

  4. #19
    Traveler of omniverses Thor-Ul's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MajorHoy View Post
    But should we really judge a character by the color of their skin?
    No, we should judge them by the number of their eyes.
    Because, remember, Despero is part of an oppresed minority in his homeworld, where three eye people is ostracized from society. Those bigots.
    "But it's the fool who ponders on "what ifs" and "might have beens" for overly long?"
    Richard Swift (The Shade #11).

  5. #20
    Incredible Member joebleau's Avatar
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    depend how much sun he had at the beach

  6. #21
    Extraordinary Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thor-Ul View Post
    No, we should judge them by the number of their eyes.
    Because, remember, Despero is part of an oppresed minority in his homeworld, where three eye people is ostracized from society. Those bigots.
    It’s like that old saying, “two heads are better than one, but three eyes are kinda weird”.

  7. #22
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    If stereoscopic vision creates a three dimensional perspective, does trioscopic vision allow Despero to see all four dimensions?
    Never desert Alex Désert when he's eating sugary sweet dessert in the sandy desert!

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Kelly View Post
    If stereoscopic vision creates a three dimensional perspective, does trioscopic vision allow Despero to see all four dimensions?
    Nah, that's Tuatara's power, and they literally said that in his introduction in the Superfriends comic, that 'just like you have two eyes and can see in three dimensions, with my third eye I can see into the fourth dimension, which is time!'

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sutekh View Post
    Nah, that's Tuatara's power, and they literally said that in his introduction in the Superfriends comic, that 'just like you have two eyes and can see in three dimensions, with my third eye I can see into the fourth dimension, which is time!'
    I'm surprised that I stumbled on something that actually happened. I must have read that comic, but I have no conscious memory of it.
    Never desert Alex Désert when he's eating sugary sweet dessert in the sandy desert!

  10. #25
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    It’s Pink, and there is also a different design when he wear uniform

  11. #26
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    But for the purposes of helping the o.p., the colours you're using to build an image are the three plus black (or what some call Ketone) "CMYK' which is all there is (unless there's an added Pantone, such as gold).



    If you're using a regular home printer, or a computer imaging program, you're working with CMYK files--so to build your image, you have to know those basic colours, which then form all the other colours by overlaying the four onto each other in different ratios.

    See THE DC COMICS GUIDE TO COLORING AND LETTERING COMICS (2004), by Mark Chiarello and Todd Klein, for a comprehensive understanding of how these comics were and are coloured and lettered. It's the world's finest book on the subject.
    Never desert Alex Désert when he's eating sugary sweet dessert in the sandy desert!

  12. #27
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    And just to add more information--because this is a subject that fascinates me--when you're looking at a computer screen, you're not seeing the colours as they will come out on a print job. Because computers use red, green and blue light--plus white. Black is an absence of light, so it's actually the white that is the fourth colour being projected into your eye. This is why print jobs can come out wrong--because you're seeing one image on the screen, but how that comes out in the printing may not be the same.

    In fact, human beings only see three colours--red, green and blue (plus darkness/lightness). Our brains translate the information to construct all the other colours. If they see a combination of green and red, then the brain concludes it must be yellow. But sometimes the brain can get fooled into thinking it's one colour when it's another.

    On top of that colour seems to be a linguistic construct. People in the past didn't see all the colours we see now, because their language didn't allow for other colours. If I recall correctly, the colour we first had a word for was blue--so if we saw green, that was also blue to us. Other colours like orange, pink and brown are late arrivals. Pink is just red but not as much saturation. Orange was seen to be red, before the word for orange was invented. Brown isn't an actual colour. You make brown by taking orange and adding a bit of black to it. So brown is really a shade of orange, just like pink is a shade of red. Blue is just blue--there are different shades of blue but they are all blue to us.
    Never desert Alex Désert when he's eating sugary sweet dessert in the sandy desert!

  13. #28
    Extraordinary Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Thank you, Jim Kelly; you went above and beyond and it’s appreciated.

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Kelly View Post
    On top of that colour seems to be a linguistic construct. People in the past didn't see all the colours we see now, because their language didn't allow for other colours.
    I had just read recently that the ancient Greeks didn't have a word for 'blue,' and tended to refer in their stories to the 'wine-dark sea' or the 'brazen sky' since they saw the sky as 'shiny' or 'bright' like brass or bronze, and so it was the same to them, even though shiny brass looks nothing like the blue sky to us, but to them it was 'bright' which was close enough.

    Plus blue is sort of a freak in nature. Air isn't blue, but the sky looks blue. Water isn't blue, but the sea can look blue. Bluebirds and jays have exactly zero blue pigment, their apparent blue coloration is an optical illusion due to the design of their feathers.

    The blue is a lie.

  15. #30
    Extraordinary Member Riv86672's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sutekh View Post
    I had just read recently that the ancient Greeks didn't have a word for 'blue,' and tended to refer in their stories to the 'wine-dark sea' or the 'brazen sky' since they saw the sky as 'shiny' or 'bright' like brass or bronze, and so it was the same to them, even though shiny brass looks nothing like the blue sky to us, but to them it was 'bright' which was close enough.

    Plus blue is sort of a freak in nature. Air isn't blue, but the sky looks blue. Water isn't blue, but the sea can look blue. Bluebirds and jays have exactly zero blue pigment, their apparent blue coloration is an optical illusion due to the design of their feathers.

    The blue is a lie.
    You just sent me down the rabbit hole that is Google.

    And I liked it.

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