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  1. #1
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    Default "Why Does America Reject Real Heroes But Embrace Fictional Superheroes?"

    Check it out...

    Rick Marschall (Christian, author, former Marvel editor, former Disney writer, former teacher at SVA) wrote another wonderful article about comics, Christian comics, and Christian creators...

    Rick Marschall writes: "All while art imitates life imitates art in society. But in one corner, there is a growing active and fertile group of creators staking a claim – not only for traditional values and wholesome storylines… but for Biblical Christianity. Good guys who are good guys, and who win."

    This kinda stuff needs to be discussed more amongst readers and creators.

    Thanks, Rick, for speaking out.

    Also, I am quoted in the article, as well.

    Check it out...

    https://www.mondayministry.com/blog/...l-superheroes/

    #theswordofeden #anactoffaithcomic #comics #graphicnovels #SequentialArt #creatorsrights #comicbookstore #comicbookstores #Christianbookstore #Christianbookstores #ChristianityandComics #christiancomics #everythingchristian #MakeComicsGreatAgain #JesusMatters

  2. #2
    Extraordinary Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    There is a bias [against Christianity] in entertainment. Modern Western culture promotes a godless woke agenda.
    When ever I see someone say that there is a "woke agenda" I know that I can just stop reading.
    Looking for a friendly place to discuss comic books? Try The Classic Comics Forum!

  3. #3
    small press afficionado matt levin's Avatar
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    Sadly enough, "Christianity" has itself, in its U.S. American new-embodiment typified by the "religious right," alas, raised plenty of reason for bias against Christianity generally. The news has broken about 'Christian' transgressions against others, easily twice--well more than twice, it seems--as often as any news of 'Christian' heroism. And of course fictional heroes will garner more support than real ones. Fictional heroes' stories run on and on, sometimes 60 issues or more; real heroes get perhaps a week's news coverage. Fictional heroes have flaws we overlook or they overcome; real heroes' flaws are rarely overlooked, and rarely 'news' when overcome. I'd say U.S. America does not 'reject' real heroes so much as forget them once their heroism, usually a one-time situation rather than a maxi-series-long story, is over.
    Age/Bronze, Age/Reptiles, Alex&Ada, Anne Bonnie, Astro City, Bone, Briggs Land, Cerebus, Criminal, Courtney Crumrin, Eleanor & the Egret, Fables, Fatale, Fell, Grass Kings, Green Valley, Goon, Gotham Midnight, Groo, Hellboy, Hillbilly, Incognegro, Jack Staff, JL8, Jonah Hex, Kane, Lazarus, Little Nemo, Lone Wolf, Next Wave, Popeye, Powers, Princess Ugg, Resident Alien, SiP, Squirrel Girl, Stray Bullets, 10G, Thief of Thieves, Tuki, Uncle Scrooge, Usagi, Velvet

  4. #4
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    people read about characters they enjoy and stories they like. it's pretty simple. it doesn't matter if they are "real" or not.

    as for real people, living or dead, pick anybody you want for any reason... and it all ends up the same. you transform a flawed, multi-faceted "real" person into a heroic icon to meet the needs of a particular agenda. they generally only work as heroes within a specific time from and within a specific perspective.

    "real heroes" are nothing more than instruments of propaganda. people tend to not read hagiographies and propaganda for the purposes of entertainment.

    if you're interested in discussing Christian approaches to art and culture, and how that applies to comic books... I would advise you to not spend a lot of time trying to talk about it in general terms here. that will just end up with the usual Culture War mentality playing out in the generally unsatisfying manner that it always does.

    be specific: if you wanted to talk about "the Picture Bible" and explore how that connects to the medium of comics in general... that'd be fine. the work that Iva Hoth (a woman from Illinois) and Andre Leblanc (Haitian immigrant to the US) did on that book was something I really enjoyed as a child.

    Christianity is on a downward spiral of cultural influence for many, many reasons. it's not going to regain its former influence and status. it's not something to be too terribly concerned about.... because religion is never going to disappear.

  5. #5
    Astonishing Member Zelena's Avatar
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    The interesting question is that why America prefers heroes with super-powers, which we cannot never be and are less interested by heroes whose qualities are courage, intelligence, strength… who can be role-models for everyone…

    The first heroes of the American pop culture didn’t have super-powers: Prince Valiant, Tarzan, Flash Gordon…
    “Strength is the lot of but a few privileged men; but austere perseverance, harsh and continuous, may be employed by the smallest of us and rarely fails of its purpose, for its silent power grows irresistibly greater with time.” Goethe

  6. #6
    see beauty in all things. charliehustle415's Avatar
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    Why did the Greeks/Romans/Egyptians/Scandinavians/Hindus/Taoists/Shintoists/Aztecs/Mayans reject real heroes but embrace gods and demigods?

  7. #7
    Astonishing Member Zelena's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by charliehustle415 View Post
    Why did the Greeks/Romans/Egyptians/Scandinavians/Hindus/Taoists/Shintoists/Aztecs/Mayans reject real heroes but embrace gods and demigods?
    True, they love also their fantasy heroes… But Hercules, although Zeus’ son, couldn’t throw lightning bolts like his father. His super-power was super-strength, a rather mundane super-power.

    And there was Ulysses, simple mortal, who was just considered as courageous and cunning…

    I don’t know the other mythologies but, next to the gods that had real and cool super-powers, most of Greek heroes didn’t have super-powers that could solve their problems easily.
    “Strength is the lot of but a few privileged men; but austere perseverance, harsh and continuous, may be employed by the smallest of us and rarely fails of its purpose, for its silent power grows irresistibly greater with time.” Goethe

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by thwhtGuardian View Post
    When ever I see someone say that there is a "woke agenda" I know that I can just stop reading.
    Right. I don't need Christianity shoved on my face.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Nickerson View Post
    Why Does America Reject Real Heroes But Embrace Fictional Superheroes?
    i didn't see any "real" heroes mentioned in the article. Just something about Christian mythology.

  10. #10
    Ultimate Member Lee Stone's Avatar
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    "Perhaps, he realized, that one of the reasons he hated that term 'savior' applied to him was that he believed he wasn't taking real risks doing what he did. Most of his actions, he felt, weren't life-threatening. He was invulnerable; almost nothing except for kryptonite could harm him. But policemen, firemen, people like these astronauts, they put their lives on the line every time they tried to help mankind take yet another small step forward. They were the real heroes, and he wished they received the acclaim they deserved."
    "There's magic in the sound of analog audio." - CNET.

  11. #11
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    Humans aren't fully logical creatures. They're selective creatures, selective logic and emotions when it suits them.

  12. #12
    Ultimate Member dietrich's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Nickerson View Post
    Check it out...

    Rick Marschall (Christian, author, former Marvel editor, former Disney writer, former teacher at SVA) wrote another wonderful article about comics, Christian comics, and Christian creators...

    Rick Marschall writes: "All while art imitates life imitates art in society. But in one corner, there is a growing active and fertile group of creators staking a claim – not only for traditional values and wholesome storylines… but for Biblical Christianity. Good guys who are good guys, and who win."

    This kinda stuff needs to be discussed more amongst readers and creators.

    Thanks, Rick, for speaking out.

    Also, I am quoted in the article, as well.

    Check it out...

    https://www.mondayministry.com/blog/...l-superheroes/

    #theswordofeden #anactoffaithcomic #comics #graphicnovels #SequentialArt #creatorsrights #comicbookstore #comicbookstores #Christianbookstore #Christianbookstores #ChristianityandComics #christiancomics #everythingchristian #MakeComicsGreatAgain #JesusMatters
    Good guys don't win in the Bible. The win always goes to the guy that can sacrifice the most goats.

    Super hero comics have a wide appeal because they aren't restricted by 'traditional values' [what does that even mean? whose tradition are these values based on?]

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