Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 45
  1. #16
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2021
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Xheight View Post
    I agree as the unspoken aspect is organized or coordinated action. A person who walks off a job in a matter of conscience is following only themselves.
    I understand the second part of your reply, but, I must admit, I'm a bit confused about the first part

  2. #17
    Invincible Member MajorHoy's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    24,525

    Default

    I'm going on strike against this thread.

  3. #18
    Extraordinary Member babyblob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    New Richmond Ohio
    Posts
    5,676

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MajorHoy View Post
    I'm going on strike against this thread.
    Unless you are physically attacking this thread you are using a misappropriation of the language. And as a Major you should know better.
    Favorite teams. Alpha Flight, Avengers, Fantastic Four, West Coast Avengers, Justice Society of America, Legion of Superheroes.

  4. #19
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3,442

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    In the case of strike, the situation is never-changing. The role and application of strike is to falsely insinuate being attacked by a group of people, who are doing no such thing.
    You are completely ignoring babyblob’s point that many English words have several meanings. That is just factual. The word “set”, for example, has over 20 different meanings.

    If you look up the word “strike” in any reputable English Dictionary…say Chambers or the Oxford Dictionary…it will list “withdrawal of Labour” as one of the standard meanings.

    The Chambers 21st Century Dictionary (version published in 1999) lists no fewer than 18 different meanings for the word strike…with “hit” being the most common meaning, with “organised withdrawal of labour” being 13th listed meaning. (i.e. it’s a valid meaning but less common.)

    And it’s certainly not a “misappropriation”! (Check the phrase in any reputable English dictionary…misappropriation means theft, it does not mean “use inappropriately”.)

  5. #20
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2021
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JackDaw View Post
    You are completely ignoring babyblob’s point that many English words have several meanings. That is just factual. The word “set”, for example, has over 20 different meanings.

    If you look up the word “strike” in any reputable English Dictionary…say Chambers or the Oxford Dictionary…it will list “withdrawal of Labour” as one of the standard meanings.

    The Chambers 21st Century Dictionary (version published in 1999) lists no fewer than 18 different meanings for the word strike…with “hit” being the most common meaning, with “organised withdrawal of labour” being 13th listed meaning. (i.e. it’s a valid meaning but less common.)

    And it’s certainly not a “misappropriation”! (Check the phrase in any reputable English dictionary…misappropriation means theft, it does not mean “use inappropriately”.)
    The withdrawal of labour context of the application of strike is a misappropriation, or is an inaccurate use of the term, in regards to ethics

  6. #21
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3,442

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    The withdrawal of labour context of the application of strike is a misappropriation, or is an inaccurate use of the term, in regards to ethics
    Lol.

    What is the point of starting a thread about the meaning of a particular word if you are going to ignore the standard dictionary definitions listed for that word??

  7. #22
    Extraordinary Member babyblob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    New Richmond Ohio
    Posts
    5,676

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    The withdrawal of labour context of the application of strike is a misappropriation, or is an inaccurate use of the term, in regards to ethics
    Its not a matter of ethics dude. It is a matter that in several Dictionaries mention "withdrawal of labour” as a meaning of the word strike. So at this point you are ignoring this to keep making some point that is not valid or you are just trolling. Either way this is the dumbest thing in the world.
    Favorite teams. Alpha Flight, Avengers, Fantastic Four, West Coast Avengers, Justice Society of America, Legion of Superheroes.

  8. #23
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2021
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by babyblob View Post
    Its not a matter of ethics dude. It is a matter that in several Dictionaries mention "withdrawal of labour” as a meaning of the word strike. So at this point you are ignoring this to keep making some point that is not valid or you are just trolling. Either way this is the dumbest thing in the world.
    When the government or the state says strike, as and when people don't perform manual labour, that might be trolling
    Last edited by trokanmariel33; 10-20-2021 at 09:40 AM.

  9. #24
    Extraordinary Member babyblob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    New Richmond Ohio
    Posts
    5,676

    Default

    Dude you are trolling. I pointed out a very well know fact in the world that words have many meanings. jack pointed out the Dictionaries that have the word strike listed and what it meant. You ignore all of that. You are a troll and not a very good one and can not be taken seriously.

    This is my last post on the matter. I have to redo my island on Animal Crossing and that is a better use my my time at this point.
    Favorite teams. Alpha Flight, Avengers, Fantastic Four, West Coast Avengers, Justice Society of America, Legion of Superheroes.

  10. #25
    Astonishing Member JackDaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    3,442

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    When the government or the state says strike, as and when people don't perform manual labour, that might be trolling
    Realistically it’s not just the government or the state that use the word “strike” to mean “organised withdrawal of Labour”…it’s used like that by the large majority of people, and invariably the context it’s used in makes the meaning clear, and in that context carries no suggestion of physical attack.

    For several years I worked as a trade union representative, and often had discussions with colleagues about tactics to get better pay and conditions for union members.

    When we were talking about the possibility of arguing for an organised withdrawal of Labour…we invariably talked about “strike action”, “should we ballot the members about striking”, “we should go on strike”, etc, etc

    I never heard any other term used in that situation by any one at any level in the union. Certainly no one ever took up your suggestion to use the term “nothing”. The phrase “let’s ballot the members about nothing” would be met with total incomprehension!
    Last edited by JackDaw; 10-20-2021 at 09:58 AM.

  11. #26
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2021
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JackDaw View Post
    Realistically it’s not just the government or the state that use the word “strike” to mean “organised withdrawal of Labour”…it’s used like that by the large majority of people, and invariably the context it’s used in makes the meaning clear, and in that context carries no suggestion of physical attack.

    For several years I worked as a trade union representative, and often had discussions with colleagues about tactics to get better pay and conditions for union members.

    When we were talking about the possibility of arguing for an organised withdrawal of Labour…we invariably talked about “strike action”, “should we ballot the members about striking”, “we should go on strike”, etc, etc

    I never heard any other term used in that situation by any one at any level in the union. Certainly no one ever took up your suggestion to use the term “nothing”. The phrase “let’s ballot the members about nothing” would be met with total incomprehension!
    Why is the term strike used to mean the organised withdrawal of labour, if there is no suggestion of physical attack?

  12. #27
    Fantastic Member ERON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    Why is the term strike used to mean the organised withdrawal of labour, if there is no suggestion of physical attack?
    It was already explained earlier in the thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirby101 View Post
    "The use of the English word "strike" to describe a work protest was first seen in 1768, when sailors, in support of demonstrations in London, "struck" or removed the topgallant sails of merchant ships at port, thus crippling the ships.".

  13. #28
    Amazing Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2021
    Posts
    56

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ERON View Post
    It was already explained earlier in the thread:
    But that was in 1768, about almost 300 years ago.

  14. #29
    Extraordinary Member babyblob's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    New Richmond Ohio
    Posts
    5,676

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    But that was in 1768, about almost 300 years ago.
    That is where it started! Every word has an origin! It has been explained many times. Move on!
    Favorite teams. Alpha Flight, Avengers, Fantastic Four, West Coast Avengers, Justice Society of America, Legion of Superheroes.

  15. #30
    Fantastic Member ERON's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    335

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trokanmariel33 View Post
    But that was in 1768, about almost 300 years ago.
    You asked why the term "strike" is used to mean the organized withdrawal of labor. That's the answer. The term "strike" is used to mean the organized withdrawal of labor because of that incident almost 300 years ago where the sailors "struck" the sails of the ships in protest.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •