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  1. #91
    The Man Who Cannot Die manwhohaseverything's Avatar
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    i like clark being weakling..It always reminded me of jackie chan..why would anyone want clark kent with glasse to be another bruce lee is beyond me?always wondered about that.
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  2. #92
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    I have watched THE ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN television series all the way through, and I am in the process of watching it again. While I like George Reeves in the role of Superman and Clark Kent, there's very little difference in how he acts as one or the other. I prefer it when actors play them as two distinct characters.

    On the T.V. show, Clark is so in charge and heroic, most of the time, and forever telling everyone else what to do--even Bill Henderson. Yet Kent came to town after White, Lane, Olsen and Henderson were already there--as established in the pilot. What gives him the right?

    And when Lois Lane--as played by Phyllis Coates or Noel Neill--becomes exasperated with Clark Kent for being a wimp, it comes out of left field. In this universe, Lois has no basis for thinking Clark is falling down on the job, because most of the time he's just like Superman. So Lois appears unfair to her co-worker. Why's she on his case?

    The few times when Reeves plays Clark as anything but heroic are refreshing, since it gives him a chance to stretch as an actor.

    I've also been listening to the radio show and I'm starting to wonder if Superman will ever become a public figure on that series. I'm afraid I'll get to the end of the episodes available online before anyone in the series actually has reason to say "It's a bird, it's a plane, it's Superman." In every episode, Clark Kent is doing all the super-hero stuff on the quiet--apparently afraid to let anyone know that Superman actually exists.

    I can understand why some people want Clark to be the hero, because it's tough to see him endure scorn in front of his co-workers. But I think writers have to be hard-hearted and put Clark through the wringer.

    As a little kid, I used to hide behind the couch whenever Lucy got herself in trouble, it was too tough for me to watch her failing at a job. But the comedy was in seeing Lucille Ball play those emotions. If every main character is always succeeding, then where's the conflict, where's the comedy or the tragedy?

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  3. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Kelly View Post
    I have watched THE ADVENTURES OF SUPERMAN television series all the way through, and I am in the process of watching it again. While I like George Reeves in the role of Superman and Clark Kent, there's very little difference in how he acts as one or the other. I prefer it when actors play them as two distinct characters.

    On the T.V. show, Clark is so in charge and heroic, most of the time, and forever telling everyone else what to do--even Bill Henderson. Yet Kent came to town after White, Lane, Olsen and Henderson were already there--as established in the pilot. What gives him the right?

    And when Lois Lane--as played by Phyllis Coates or Noel Neill--becomes exasperated with Clark Kent for being a wimp, it comes out of left field. In this universe, Lois has no basis for thinking Clark is falling down on the job, because most of the time he's just like Superman. So Lois appears unfair to her co-worker. Why's she on his case?

    The few times when Reeves plays Clark as anything but heroic are refreshing, since it gives him a chance to stretch as an actor.

    I've also been listening to the radio show and I'm starting to wonder if Superman will ever become a public figure on that series. I'm afraid I'll get to the end of the episodes available online before anyone in the series actually has reason to say "It's a bird, it's a plane, it's Superman." In every episode, Clark Kent is doing all the super-hero stuff on the quiet--apparently afraid to let anyone know that Superman actually exists.

    I can understand why some people want Clark to be the hero, because it's tough to see him endure scorn in front of his co-workers. But I think writers have to be hard-hearted and put Clark through the wringer.

    As a little kid, I used to hide behind the couch whenever Lucy got herself in trouble, it was too tough for me to watch her failing at a job. But the comedy was in seeing Lucille Ball play those emotions. If every main character is always succeeding, then where's the conflict, where's the comedy or the tragedy?
    Lois believes that Clark is a coward on the show doesn't make a whole lot of sense. It seems like an artifact from the comics that was just left in.

    I agree that it would have been nice for Reeves to distinguish the two personalities a bit more (though I do think there is a difference between his Clark and his Superman - he subtly seems to be a little more casual and friendly as Superman, although I might be imagining that). But I disagree with the notion that Clark has to be a 'weakling' or dramatically clumsy, whiny or buffoonish, in order to distinguish him from Superman. 'Mild-mannered' doesn't have to equal being a coward. That's something Byrne and the other Post-COIE writers did a pretty good job with. STAS, which was my introduction to Superman, did a pretty good job with this as well. Henry Cavill's Clark (whom we only got to see in BvS really) felt very Reeves-ish in how assertive he was, but he did a decent job distinguishing the two identities.

    Moreover, if you look back at the early Golden Age stories too, Clark really only acted timid in the presence of Lois, George Taylor, or other people he knew when there was immediate danger. That apart, Clark was a crusading reporter, actually the Daily Star's top reporter (back in those early stories, Lois was actually relegated to the agony aunt columns...which probably also fuelled her antagonism towards Clark) and most Superman adventures began as his investigations. I think George Reeves borrowed heavily from this aspect of Reporter Clark in the Siegal/Shuster stories while toning down (or eliminating entirely) the aspect of him pretending to be a weakling.

  4. #94
    The Man Who Cannot Die manwhohaseverything's Avatar
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    My problem is,superman doesn't do humor.At best some dry humour or some cheekiness and quips here/there.Clark(glasses guy)is the only source of humour.If clark becomes superman/bruce lee then people would loose attention.The dynamics has lots to offer.Superman without humour is basically batman that punches with superstrength for the little guy.That ain't no fun.
    I see clark as someone who can sell the hell out of getting hit.Jackie does the whole gets hit,makes a face and accidentally kicking ass routine.That's the kinda thing i want from clark kent guy.Supes should be straight up intense and powerful.
    Last edited by manwhohaseverything; 09-15-2022 at 09:23 PM.
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  5. #95
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    Do any of the "real" interpretations of Clark Kent have a scene as iconic as this one?

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  6. #96
    The Man Who Cannot Die manwhohaseverything's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The World View Post
    Do any of the "real" interpretations of Clark Kent have a scene as iconic as this one?

    Precisely,the kinda things i love.he's wearing the hat to boot..
    "People’s Dreams... Have No Ends"

  7. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by manwhohaseverything View Post
    My problem is,superman doesn't do humor.At best some dry humour or some cheekiness and quips here/there.Clark(glasses guy)is the only source of humour.If clark becomes superman/bruce lee then people would loose attention.The dynamics has lots to offer.Superman without humour is basically batman that punches with superstrength for the little guy.That ain't no fun.
    I see clark as someone who can sell the hell out of getting hit.Jackie does the whole gets hit,makes a face and accidentally kicking ass routine.That's the kinda thing i want from clark kent guy.Supes should be straight up intense and powerful.
    Well that may be your preference, and its a valid one. You do make a good point about the humor.

    But I frankly don't like the idea of Clark being a butt-monkey. I do think there's a whole spectrum between Clark being a total clumsy oaf and butt-monkey and Clark acting exactly like Superman. I think the Post-COIE era, and most adaptations derived from it, have found that happy middle. I even like what Henry Cavill did - portray an assertive Reeves-ish Clark who still feels very distinct from his take on Superman.

    I think there's a lot of humor that can be mined from the secret identity situation without making Clark a total joke.

    Quote Originally Posted by The World View Post
    Do any of the "real" interpretations of Clark Kent have a scene as iconic as this one?

    Well, there's the scene in STAS where Clark sarcastically 'confesses' to Lois that he's Superman. I admit its not as iconic as this scene (I mean, in terms of iconicity its hard to beat the Donner movie to be honest). But it does show you can have some great Clark moments without him being a total joke.

    Getting back to the core topic of this thread about what makes for a ''classic'' Superman, I do think that on the subject of Clark Kent a happy middle has been found. I don't think most modern fans want a return to the Donner/Reeve dynamic (and DC/WB have largely avoided going back to that as well). At the same time, the George Reeves take of a Clark as assertive and aggressive (sometimes even more) than Superman is also not in vogue. I think most takes on Clark today are mild-mannered and occasionally a bit dramatically clumsy but not total buffoons. I know that Clark acting weak and abandoning Lois on the dance floor to gangsters is something from Action Comics # 1, but I don't see that scene playing out that way with any contemporary take on the character.

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