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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ERON View Post
    You asked why the term "strike" is used to mean the organized withdrawal of labor. That's the answer. The term "strike" is used to mean the organized withdrawal of labor because of that incident almost 300 years ago where the sailors "struck" the sails of the ships in protest.
    The literal became a metaphor

  2. #32
    Invincible Member MajorHoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JackDaw View Post
    . . . The phrase “let’s ballot the members about nothing” would be met with total incomprehension!
    Not if they were acquainted with the show Seinfeld.


    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    The literal became a metaphor
    And what's a metaphor?

    It's where one lets the cows graze.

  3. #33
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MajorHoy View Post
    Not if they were acquainted with the show Seinfeld.
    Lol. (But actually..they wouldn’t have had a clue who Seinfeld was…my union activities were in the distant past, albeit less than the 300 years ago that troubles our colleague trokanmariel33)

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by MajorHoy View Post
    Not if they were acquainted with the show Seinfeld.


    And what's a metaphor?

    It's where one lets the cows graze.
    "And what's a metaphor?" - in this context, it's the . . . . . . . . . .

    I wasn't able to finish the sentence.

    If there is no prospect of attacking something, as there was almost 300 years ago, is strike an accurate or scientific depiction of truth?

  5. #35
    Invincible Member MajorHoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    . . . If there is no prospect of attacking something, as there was almost 300 years ago, is strike an accurate or scientific depiction of truth?
    All depends on which definition of the term "strike" one is using, doesn't it?

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MajorHoy View Post
    All depends on which definition of the term "strike" one is using, doesn't it?
    If strike means no labour, is strike the definition of reality all when people aren't at work?

  7. #37
    Invincible Member MajorHoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    If strike means no labour, is strike the definition of reality all when people aren't at work?
    "Strike" usually implies people choosing not to work at a time when they are suppose to be working.

  8. #38
    Astonishing Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    I'm going to guess English isn't your first language, in which case you confusion over the subtilties of meaning of common English language phrases is understandable...but it's been explained now by several native English speakers so there's no reason to argue the point anymore. You were confused, native speakers explained it...so now you move on.
    Looking for a friendly place to discuss comic books? Try The Classic Comics Forum!

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by thwhtGuardian View Post
    I'm going to guess English isn't your first language, in which case you confusion over the subtilties of meaning of common English language phrases is understandable...but it's been explained now by several native English speakers so there's no reason to argue the point anymore. You were confused, native speakers explained it...so now you move on.

    Okay, I'll move on
    Last edited by trokanmariel33; 10-20-2021 at 02:39 PM. Reason: No desire to argue

  10. #40

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    I understand if one makes a strike. However, if it takes two, shouldn't it be referred to as a spare?
    Why yes, I do enjoy hearing myself talk. it is very kind of you to notice>

  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCleghorn View Post
    I understand if one makes a strike. However, if it takes two, shouldn't it be referred to as a spare?
    I think it's called a hand shake

  12. #42
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    Okay, I'll move on
    Let’s face it…English can be a confusing language. I suppose any language can be? (Languages real area of weakness for me, admire any one who can learn more than one.)

  13. #43
    Invincible Member MajorHoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCleghorn View Post
    I understand if one makes a strike. However, if it takes two, shouldn't it be referred to as a spare?
    And you probably want us to say that three consecutive strikes is a "turkey" . . .

  14. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by MajorHoy View Post
    And you probably want us to say that three consecutive strikes is a "turkey" . . .
    Isn't that obvious? If a Union goes on strikes for three consecutive negotiations, that is a turkey. And as God is my witness, I though turkeys could fly.
    Why yes, I do enjoy hearing myself talk. it is very kind of you to notice>

  15. #45
    Invincible Member MajorHoy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptCleghorn View Post
    Isn't that obvious? If a Union goes on strikes for three consecutive negotiations, that is a turkey. And as God is my witness, I though turkeys could fly.
    Look, Herb, turkeys can fly . . . but not very well, and definitely not high in the sky.

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